Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

An Anecdote About IT'S A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD


Palmerin
 Share

Recommended Posts

When IAMMMMW was about to premiere in Argentina, a distributor thought it strained credibility to have Berle married to a woman young enough to be his daughter and saddled with a mother in law almost his same age. He therefore had the Spanish dialogue arranged to make Berle and Merman very unfriendly husband and wife, and Provine and Shawn their very cantankerous daughter and son. That rearrangement of family roles proved so successful, that even after the people of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay learned the true relationships of the four characters, almost everybody agreed that the distributor's rearrangement made much better sense.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmmm...interesting, Palmerin. So you're sayin' the incidences of older men marrying much younger women in South America is a rarity down there, are ya?! Never knew that.

 

But tell me here. Is there an equivalent saying in Spanish of "Kicking the bucket"?...

 

its-a-mad-3.jpg

 

...and like the Great Snozola here does in that flick...both figuratively AND literally here?

 

(...well, figuratively perhaps ONLY in the English lexicon, anyway)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The distributor was concerned about the fact that Merman treats Berle more as her very henpecked husband instead of as her son in law. Did Provine marry Berle against Merman's wishes?

There are at least two expressions: ESTIRO LA PATA=HIS LEG WENT STIFF, and SE QUEDO FRIO=HE ENDED UP ROOM TEMPERATURE.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The distributor was concerned about the fact that Merman treats Berle more as her very henpecked husband instead of as her son in law. Did Provine marry Berle against Merman's wishes?

There are at least two expressions: ESTIRO LA PATA=HIS LEG WENT STIFF, and SE QUEDO FRIO=HE ENDED UP ROOM TEMPERATURE.

 

Thanks. And so in Spanish, no "buckets" are ever involved either figuratively OR literally in the process of dying then, eh?! Then I suppose that whole bucket thing Durante does in that scene must've went right over the heads of those folks watchin' this flick south of the border, huh! And, even though Jimmy's leg DOES "get stiff" in order to kick that bucket during his death scene.

 

Okay, and now that we've got THAT settled here, I have another question for ya, ol' buddy...

 

When they used some Spanish speaking woman to dub Ethel Merman's part in that movie, was HER voice as annoying in Spanish as Ethel's was in ENGLISH??? ;)

 

(...I'm gonna guess the answer is "yes", right?!)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The custom in Spanish America is to use dubbing actors whose voices are not heavily accented so that they may be understood all the way from Mexico to Argentina--just the same way news shows in the USA use news readers whose voices will be understood from Salem, MA, to Salem, OR. The actress who dubbed Merman was superb; she really sounded like her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmmm...interesting, Palmerin. So you're sayin' the incidences of older men marrying much younger women in South America is a rarity down there, are ya?! Never knew that.

 

But tell me here. Is there an equivalent saying in Spanish of "Kicking the bucket"?...

 

its-a-mad-3.jpg

 

...and like the Great Snozola here does in that flick...both figuratively AND literally here?

 

(...well, figuratively perhaps ONLY in the English lexicon, anyway)

la bambing the sombrero? :huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

   On a personal note, I do know that from all accounts all that were involved & or starred in this epic comedy were said to be in constant

awe of what they called "The Master" *"The Great: Spencer Tracy"-(l900-l967) throughout filming

 

& I saw a marvelous documentary once on TCM about the real filmmakers of Cinerama, Travellogs, Newsreels & all the other film experiments they did starting in the 1950's, to try & combat the advent of television. Stretching "The Silver-Screen' in all ways possible, including of course 3-D,etc

 

They focused on 1 pioneer, who used to fly his plane in as close as possible in order to get the most exciting shots, but 1 day he got to close to a raging volcano & vanished

 

& they all swore that "How the West Was Won" (l963) was the real-deal Cinerama wise, with all the cameras & so on, but that "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, World" (also l963) was not really in the same league as the epic Western & the studio just advertised it as the same?

 

I thought both were made exactly the same, with the split screen, but apparently not & to this day the famed "Cinerama Dome" in mid "Tinsel-Town" still shows both classics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

they all swore that "How the West Was Won" (l963) was the real-deal Cinerama wise, with all the cameras & so on, but that "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, World" (also l963) was not really in the same league as the epic Western & the studio just advertised it as the same?

 

I thought both were made exactly the same, with the split screen, but apparently not & to this day the famed "Cinerama Dome" in mid "Tinsel-Town" still shows both classics.

 

 

Like the current "Large-screen format" (that had to stop calling itself "IMAX" if it wasn't using IMAX film), there was some confusion over what was even a one-projector Cinerama movie and what was just shown on a big screen.

 

The early narrative three-projector Cinerama movies still played with gimmicks like the 3-D movies did--Usually, like the travelogues, putting you "in" the scene with wild POV experiences.

The Injun charge from How the West Was Won, for example, or Russ Tamblyn running to catch up with the carriage in Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm.  The big Arctic standoff in Ice Station Zebra or the Strauss-waltzing spaceships of 2001 would be an example of the later confusion.

 

The big-studio movies, though, still had to play the smaller theaters, so most copies of Cinerama titles we see today, like IAM4W and 2001, are the small-town prints.  IAM4W is a little light on "gimmicks" (they just hoped more screen would mean more destruction), but think we did get a few crazy POV's in the desert chases.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, if they tried to pawn off Merman as Berle's henpecking WIFE, how did they handle DICK SHAWN'S character, who in the movie was Merman's SON?

 

Did he then become the son of Merman and Berle?  Or maybe Merman's kid brother?

 

Sepiatone

Which character was crazier, Shawn's character in IAMMMMMW, or the one in THE PRODUCERS?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Which character was crazier, Shawn's character in IAMMMMMW, or the one in THE PRODUCERS?

 

Speaking of Dick Shawn...

 

I remember when Robin Williams first came onto the scene with his almost manic stream-of-consciousness type routines, I'd tell people he so reminded me of Dick Shawn and his comic style when he did stand-up.

 

(...for some reason few people seemed to remember him...could never understand why) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did anybody watch Wednesday night's TCM showing?

 

The schedule said it was going to be 159 minutes with a short at about 10:44 PM, which implies that it would have omitted the overture, intermission, and exit music, and also had the one deleted scene (I think it's Phil Silvers going down the river in his car) still cut.

 

But when I watched the first few minutes, I saw the overture. I couldn't stay up for the end since I have to get up at 4:30 AM for work, so I'm curious if it was the 159-minute version or the ~190-minute version.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Which character was crazier, Shawn's character in IAMMMMMW, or the one in THE PRODUCERS?

 

IMHO, his "World" character was crazier, but his "Producers"  character was funnier.  But it doesn't answer my question.

 

Odd how he died, He was giving a lecture in some college about comedy, and got to the topic of "pratfalls" and in the middle of it just fell to the floor.  The audience laughed at it's "perfect timing" and didn't start to get nervous until he didn't get up or even move for several minutes.  THEN someone went up to check on him and discovered he was dead.  A shame, really.

 

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMHO, his "World" character was crazier, but his "Producers"  character was funnier.  But it doesn't answer my question.

 

Odd how he died, He was giving a lecture in some college about comedy, and got to the topic of "pratfalls" and in the middle of it just fell to the floor.  The audience laughed at it's "perfect timing" and didn't start to get nervous until he didn't get up or even move for several minutes.  THEN someone went up to check on him and discovered he was dead.  A shame, really.

 

 

Sepiatone

Why qualify it with "really"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking of Dick Shawn...

 

Gawd, I just lurve Dick Shawn. You're right too, no one seems to remember him. Pity, as he was a versatile & understated talent. So understated, he doesn't stand out - not unlike Jack Carson.

 

Yeah Tiki. I just could never figure out why he seems to be the forgotten man.

 

However, I'm not so sure one could use the term "understated" to describe his comedic style, though. "Underrated" maybe, but not "understated".

 

Ya see, I once remember him being one of Carson's guests on the old Tonight Show(I believe it's one of those tapes which were erased by NBC before Carson took control of his show) and Shawn become so manic on it that at one point he actually toppled over Johnny's desk, jumped inside it, and proceeded to pretend it was a canoe and made motions like he was rowing it down a stream.

 

As I recall, Johnny seemed somewhat shocked and less then entertained by his antics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, if they tried to pawn off Merman as Berle's henpecking WIFE, how did they handle DICK SHAWN'S character, who in the movie was Merman's SON?

 

Did he then become the son of Merman and Berle?  Or maybe Merman's kid brother?

 

Sepiatone

Berle's son, who has no respect for his old man--no surprise, considering how pitiful the latter is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah Tiki. I just could never figure out why he seems to be the forgotten man.


 


However, I'm not so sure one could use the term "understated" to describe his comedic style, though. "Underrated" maybe, but not "understated".


 


Wow, that Carson incident DOES sound manic! He's not like that in movies, he typically acts fairly straight, making his charactor funnier. (which is why I feel his performances are "understated")


 


Except of course the scenes where he's crying "I'm coming Mamma" tears streaming down his cheeks. I often do that "act" for my mother when she hurries me.


 


(I love when people "get" my movie references)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Yeah Tiki. I just could never figure out why he seems to be the forgotten man.

 

However, I'm not so sure one could use the term "understated" to describe his comedic style, though. "Underrated" maybe, but not "understated".

 

Wow, that Carson incident DOES sound manic! He's not like that in movies, he typically acts fairly straight, making his charactor funnier. (which is why I feel his performances are "understated")

 

Except of course the scenes where he's crying "I'm coming Mamma" tears streaming down his cheeks. I often do that "act" for my mother when she hurries me.

 

(I love when people "get" my movie references)

 

 

And let's not forget when he's more than a little manic and pretty darn hilarious as Der Fuhrer in Mel Brooks' THE PRODUCERS.

 

(...'cause if he wasn't, then the audience watching "Springtime for Hitler" would have indeed walked out of the theater, and then Max's and Leo's plan would have succeeded)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMHO, his "World" character was crazier, but his "Producers"  character was funnier.  But it doesn't answer my question.

 

Odd how he died, He was giving a lecture in some college about comedy, and got to the topic of "pratfalls" and in the middle of it just fell to the floor.  The audience laughed at it's "perfect timing" and didn't start to get nervous until he didn't get up or even move for several minutes.  THEN someone went up to check on him and discovered he was dead.  A shame, really.

 

 

Sepiatone

Yeah, he died on stage and on cue.  An actor's death, but glad I wasn't in the audience when that happened.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...