Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Abbot and Costello


robertc638
 Share

Recommended Posts

They were terrific.  I laughed out loud.  They combine the verbal slapstick, i.e. the bantering between Abbott and Costello characters, and the physical slapstick via Lou Costello.  The "Frankenstein" movie is hysterical.   Loved Bela Lugosi and Dracula, Lon Chaney Jr. as the Wolfman, and the only one missing was Boris Karloff as the monster.  But the actor who took over the Monster role did a fine job, I just thought he was a little stiff (hahahaha).

 

Abbott and Costello rank with Laurel & Hardy, and the silent slapstick comedians, like Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They were terrific.  I laughed out loud.  They combine the verbal slapstick, i.e. the bantering between Abbott and Costello characters, and the physical slapstick via Lou Costello.  The "Frankenstein" movie is hysterical.   Loved Bela Lugosi and Dracula, Lon Chaney Jr. as the Wolfman, and the only one missing was Boris Karloff as the monster.  But the actor who took over the Monster role did a fine job, I just thought he was a little stiff (hahahaha).

 

Abbott and Costello rank with Laurel & Hardy, and the silent slapstick comedians, like Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd.

 

Could not agree more how terrific A&C are in this movie.  FYI - the actor who played Frankenstein's monster, Glenn Strange, was the last actor to play the monster in Universal's Frankenstein series.  Boris Karloff only played the monster in the first three films in the series.  And, yes......he was a bit stiff - ha-ha !!!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To add a little more on actors who played the monster in the Universal "Frankenstein" series:  

 

 Boris Karloff played the role in the first three movies: "Frankenstein" (1931), "Bride of Frankenstein" (1935) and "Son of Frankenstein (1939).  Lon Chaney, Jr. played the role in the "Ghost of Frankenstein" (1942), with Bela Lugosi reprising the role of Ygor that he played in "Son...."  Lugosi took over the role in the next one, "Frankenstein meets the Wolfman" (1943), as Chaney was busy playing "Wolfie."  Glenn Strange played the role in the final two installments in the Universal series: "House of Frankenstein" (1944) and "House of Dracula" (1945).  By this point the series had run its course, as they tried to add more monsters (all but the Invisible Man & the Mummy were used) and story twists (my favorite being the female hunchback lab assistant in "House of Dracula").  After the first four movies, the original "science fiction" story of Frankenstein was combined with the "supernatural horror" stories of the Wolfman and Dracula.  After a three year rest, the monsters were resurrected as the object of parody in "Abbott & Costello meet Frankenstein" (1948).  They even managed to get the Invisible Man (voiced by Vincent Price) involved in a cameo at the end.  Only the Mummy missed out on the fun; he must not have had a very good agent.

 

Glenn Strange went on to play the bartender of Miss Kitty's Long Branch Saloon on the "Gunsmoke" series on TV (but not on radio).  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

They even managed to get the Invisible Man (voiced by Vincent Price) involved in a cameo at the end.  Only the Mummy missed out on the fun; he must not have had a very good agent.

Vincent Price was not only a master of horror, but a very funny man. Have you seen him in this cult-classic TV series from 1971?

 

 

 

 

 

They shot all of his segments in three very long days, and he contributed hugely to getting the show's mix of slapstick and creepiness just right. And he was not only a legend but a real mensch. When he first arrived on-set, he personally introduced himself to each cast and crew member, and said what a pleasure it was to be working with them.

 

They were still very much in awe of this great man. After one very long intense day of shooting, he suddenly left the set, and drove away. Everyone thought, "Uh-oh. We've offended him somehow." Twenty minutes later, he returned with beer for everyone, and they all sat around, sharing stories. Then, he posed for a photo with each person. He quickly had the photos developed and enlarged into 8×10s, which he then personally inscribed and autographed for each person.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...