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Author W.P. Kinsella (1935-2016)


jakeem
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The Canadian author W.P. Kinsella, whose 1982 baseball novel "Shoeless Joe" became the 1989 movie "Field of Dreams," is dead at the age of 81. He ended his own life under Canada's right-to-die legislation, which became effective in June.

 

Directed by Phil Alden Robinson, "Field of Dreams" tells the story of Iowa farmer Ray Kinsella (Kevin Costner) who is encouraged by a mysterious voice to turn his cornfield into a baseball diamond. After he complies, he discovers that his new baseball field has magically attracted some of the greatest players in history.

 

 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/wp-kinsella-dead-shoeless-joe-929807

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Field of Dreams is one of the most syrupy pieces of slop that has ever debauched a screen. I was throwing up in the theater but I couldn't leave because my mother was with me. She liked the movie and I have forgiven her. The movie shows Shoeless Joe batting from the wrong side of the plate. A sappy, nauseating mess.

 

W.P. Kinsella, RIP

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I prefer to imagine that voice telling Costner to use the force.

 

(I think it's actually not James Earl Jones who does the voice, however.)

 

(BTW, Lafitte, your sig is grammatically incorrect. It should be mich, not sich.)

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Field of Dreams is one of the most syrupy pieces of slop that has ever debauched a screen. I was throwing up in the theater but I couldn't leave because my mother was with me. She liked the movie and I have forgiven her. The movie shows Shoeless Joe batting from the wrong side of the plate. A sappy, nauseating mess.

 

W.P. Kinsella, RIP

 

But it's about baseball, which makes up for any of the movie's flaws. If the speech by James Earl Jones -- who plays the writer modeled after J.D Salinger -- isn't shown regularly at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, it should be.

 

 

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But it's about baseball, which makes up for any of the movie's flaws.

Some would argue that being about baseball is the biggest flaw of them all. :P

 

Unrelated, but The Cowboy Quarterback works where Elmer The Great (the original version of the same story) doesn't because football allows for player substitutions where baseball doesn't.

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Some would argue that being about baseball is the biggest flaw of them all. :P

 

Unrelated, but The Cowboy Quarterback works where Elmer The Great (the original version of the same story) doesn't because football allows for player substitutions where baseball doesn't.

 

Baseball does allow for player substitutions, but managers have to be creative about it. In the bottom of the 12th inning of a September 9th game at Phoenix, the San Francisco Giants led the Arizona Diamondbacks 7-6.  

 

With one out and a left-handed batter up, Giants manager Bruce Bochy moved right-handed reliever Cory Gearrin from the mound to play left field -- which the pitcher  had never done before. After being instructed where to play by veteran outfielders Denard Span and Hunter Pence, Gearrin watched as southpaw relief pitcher Javier Lopez walked the next batter. And then Gearrin returned to the mound to get the final two outs.

 

It was the first time since October 1, 1991 that a pitcher in Major League Baseball played another position AND got the save!

 

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Field of Dreams is one of the most syrupy pieces of slop that has ever debauched a screen. I was throwing up in the theater but I couldn't leave because my mother was with me. She liked the movie and I have forgiven her. The movie shows Shoeless Joe batting from the wrong side of the plate. A sappy, nauseating mess.

 

W.P. Kinsella, RIP

 

 

It's good to know filial sentiments triumphed over aesthetic sensibilities.

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Let me rephrase it. Once the Joe E. Brown character in Elmer the Great was removed from the game, he wouldn't be allowed to come back in.

 

Bert Wheeler in The Cowboy Quarterback could come back in. (I think back in those days there were still a lot of two-way players.)

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Let me rephrase it. Once the Joe E. Brown character in Elmer the Great was removed from the game, he wouldn't be allowed to come back in.

 

Bert Wheeler in The Cowboy Quarterback could come back in. (I think back in those days there were still a lot of two-way players.)

 

I realize that. Just wanted to point out a recent example of why baseball is always fascinating. There's always a chance you'll see something that hasn't happened in 100 years -- like the Chicago Cubs winning a World Series!

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