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The Last Time


Richard Kimble
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A thread for the last time something happened onscreen

 

I'll start:

 

The last time someone pronounced ""Los Angeles" with a hard "g"?

 

Im a non-ironic way, that is.. For years I thought it was Ed Begley in his testimony scene in Warning Shot (1967). But  a year or two ago I saw a first season (1968-9) episode of The Name Of The Game where guest star John Payne says it that way.

 

Anything more recent?

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Last non-ironic use of the Psycho house?

 

The Bates place can be seen in episodes of several Universal series of the '60s such as Wagon Train and Shotgun Slade. A Laramie appearance is notable as it used the interior of the house. The last such use I'm aware of is in an episode of Alias Smith & Jones from 1971. When Psycho began paying a lot on TV the house became too iconic for non-referential use.

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How about the last time someone used the word 'gay' to mean happy and not as a reference to sexual orientation. 

 

The 1980 Luther Vandross song 'The Glow of Love' uses the word 'gay' as a synonym for happiness, but I can't think of any other modern examples in music or on screen. Can you?

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Say, and speaking of pronouncing the names of California cities...

 

When was the last time somebody in film referred to the City by the Bay as "Frisco"?

 

(...'cause evidently the folks up there now days think doing that designates someone as being "low class" when they do that anymore)

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  • 1 month later...

Sepiatone's post made me think it would be interesting to have a list of a probably incredibly narrow type of movie: the ones that have in their title or focus most of their plot around some device of technology that was rapidly becoming or already pretty much extinct by the time of its release. Phone Booth is a great example. Heck, I remember as a kid the crowd got a huge laugh way back in 1978 in Superman when Clark Kent was looking for a phone booth to change in, and all he could find was an unenclosed phone kiosk. So, phone booths were really ancient by the time Phone Booth came out two dozen years later (and I believe it was one of those films that sat on the shelf for about two years). Another one I thought of is the very dark Robin Williams suspense drama One Hour Photo, which I think is another film that may have sat for a year or two before release, by which time photo development outlets were virtually nonexistent.

 

Edit: Ooh, I just thought of another one. When the American version of The Ring movies came out with their cursed VHS Tapes of Death, I remember some critics snickering that VCRs weren't exactly really common in American homes anymore.

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The word "alienist" was used in a contemporary setting?

 

For those unfamiliar with the term:

 

Alienist is an archaic term for a psychiatrist or psychologist. Despite falling out of favor by the middle of the twentieth century, it received renewed attention when used in the title of Caleb Carr's novel The Alienist (1994).

 

I was unaware of  the following:

 

Although currently not often used in common parlance, the term "alienist" is still employed in psychiatric hospitals to describe those mental health professionals who evaluate defendants to determine their competency to stand trial.

 

I just listened to a 1944 episode of the radio series Suspense in which the word is used, though in the latter, criminal trial  sense. The word is also used in Compulsion (1959), set in 1924, in the same context of a criminal trial..

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