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What Should I See In STAR TREK?


Palmerin
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I watched ST when it ran on Puerto Rican TV, and found nothing special about it, except that Mr. Spook was very annoying with his pomposity and his incessant blather about logic. The other two shows had better leads in Stewart and Mulgrew--admittedly not much of an accomplishment--, but they, too, baffled me.

What should I see in ST?

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Remember the era in which the original series premiered, Palmerin. And era in which nuclear war between the superpowers of the USA and the Soviet Union was a possibility.

 

(...and then consider the thought that what that series suggested was a future in which the human race had learned to work together and prosper two hundred years later, and I think you'll see some of the draw to it)

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Btw Palmerin, and speaking of "what should you see in Star Trek's original series...

 

I CAN at least tell ya that what you WON'T see in the original series are Klingons with receding hairlines and those funky ridges on their foreheads, anyway.

 

(...but evidently sportin' facial hair, especially a "Van Dyke" style beard was ever-popular on that planet)

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Btw Palmerin, and speaking of "what should you see in Star Trek's original series...

 

I CAN at least tell ya that what you WON'T see in the original series are Klingons with receding hairlines and those funky ridges on their foreheads, anyway.

 

(...but evidently sportin' facial hair, especially a "Van Dyke" style beard was ever-popular on that planet)

 

An era they don't like to talk about (according to Lieutenant Worf).

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The even-numbered movies.

(Although, if you've seen "Wrath of Khan", and who hasn't, you've already seen JJ Abrams "Into Darkness".  Wow, was Abrams' sequel a franchise-killer.)


Remember the era in which the original series premiered, Palmerin. And era in which nuclear war between the superpowers of the USA and the Soviet Union was a possibility.

 

(...and then consider the thought that what that series suggested was a future in which the human race had learned to work together and prosper two hundred years later, and I think you'll see some of the draw to it)

 

Also, when we were in the middle of Vietnam, why would kids suddenly find spiritual guidance in a show that was essentially about joining the Navy?  Probably because it represented a future you could join to do good things, at a time when everyone else was shouting we he had to rebel against the past.

 

The episode where a group of "space hippies" hear Spock's Vulcan logic and think "Wow, that's mindblowing" kind of represents where we were in 1966--

If you couldn't Drop Out, the "hippie revolution" was Tolkien, "The Monkees" and Star Trek.

 

An era they don't like to talk about (according to Lieutenant Worf).

 

And the fourth season of Enterprise (when they were trying to get viewers back after the jumped-shark third season, by going back to stories tying into Classic-lore questions) explains why.


And green women with lots of eye makeup that get kissed.

 

As us Annoying Sticklers like to point out, there were only TWO "green alien females" in the entire Classic series, and Kirk only pretended to "make out" with one of them.  (The crazy Yvonne Craig one, when they needed to escape from the asylum.)

The other was an illusion, for Capt. Christopher Pike, a generation before Kirk was even on the ship.

 

Kirk's own tastes tended to prefer them blonde, Greek-statuesque, and generally in diaphanous gowns.

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I watched ST when it ran on Puerto Rican TV, and found nothing special about it, except that Mr. Spook was very annoying with his pomposity and his incessant blather about logic. The other two shows had better leads in Stewart and Mulgrew--admittedly not much of an accomplishment--, but they, too, baffled me.

What should I see in ST?

a strong no-nonsense leader in shatner as james kirk. a seeker of peace who understood the necessity of doing it from a position of strength.

 

original star trek was a reflection of the 1960s broken down like this.

 

the federation was the UN and starfleet was the united states of america and the overall good it represented.

 

that is the easiest way to explain star trek.

 

then we have next generation and the infusion of changing american societal mores and the heavy-handed infusion of political correctness...

 

the men dare not look at the women in anyway but a professional way and they all must where unisex pajamas so we all might be reminded that men and women are after all psychologically if not physically the same. :lol:

 

that about covers it. :)

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original star trek was a reflection of the 1960s broken down like this.

 

the federation was the UN and starfleet was the united states of america and the overall good it represented.

 

that is the easiest way to explain star trek.

 

You left out that Klingons = the Soviets and Romulans = Red China. The show also trafficked in heavy-handed statements about race, religion, youth culture, First World interference in Third World societies, and various governmental types. 

 

And Abraham Lincoln fighting Genghis Khan, because why not.

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The continuing efforts of ****dog James Tiberius Kirk to

control his sex addiction to **** just about everything

that moved, whether animal, vegetable, or mineral, with

a success rate of around 5%.

 

Remember the episode with the two battling aliens, who

were black on one side and white on the other, but they

were white and black on different sides. Even in the 1960s,

that was an eye roller.

 

And Harvey Mudd = Donald Trump.

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You're thinking of his brother Harvey, who went on to establish colleges.

 

The rest of us managed to remember Mudd's name:

It has been a number of years since I've watched the show.

But he still reminds me of Donny.

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And the fourth season of Enterprise (when they were trying to get viewers back after the jumped-shark third season, by going back to stories tying into Classic-lore questions) explains why.

 

As us Annoying Sticklers like to point out, there were only TWO "green alien females" in the entire Classic series, and Kirk only pretended to "make out" with one of them.  (The crazy Yvonne Craig one, when they needed to escape from the asylum.)

The other was an illusion, for Capt. Christopher Pike, a generation before Kirk was even on the ship.

 

Kirk's own tastes tended to prefer them blonde, Greek-statuesque, and generally in diaphanous gowns.

 

Nerd alert.

 

Just kidding. Star Trek was fun.

 

I never got into 'Enterprise' - kinda got burned out by 'Deep Space Nine'. So I have no idea why Klingons went through the goatee period without head ridges.

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Remember the episode with the two battling aliens, who

were black on one side and white on the other, but they

were white and black on different sides. Even in the 1960s,

that was an eye roller.

 

 

That was the controversial "Black/White Lives Matter" episode.

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I never got into 'Enterprise' - kinda got burned out by 'Deep Space Nine'. So I have no idea why Klingons went through the goatee period without head ridges.

 

Before Khan was exiled into space, the Klingons tried using the "Eugenics"' DNA to breed super-hybrids for their space fleet, but they ended up looking "too human".  There, that's as good an explanation as the series will give you.

 

(Nerds, maybe, but at least we don't make lame jokes about not knowing this stuff.)   B)

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Before Khan was exiled into space, the Klingons tried using the "Eugenics"' DNA to breed super-hybrids for their space fleet, but they ended up looking "too human".  There, that's as good an explanation as the series will give you.

 

(Nerds, maybe, but at least we don't make lame jokes about not knowing this stuff.)   B)

 

Thanks.

 

(Nerds tell lousy jokes, anyway.)

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Before Khan was exiled into space, the Klingons tried using the "Eugenics"' DNA to breed super-hybrids for their space fleet, but they ended up looking "too human".  There, that's as good an explanation as the series will give you.

 

(Nerds, maybe, but at least we don't make lame jokes about not knowing this stuff.)   B)

 

Worf said in one of the "Star Trek DS9" episodes that is something they don't like to discuss with outsiders.  He didn't went into details.

 

 

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I have never seen Star Trek.

 

Nope, not a single episode, nor any of the movies.

 

Kinda proud that I appear to be the only person on planet Earth who can make this claim. The rest of you have all been sucked into this sci fi phenomenon's orbit.

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I have never seen Star Trek.

 

Nope, not a single episode, nor any of the movies.

 

Kinda proud that I appear to be the only person on planet Earth who can make this claim. The rest of you have all been sucked into this sci fi force's orbit.

 

Well, YA KNOW what happens to people who've never watched Star Trek, either the TV series OR any of the movies, doncha Tom?!

 

(...uh-huh...they often develop an acute case coulrophobia they can never seem to shake) ;)

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Well, YA KNOW what happens to people who've never watched Star Trek, either the TV series OR any of the movies, doncha Tom?!

 

(...uh-huh...they often develop an acute case coulrophobia they can never seem to shake) ;)

 

Nah, you can't get me to watch a Star Trek episode by hitting me with that one, Dargo. That would make me a clown for believing you.

 

I shall remain ST pure.

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That was the controversial "Black/White Lives Matter" episode.

That's the one. As I recall it ended something like this.:

 

Spock: Logically, all lives matter, Captain.

 

Kirk: Once again Mr. Spock, you have stumbled upon the truth.

 

Spock: Thank you Captain, even though that could be the only

logical deduction.

 

Kirk: Whatever. You know, Mr. Spock, watching those two guys

running around, all wet and sweaty, has made me a little hot.

I'm going to my quarters and take a long cold shower and set

my phaser on hard as a rock. You take command of the bridge,

Spock.

 

Spock: Anything you say, Kirky babe.

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Nah, you can't get me to watch a Star Trek episode by hitting me with that one, Dargo. That would make me a clown for believing you.

 

I shall remain ST pure.

 

Okay, but rule is, you don't get to complain about any bad TV-series-to-movie adaptation if you haven't watched Trek Movie #2 (4 or 6 also acceptable) as setting the established bar for a good adaptation, and arguably the best.

 

You can have seen the Addams Family, Maverick, X-Files, Untouchables or first Mission: Impossible movies, but without at least Wrath of Khan, it won't matter.

 

Vautrin

Remember the episode with the two battling aliens, who

were black on one side and white on the other, but they

were white and black on different sides. Even in the 1960s,

that was an eye roller.

 

So it was.   :rolleyes: But the focus of the actual episode was on the fact that the two aliens somehow had complete control of the ship, and taken it hostage insisting that Kirk take one side of the battle, and Kirk's deeper control issues at no longer being captain--

It's the episode where we first see the ship's Auto Self-Destruct function being used, and the blink-faceoff of whether or how far Kirk will go through with it.

 

(Some of us actually DO remember these things, as you can only hear the same cheap joke so many times.)

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I have never seen Star Trek.

 

Nope, not a single episode, nor any of the movies.

 

Kinda proud that I appear to be the only person on planet Earth who can make this claim. The rest of you have all been sucked into this sci fi phenomenon's orbit.

 

I used to be able to say this about Star Wars until I got stuck at somebody's house for a socal event and one guy insisted on watching the original Star Wars on TV.

 

So I ended up seeing about 25 minutes of it. And I was absolutely fascinated.

 

Fascinated by how horrendous most of the acting was (aside from Guinness). It was like watching a 1970s industrial film.

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I have never seen Star Trek.

 

Nope, not a single episode, nor any of the movies.

 

Kinda proud that I appear to be the only person on planet Earth who can make this claim. The rest of you have all been sucked into this sci fi phenomenon's orbit.

 

Some "pride" comes pretty cheap.

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