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A Welcome Addition To The Programming Of TCM


Palmerin
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EL SHOW DE PACHECO, hosted by an Spanish immigrant who dressed in the style of Buster Keaton, is one of my dearest childhood memories. It had an amazingly comprehensive assortment of cartoons, from those of WB that featured 1930s stars such as WC Fields and Mae West, to such 1950s productions as GERALD MCBOING BOING.

As you surely know, most of those cartoons were originally shown on the big screen, along with the comedy and musical shorts, newsreels, and coming previews that preceded the movie itself. Wouldn't you agree that those cartoons would be a welcome addition to the programming of TCM?

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EL SHOW DE PACHECO, hosted by an Spanish immigrant who dressed in the style of Buster Keaton, is one of my dearest childhood memories. It had an amazingly comprehensive assortment of cartoons, from those of WB that featured 1930s stars such as WC Fields and Mae West, to such 1950s productions as GERALD MCBOING BOING.

As you surely know, most of those cartoons were originally shown on the big screen, along with the comedy and musical shorts, newsreels, and coming previews that preceded the movie itself. Wouldn't you agree that those cartoons would be a welcome addition to the programming of TCM?

Well I for one love the old cartoons and when I want a dose of sarcasm and good old parody I go to you tube to watch some of the Merrie Melodies etc. that I find.  I love all the cartoons that use classical music as a background and there are many with Bugs and friends.  However many of the cartoons of the 40's and 50's are now considered politically incorrect and would require warnings (G-d forbid you should have to think for yourself) so I don't imagine they will be shown.  The truly incorrect ones incorporating African Americans and WWII themed would not dare be shown, however thank fully for you tube they are still available. 

 

I recent post I noticed is the following (which sums up today's views on the uptight need for political correctness):

 

1944: 18 year old's stormed the beach at Normandy into almost certain death.

2016: 18 year old's need a safe place because words hurt their feelings.

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1944: 18 year old's stormed the beach at Normandy into almost certain death.

2016: 18 year old's need a safe place because words hurt their feelings.

 

 

Does this mean today's generation needs to toughen up?

 

Ummmm...yeah TB, that DOES seem to be Emily's point here, alright.

 

(...well, it's either THAT, or she wants us to bring back The Draft!) ;)

 

LOL

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Does this mean today's generation needs to toughen up?

I would agree with this...for me to risk a "no no" from TCM you can imagine I do.   Really warnings on books (isn't this like censorship), movies, TV shows and campus presentations...what happened to thinking for yourself.  I know when I look back at some of my high school reading assignments like Faulkner, Charles Dickens and Chaucer and knowing these would rate warnings really depresses me.  My parents taught me values and then taught me to dig deep into material and decide for myself.  I still can't believe that one of my assignments was Faulkner's "Sanctuary" and all that the story entailed. 

 

I also have to agree about the dumbing down of thinking...considering that "Simpsons" ridicules reading the New York Review of Books and the New Yorker and "Family Guy" the Economist I begin to believe I am way outside of the curve as I subscribe to both...no getting around it..I am getting old. 

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Ummmm...yeah TB, that DOES seem to be Emily's point here, alright.

 

(...well, it's either THAT, or she wants us to bring back The Draft!) ;)

 

LOL

Actually I think bringing back the draft is a good idea, either into the military or into something like the Peace Corps.  One aspect of the draft that is no longer considered is that it provided an excellent melding of different groups of people and directed them into an environment that worked for the success of the group.  I know when I was in the military I met individuals I would never have come into contact with in my own environment.  Additionally being in healthcare also gave rise to contacts most likely not otherwise made.  I know being a child of the Fifties is much different than today's world and we still mostly operate in a world of own making and the draft broke down those barriers. 

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Actually I think bringing back the draft is a good idea, either into the military or into something like the Peace Corps.  One aspect of the draft that is no longer considered is that it provided an excellent melding of different groups of people and directed them into an environment that worked for the success of the group.  I know when I was in the military I met individuals I would never have come into contact with in my own environment.  Additionally being in healthcare also gave rise to contacts most likely not otherwise made.  I know being a child of the Fifties is much different than today's world and we still mostly operate in a world of own making and the draft broke down those barriers. 

 

Well Emily, seein' as how the parents of today in many cases have seemed to abrogate their responsibility to teach their little darlings the concept of disciple, yep, there's usually no better place too learn THAT than in the military, huh!

 

(...of course then again, they ALSO teach the concept of blind obedience there too, and so I guess one must, and as they say, "take the bitter with the sweet" here, huh) ;)

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Well Emily, seein' as how the parents of today in many cases have seemed to abrogate their responsibility to teach their little darlings the concept of disciple, yep, there's usually no better place too learn THAT than in the military, huh!

 

(...of course then again, they ALSO teach the concept of blind obedience there too, and so I guess one must, and as they say, "take the bitter with the sweet" here, huh) ;)

Well Dargo I cannot think of any choice that isn't a one between "take the bitter with the sweet".  Unless of course you consider death..it's bitter because you have to leave but it's sweet too..no more politics, war as well as the mundane trivia of life...

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Well Dargo I cannot think of any choice that isn't a one between "take the bitter with the sweet".  Unless of course you consider death..it's bitter because you have to leave but it's sweet too..no more politics, war as well as the mundane trivia of life...

 

Truer words were never spoken, Emily.

 

(...or I guess in this case, typed) ;)

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My esso states that the only time that his number has been drawn in a lottery was called: The Draft and he was the prize.

 

LOL

 

But of course Sans, EVERYBODY'S number was drawn in those lotteries back in the day. Well, that is back in the day when "sexism" was rampant...meaning of course that it was only us GUYS at 18 years of age whose birthdays were pulled from that big jar in successive order.

 

In my case, I still remember like it was yesterday that morning in 1970 where I awoke and ventured into the kitchen to see my mother cooking breakfast with a big smile on her face. When I asked her if the reason for that smile might be because my birthday had been picked late in the lottery the day before, she replied "See for yourself!" and pointed to the L.A. Times sitting on the kitchen table that we had delivered daily to our doorstep. "The Draft Lottery results are printed on page-6", she then said. 

 

I hurriedly sat down and thumbed to page-6 and looked for "March 10", and there it was! My birthday had been pulled 360th, and which meant my chances of being drafted and possibly being sent off to Vietnam were basically zilch!

 

(...yep, I HAVE always been a pretty lucky guy, ya know!!!) ;)

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EL SHOW DE PACHECO, hosted by an Spanish immigrant who dressed in the style of Buster Keaton, is one of my dearest childhood memories. It had an amazingly comprehensive assortment of cartoons, from those of WB that featured 1930s stars such as WC Fields and Mae West, to such 1950s productions as GERALD MCBOING BOING.

As you surely know, most of those cartoons were originally shown on the big screen, along with the comedy and musical shorts, newsreels, and coming previews that preceded the movie itself. Wouldn't you agree that those cartoons would be a welcome addition to the programming of TCM?

 

 

The show, no, the shorts, yes--Except that those who aren't already Warner/MGM (like Tom & Jerry or Looney Tunes) can't show on TCM, and those that are already do show as filler.

Fields and Mae West did their shorts for Universal, and GMcBB belonged to the UPA toons of Columbia.

 

Of course, local afternoon hosts could show any of them, if they were cheap enough.  Your memories are from the days before TCM archives, when shows needed an excuse to show them.

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