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1943 - thoughts


dagoldenage
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I spent time recently, watching films from 1943 and wound up more impressed by the year than I thought I would. That was certainly helped by watching Casablanca with '43 because of being Academy Award eligible.

 

I also watched In Which we Serve with '43.

 

 

My top 10 movies:

 

1. Casablanca

2. Shadow of a Doubt

3. Human Comedy, The

4. Watch on the Rhine

5. Fallen Sparrow

6. Edge of Darkness

7. Destination Tokyo

8. Tender Comrade

9. Hitler’s Children

10. Action in the North Atlantic

 

Best Actor: Humphrey Bogart (Casablanca)

Best Actress: Ida Lupino (The Hard Way)

Supporting Actor: Claude Rains (Casablanca)

Supporting Actress: Paulette Goddard (So Proudly We Hail)

 

1943 titles watched:  93

 

Other thoughts?

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You want by thoughts on "1943", ya say?!

 

Well, okay then. I always thought that flick wasn't one of Steven Spielberg's better efforts and despite John Belushi's valiant efforts to make it as zany a piece as he could.

 

 

(...oh...wait...that wasn't "1943", that was "1941", huh...sorry, never mind) ;)

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daGoldenAge...there isn't a miss step in any of your choices and I'll add my British favs from that year as well:

 

The Life and Times of Colonel Blimp

We Dive at Dawn

 

Both were good films, but especially The Life and Times of Colonel Blimp...

 

LOVE that movie, Emily! Probably the most entertaining propaganda film ever made.

 

(...although, and as I'm sure you know, Churchill wasn't a big fan of it)

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My top 10 movies:

 

1. Casablanca

2. Shadow of a Doubt

3. The More the Merrier

4. I Walked with a Zombie

5. Fallen Sparrow

6. The Hard Way

7. Sahara

8. Five Graves to Cairo

9. Hitler’s Children

10. For Whom the Bell Tolls

 

 

 

Best Actor: Humphrey Bogart (Casablanca)

Best Actress: Ida Lupino (The Hard Way)

Supporting Actor: Charles Coburn (The More the Merrier)

Supporting Actress: Katina Paxinou (For Whom the Bell Tolls)

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Shadow of a Doubt

Casablanca

Hangmen Also Die!

The More The Merrier

The Life and Times of Colonel Blimp

I Walked With A Zombie

The Ox-Bow Incident

 

Actually Winslow, and now that I've caught Emily's earlier mistake here too, that's "The Life and DEATH of Colonel Blimp".

 

(...just for the record, you understand) ;)

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Actually Winslow, and now that I've caught Emily's earlier mistake here too, that's, "The Life and DEATH of Colonel Blimp".

 

(...just for the record, you understand) 

 

Poor Colonel Blimp;  no times for that guy!  

 

Should be called the Life,  Times and Death of Colonel Blimp.       Everyone deserves some good times between life and death (well almost everyone!).

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LOVE that movie, Emily! Probably the most entertaining propaganda film ever made.

 

(...although, and as I'm sure you know, Churchill wasn't a big fan of it)

Dargo:  I well imagine Churchill was no fan of Colonel Blimp...too representative of everyone in military and politics of the day as well as himself.  However the movie is extremely well done and does pose provocative questions that would face the British following the end of the war...this is especially true of the ending of the British Empire, one of Roosevelt's agenda items involved in supporting the British..as well as the fact that Britain was so financially depleted at the end of the war, supporting the Empire was beyond its capabilities.  Regardless of politics and correctness I love the British Empire...you could always drink a Gin and Tonic as it was always five o'clock in the PM somewhere in the Empire...an excuse I used quite frequently. 

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This is what I listed on Larry's thread. I had some honorable mentions, but these were my top ten choices for 1943:

 

 

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My list:

1. SO PROUDLY WE HAIL! (feminist war film)
2. THE HUMAN COMEDY (drama)
3. WATCH ON THE RHINE (drama)
4. THE MORE THE MERRIER (romantic comedy)
5. HEAVEN CAN WAIT (romantic comedy)
6. THE OX-BOW INCIDENT (literary adaptation)
7. MADAME CURIE (biographical drama)
8. SHADOW OF A DOUBT (psychological thriller)
9. STAGE DOOR CANTEEN (morale booster)
10. BATAAN (war film) and SAHARA (war film)

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Dargo:  I well imagine Churchill was no fan of Colonel Blimp...too representative of everyone in military and politics of the day as well as himself. However the movie is extremely well done and does pose provocative questions that would face the British following the end of the war...this is especially true of the ending of the British Empire, one of Roosevelt's agenda items involved in supporting the British..as well as the fact that Britain was so financially depleted at the end of the war, supporting the Empire was beyond its capabilities.  Regardless of politics and correctness I love the British Empire...you could always drink a Gin and Tonic as it was always five o'clock in the PM somewhere in the Empire...an excuse I used quite frequently. 

 

From what I understand Emily, Churchill's main complaint with that Powell and Pressburger film was the whole "Good German" subplot within it and which Anton Walbrook's character represented in the film.

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From what I understand Emily, Churchill's main complaint with that Powell and Pressburger film was the whole "Good German" subplot within it and which Anton Walbrook's character represented in the film.

Well Dargo...you have me there...forgot all about "the Good German" at a time when there were none and I imagine it did give him grief with his war efforts.  However if I remember "the Good German" was a soldier from WWI and the idea of "gentleman soldiers" more prevalent than is WWII.  So good point.

 

Thinking about this whole best movies of the year wouldn't that be a great programming topic.  I believe the best movie years were from 1938 to 1955 and would be a great challenge for TCM and they should include foreign films as well.  Finding a list wouldn't be too hard and the programming could off set SUTS with MUTS (well I guess Muts isn't a good idea) but you get my point. 

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My favorite 10 of 1943 include a couple of pretty obvious choices that are probably on nearly everybody's list, an artsy-fartsy short film, one of my absolute favorite Hitchcocks, a couple of Lewton RKO horror films and three from the UK.

 

1. Casablanca

2. Meshes of the Afternoon

3. The Man in Grey

4. The Ox-Bow Incident

5. Shadow of a Doubt

6. Osessione

7. Fires Were Started

8. The Seventh Victim

9. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

10. I Walked with a Zombie

 

I give Casablanca my major awards across the board: Best Picture, Best Director for Michael Curtiz, Best Actor for Humphrey Bogart, Best Actress for Ingrid Bergman.

 

It doesn't appear either The Man in Grey or Fires Were Started have ever aired on TCM. Can't find them on Movie Collector OH's database. They're worth seeking out, if you can find them. The former is a really dark costume melodrama, the latter a day-in-the-life look at containing fires during the Blitz years, in which actual firefighters play slightly fictionalized versions of themselves.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Top Billed:

 

I'm interested in your thoughts on individual awards/performances of 1943.

 

The easiest one to discuss is best supporting actor, because Charles Coburn is so good in THE MORE THE MERRIER. He truly deserved his Oscar.

 

I'm not sure about Katina Paxinou. While she's quite effective in her later films, I think she gives too stereotypical a performance in FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS. I would have given the award to Lucile Watson for her very nuanced work in WATCH ON THE RHINE. 

 

Paul Lukas was superb in WATCH ON THE RHINE. He had also played that role on Broadway.

 

The best actress category is the toughest one. Jennifer Jones deserved a nomination but not the award in my opinion. I feel Greer Garson was better in MADAME CURIE and so was Joan Fontaine in THE CONSTANT NYMPH. I would have picked Greer. I think it's as good as what she did when she played Mrs. Miniver.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I had 17 vote in my 1943 poll and these were the results: 

Top 10 movies: 

1. Casablanca - Actual Winner 
2. Shadow of a Doubt 
3. Edge of Darkness 
4. More the Merrier, The 
5. Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The 
6. Above Suspicion 
7. Ox-Bow Incident, The 
8. Thank Your Lucky Stars 
9. I Walked with a Zombie 
10. Air Force 


Best Actor: Humphrey Bogart (Casablanca) 
Best Actress: Ida Lupino (The Hard Way) - Not Nominated 
Best Supporting Actor: Claude Rains (Casablanca) 
Best Supporting Actress: Grace George (Johnny Come Lately) – Not Nominated 

Titles with votes: 68 

Titles I watched: 95

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Top 40 Shorties of 1943

 

Most I have seen and some I want to see and include here for curiosity sake since they are well documented in vintage magazines of the period.

 

(Live action)

 

Geography Of The Body (Marie Menken & Willard Maas)

Meshes Of The Afternoon (Maya Deren)

March Of Time #9-10: Show Business At War (Time, Inc./20th Century Fox- Jack Glenn)

Women At War (Warner Bros.- Jean Negulesco) Technicolor Special

The Voice That Thrilled The World (Warner Bros.- Jean Negulesco) Broadway Brevity

Forgotten Treasures (MGM- Sammy Lee) John Nesbitt's "Passing Parade"

Mountain Fighters (Warner Bros.- B. Reeves Eason) Technicolor Special

Hot Foot (RKO- Ben Holmes) Edgar Kennedy Comedy

Spook Louder (Columbia- Del Lord) Three Stooges Comedy

No News Is Good News (MGM- Will Jason) Robert Benchley Comedy

Plan For Destruction (MGM- Edward Cahn; narrator: Lewis Stone) Crime Does Not Pay

Young And Beautiful (Warner Bros.- Will Jason) Technicolor Special

Romantic Nevada (MGM- James A. FitzPatrick; camera: William Snyder) Traveltalk in Technicolor

At The Cage Door Canteen (Jerry Fairbanks/Paramount Lou Lilly; narrator: Ken Carpenter) Speaking Of Animals

Mardi Gras (Paramount- Walter MacEwen & Hugh Bennett) Technicolor Musical Parade

Flying Gunners (20th Century Fox- Jack Kuhne; narrator: George Putnam) Movietone Adventure in Technicolor

Duke Ellington & His Orchestra (RKO-Pathé- Jay Bonafield) RKO Jamboree

Fala (MGM- Gunther V. Fritsch) Pete Smith Specialty

Wings In Record Time (Universal- Thomas Mead & Joseph O'Brien; narrator: Al Grobe) Variety View #128

Biography Of A Red-winged Blackbird (Coronet Instructional- Dr. Arthur A. Allen) Kodachrome Instructional

 

(Animation)

 

Red Hot Riding Hood (MGM- Tex Avery) MGM Cartoon in Technicolor

A Corny Concerto (Leon Schlesinger/Warner Bros.- Robert Clampett) Merry Melody with Bugs Bunny, Elmer Fudd & Porky Pig in Technicolor

The Underground World (Famous Studios-Paramount- Seymour Kneitel) Superman Cartoon in Technicolor

Chicken Little (Walt Disney/RKO- Clyde Geronimi) Disney Special in Technicolor

Who Killed Who? (MGM- Tex Avery) MGM Cartoon in Technicolor

The 500 Hats Of Bartholemew Cubbins (George Pal/Paramount) George Pal Puppetoon in Technicolor

He Can't Make It Sick (Screen Gems/Columbia- Paul Sommer & John Hubley) Rhapsody in Technicolor

What's Buzzin' Buzzard? (MGM- Tex Avery) MGM Cartoon in Technicolor

Tin Pan Alley Cats (Leon Schlesinger/Warner Bros.- Robert Clampett) Merry Melody in Technicolor

An Itch In Time (Leon Schlesinger/Warner Bros.- Robert Clampett) Merry Melody w/ Elmer Fudd in Technicolor

Porky Pig's Feat (Leon Schlesinger/Warner Bros.- Frank Tashlin) Looney Tune w/ Daffy Duck & Porky Pig (and Bugs cameo) in black & white
One Ham's Family (MGM- Tex Avery) MGM Cartoon in Technicolor
Jack Wabbit And The Beanstalk (Leon Schlesinger/Warner Bros.- Friz Freleng) Merry Melody w/ Bugs Bunny in Technicolor

The Unbearable Bear (Leon Schlesinger/Warner Bros.- Chuck Jones) Merry Melody w/ Sniffles in Technicolor

The Yankee Doodle Mouse (MGM- William Hanna & Joseph Barbera) Tom & Jerry Cartoon in Technicolor

Wackiki Wabbit (Leon Schlesinger/Warner Bros.- Chuck Jones) Merry Melody w/ Bugs Bunny in Technicolor

Way Down In the Corn (Screen Gems/Columbia- Bob Wickersham) Fox & Crow Cartoon in Technicolor

Room And Bored (Screen Gems/Columbia- Bob Wickersham) Fox & Crow Cartoon in Technicolor

Ration Bored (Walter Lantz/Universal- Emery Hawkins & Milt Schaffer) Woody Woodpecker Cartoon in Technicolor

Coming Snafu (Leon Schlesinger/US Army Signal Corps- Chuck Jones & Theodore Geisel) Private Snafu in black & white

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