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Diane Keaton receives AFI Life Achievement Award


jakeem
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Academy Award winner Diane Keaton, who has excelled in both film comedies and dramatic fare, will become the 45th recipient of the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award. Her career will be celebrated at an event to be held in Los Angeles on June 8, 2017. The AFI's annual tribute is traditionally televised later by TNT and Turner Classic Movies.

 

diane-keaton-warren-beatty-tribute.jpg

Keaton at the AFI tribute honoring her ex-boyfriend Warren Beatty in 2008

 

Keaton, 70, was an original cast member of the Broadway production of "Hair" in 1968. A year later, she won the lead female role in Woody Allen's stage comedy "Play It Again Sam" (she would later reprise the character in the 1972 film version).

 

She made her screen debut in the 1970 comedy "Lovers and Other Strangers," based on the play by Renée Taylor and Joseph Bologna. Her big breakthrough came when she was cast as Kay Adams Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's Oscar-winning crime drama "The Godfather" (1972). She also appeared in "The Godfather Part II" (1974) and "The Godfather Part III" (1990).

 

After co-starring with Allen in several comedies, Keaton won the 1977 Best Actress Oscar for her performance in his bittersweet film "Annie Hall." The romantic comedy won three other Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director (Allen) and Best Original Screenplay (Allen and Marshall Brickman).

 

The loopy title character was modeled after Keaton (her real name is Diane Hall). She went on to receive three other Oscar nominations -- all in the Best Actress category -- for her work in the films "Reds" (1981), "Marvin's Room" (1996) and "Something's Gotta Give" (2003).

 

Here is a list of the previous AFI honorees:

 
1973 John Ford 
1974 James Cagney 
1975 Orson Welles 
1976 William Wyler 
1977 Bette Davis (first female honoree)
1978 Henry Fonda (daughter Jane honored in 2014)
1979 Sir Alfred Hitchcock
1980 James Stewart
1981 Fred Astaire 
1982 Frank Capra 
1983 John Huston 
1984 Lillian Gish (oldest honoree at 90)
1985 Gene Kelly 
1986 Billy Wilder 
1987 Barbara Stanwyck 
1988 Jack Lemmon 
1989 Gregory Peck 
1990 Sir David Lean 
1991 Kirk Douglas (son Michael honored in 2009)
1992 Sidney Poitier (first African-American honoree)
1993 Elizabeth Taylor 
1994 Jack Nicholson 
1995 Steven Spielberg 
1996 Clint Eastwood 
1997 Martin Scorsese 
1998 Robert Wise 
1999 Dustin Hoffman 
2000 Harrison Ford 
2001 Barbra Streisand 
2002 Tom Hanks (youngest honoree at 45)
2003 Robert De Niro 
2004 Meryl Streep 
2005 George Lucas
2006 Sir Sean Connery
2007 Al Pacino 
2008 Warren Beatty (sister Shirley MacLaine honored in 2012)
2009 Michael Douglas (father Kirk honored in 1991)
2010 Mike Nichols
2011 Morgan Freeman
2012 Shirley MacLaine (brother Warren Beatty honored in 2008)
2013 Mel Brooks (first honoree known primarily for comedy)
2014 Jane Fonda (father Henry honored in 1978)
2015 Steve Martin
2016 John Williams (first composer honored)
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2016/10/06/diane-keaton-receive-afi-life-achievement-award/91692402/
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Academy Award winner Diane Keaton, who has excelled in both film comedies and dramatic fare, will become the 45th recipient of the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award. Her career will be celebrated at an event to be held in Los Angeles on June 8, 2017. The AFI's annual tribute is traditionally televised later by TNT and Turner Classic Movies.

 

81548424.jpg

Keaton at the AFI tribute honoring ex-boyfriend Warren Beatty in 2008

 

Keaton, 70, was an original cast member of the Broadway production of "Hair" in 1968. A year later, she won the lead female role in Woody Allen's stage comedy "Play It Again Sam" (she would later reprise the character in the 1972 film version).

 

She made her screen debut in the 1970 comedy "Lovers and Other Strangers," based on the play by Renée Taylor and Joseph Bologna. Her big breakthrough came when she was cast as Kay Adams Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's Oscar-winning crime drama "The Godfather" (1972). She also appeared in "The Godfather Part II" (1974) and "The Godfather III" (1990).

 

After co-starring with Allen in several comedies, Keaton won the 1977 Best Actress Oscar for her performance in his bittersweet film "Annie Hall." The romantic comedy won three other Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director (Allen) and Best Original Screenplay (Allen and Marshall Brickman).

 

The loopy title character was modeled after Keaton (her real name is Diane Hall). She went on to receive three other Oscar nominations -- all in the Best Actress category -- for her work in the films "Reds" (1981), "Marvin's Room" (1996) and "Something's Gotta Give" (2003).

 

Here is a list of the previous AFI honorees:

 
1973 John Ford 
1974 James Cagney 
1975 Orson Welles 
1976 William Wyler 
1977 Bette Davis (first woman honoree)
1978 Henry Fonda (daughter Jane honored in 2014)
1979 Sir Alfred Hitchcock
1980 James Stewart
1981 Fred Astaire 
1982 Frank Capra 
1983 John Huston 
1984 Lillian Gish (oldest honoree at 90)
1985 Gene Kelly 
1986 Billy Wilder 
1987 Barbara Stanwyck 
1988 Jack Lemmon 
1989 Gregory Peck 
1990 Sir David Lean 
1991 Kirk Douglas (son Michael honored in 2009)
1992 Sidney Poitier (first African-American honoree)
1993 Elizabeth Taylor 
1994 Jack Nicholson 
1995 Steven Spielberg 
1996 Clint Eastwood 
1997 Martin Scorsese 
1998 Robert Wise 
1999 Dustin Hoffman 
2000 Harrison Ford 
2001 Barbra Streisand 
2002 Tom Hanks (youngest honoree at 45)
2003 Robert De Niro 
2004 Meryl Streep 
2005 George Lucas
2006 Sir Sean Connery
2007 Al Pacino 
2008 Warren Beatty (sister Shirley MacLaine honored in 2012)
2009 Michael Douglas (father Kirk honored in 1991)
2010 Mike Nichols
2011 Morgan Freeman
2012 Shirley MacLaine (brother Warren Beatty honored in 2008)
2013 Mel Brooks (first honoree known primarily for comedy)
2014 Jane Fonda (father Henry honored in 1978)
2015 Steve Martin
2016 John Williams (first composer honored)
 

 

GREAT WORK JAKEEM!

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Keaton also has dabbled in directing and producing during the past couple of decades. In 1987, she directed the music video for "Heaven Is a Place on Earth," a No. 1 hit song for Belinda Carlisle.

 

 

 

She followed that in 1988 with "I Get Weak," another video for Carlisle, the former lead singer of the female rock band The Go-Go's. The song, written by Diane Warren, peaked at No. 2 on Billboard's pop chart.

 

 

 

Keaton also directed the 2000 film comedy "Hanging Up," in which she co-starred with Meg Ryan and Lisa Kudrow. It featured the final screen appearance of Oscar-winner Walter Matthau, who died at the age of 79 on July 1, 2000 -- five months after the picture was released.

 

Hanging-Up-images-32c279f7-dcac-4505-923

Keaton, Ryan and Kudrow co-starred as sisters in the 2000 comedy "Hanging Up"

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  • 7 months later...

Don't forget Keaton's fantastic writing talent too. I've read all her books and her writing style is as delectable as her personality. Man, she must have a painting in her attic that ages for her, she looks terrific.

 

Super talented lady, what a caree r- very deserving.

 

1992 Sidney Poitier (first African-American honoree)

 

ONLY black honoree on that list.

(Poitier is from the Caribbean, not Africa nor America)

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Don't forget Keaton's fantastic writing talent too. I've read all her books and her writing style is as delectable as her personality. Man, she must have a painting in her attic that ages for her, she looks terrific.

 

Super talented lady, what a caree r- very deserving.

 

1992 Sidney Poitier (first African-American honoree)

 

ONLY black honoree on that list.

(Poitier is from the Caribbean, not Africa nor America)

 

Sidney Poitier was born in Miami, which makes him an American citizen.

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Good point about Poitier, TIKI.

 

My wife was recently in the hospital getting her PEG-tube replaced, and a nurse assistant in the "short stay" wing she was in was named MKoth( with a "long" o).  I mentioned the uniqueness of her name and she said (with a noticable accent) that she was from Nigeria.  We got to talking a bit and she brought up something I thought was interesting.   "I came to this country 10 years ago.  I have passed my citizenship exam and was sworn in as an American citizen.  Yet, I'm STILL called "African-American".  How long MUST one be a citizen until they are just known as "American"?

 

She looked puzzled for a bit when I laughed and said, "Hell, I was BORN in this country, and people STILL refer to me as "POLISH-American!"   I went on to explain I too, thought it odd and that most Americans don't often put  "American" first until they want to show how "patriotic" they are. 

 

She relaxed and felt better when I assured her I wasn't making fun of her and that her point was one we BOTH saw "eye-to-eye" on.  :)

 

 

As for KEATON, well deserving of the acknowledgement.  I do know many who STILL don't realize it was her as Pacino's wife in THE GODFATHER, and only are familiar with a few of her roles in Woody Allen flicks.  They didn't like her in THOSE, and so refuse to see ANYTHING ELSE she's ever worked in.  But, having first read the novel, I thought Ms. Keaton's portrayal of Theresa Dunn in LOOKING FOR MR. GOODBAR was perfection. 

 

 

Sepiatone

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How long MUST one be a citizen until they are just known as "American"?

 

Black people were in America before the Mayflower arrived, and they had to put up with names (i.e. "Negro" and "colored") that were conferred on them by whites. At least African-American is a term that many blacks prefer.

 

Poitier is an African-American citizen because he is of African heritage and was born in the United States. He also has Bahamian citizenship.

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Black people were in America before the Mayflower arrived, and they had to put up with names (i.e. "Negro" and "colored") that were conferred on them by whites. At least African-American is a term that many blacks prefer.

 

Poitier is an African-American citizen because he is of African heritage and was born in the United States. He also has Bahamian citizenship.

 

That's just a Pavlovian academic posture on the matter.

 

I am of Polish heritage and was born in the United States.  However, I usually think of myself as AMERICAN first.  American born, raised, educated and employed in America and pay American income taxes.  The closest I've ever been to Poland is when I venture into Hamtramck and have dinner at Polonius.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatonicz  :D

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Black people were in America before the Mayflower arrived, and they had to put up with names (i.e. "Negro" and "colored") that were conferred on them by whites. At least African-American is a term that many blacks prefer.

 

Poitier is an African-American citizen because he is of African heritage and was born in the United States. He also has Bahamian citizenship.

 

I've been a big fan of Sidney's all my life. And I always knew that he was born in Miami, but I was still surprised to see that he had dual citizenship.

 

I found that out a few years back when I saw that he was the Ambassador to Japan from the Bahamas and knighted by the Queen of Great Britain.

 

So now I guess we'll have to say to Sir, Sir Sidney with Love.

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Black people were in America before the Mayflower arrived, and they had to put up with names (i.e. "Negro" and "colored") that were conferred on them by whites. At least African-American is a term that many blacks prefer.

 

Poitier is an African-American citizen because he is of African heritage and was born in the United States. He also has Bahamian citizenship.

let me know when you can peddle africans being here even before native americans. :lol:

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let me know when you can peddle africans being here even before native americans. :lol:

 

Nip-- this is basic American history that you should have been taught in grade school-- we had it in the 8th grade.

 

The first permanent English settlement in America was Jamestown, May 4, 1607. In August of 1619, approximately 20 Africans from Angola arrived from a pirated ship to be sold as slaves. Historians believe these people to be both literate and Christian at the time.

 

 

On November 11th, 1620, the Mayflower anchored at Cape Cod.

 

If you want to know more about all this you can read a classic history book by Lerone Bennett: "Before the Mayflower", 1962.

 

Bennett was an associate editor of Ebony Magazine and one of the most sought after and popular black historians of the latter part of the twentieth century.

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1992 Sidney Poitier (first African-American honoree)

 

 

 

ONLY black honoree on that list.

 

 

 

 

 

Don't forget 2011 honoree Morgan Freeman.

 

 

 

Oops-thanks for catching that....I had missed seeing him on the list!

 

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 At least African-American is a term that many blacks prefer.

 

 

 

For NOW at least.

 

Both my Grandmother and George Carlin made a similar observation.  My Grandmother told me once that back in the 1920's and '30's and even later that Black people considered it an insult  to be called "black" and preferred "colored".  Then one day, it changed.  Then a little later it changed BACK.  And then a little after THAT it changed AGAIN.  She said she got tired of trying to keep up and......

 

"Instead of trying to remember whether to call them "black" people or "colored" people  I thought it best just to think of them as PEOPLE  and interact with them on THAT level."

 

CARLIN quipped, "For a couple of weeks it was "AFRO-American", but they got tired of IT and went back to "black".  So I guess the REAL saying should be...Once you go BLACK, you'll KEEP COMING back!"  ;)

 

Like my Grandmother, I never really understood racial bigotry.  It seemed to me THEN and STILL to be the epitome of stupidity.

 

 

Sepiatone

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For NOW at least.

 

Both my Grandmother and George Carlin made a similar observation.  My Grandmother told me once that back in the 1920's and '30's and even later that Black people considered it an insult  to be called "black" and preferred "colored".  Then one day, it changed.  Then a little later it changed BACK.  And then a little after THAT it changed AGAIN.  She said she got tired of trying to keep up and......

 

"Instead of trying to remember whether to call them "black" people or "colored" people  I thought it best just to think of them as PEOPLE  and interact with them on THAT level."

 

CARLIN quipped, "For a couple of weeks it was "AFRO-American", but they got tired of IT and went back to "black".  So I guess the REAL saying should be...Once you go BLACK, you'll KEEP COMING back!"  ;)

 

Like my Grandmother, I never really understood racial bigotry.  It seemed to me THEN and STILL to be the epitome of stupidity.

 

 

Yeah? Well, it must be nice to be so pigmentally challenged that you can become an assimilated American -- and not have to worry about anything else.

 

After 400 years in this country of being called everthing in the book except children of God, blacks have earned the right to call themselves whatever they like. 

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Yeah? Well, it must be nice to be so pigmentally challenged that you can become an assimilated American -- and not have to worry about anything else.

 

After 400 years in this country of being called everthing in the book except children of God, blacks have earned the right to call themselves whatever they like. 

exactly. it was all hyper-sensitive politically correct HS.

 

call me the wrong term and you're a racist.

 

alotta white people over the decades simply got tired of this brand of phony HS. :)

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exactly. it was all hyper-sensitive politically correct HS.

 

call me the wrong term and you're a racist.

 

alotta white people over the decades just got tired of the phony HS. :)

 

And look at what that's gotten us. More phony HS!  :ph34r:

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Yeah? Well, it must be nice to be so pigmentally challenged that you can become an assimilated American -- and not have to worry about anything else.

 

After 400 years in this country of being called everthing in the book except children of God, blacks have earned the right to call themselves whatever they like. 

I agree.  But what they call THEMSELVES isn't the issue here.  Rather, how they're referred by others.  And if the game AND it's "rules" are constantly changing it will get to a point( already reached,  I feel) where nobody will CARE anymore and take it upon theirselves to call them whatever THEY wish.

 

My initial point is that if you were BORN in America, raised, educated and make both your home and livlihood in America, THAT makes you an AMERICAN first, and anything else is peripheral.

 

Like, I consider myself to be an AMERICAN of Polish descent.  Not POLISH-American.  And so I see nothing wrong in black people saying they're AMERICAN of African descent.  Or Ugandan descent, or Angolan descent, if indeed they're  aware of that specific.

 

I for one am TIRED of being "put upon" by those whiny PC weenies who insist that I  have some convoluted arbitrary obligation to be tactful of other's oversensitivity to such things, or being hyper apologetic over something I or NONE of MY ancestors had any part of.  I treat ALL people equally right up to the point they show me they're not deserving of it. THEN it's a purely personality  thing.  NOT a race or ethnic thing.

 

BTW--400 years ago the first Africans to hit the North American continent's soil were acquired from SPANISH  African slave traders and were first considered "indentured servants" rather than slaves.  And they worked along side many WHITE "indentured servants".  The "slave" trade in the colonies didn't get into full swing until the early 18th century.

 

The first culture to use captured and imprisoned black Africans and sell them as slaves were the early Muslims, which always made me wonder WHY Americans of African descent gravitated towards Islam as a strongly followed faith.

 

 

Sepiatone

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My initial point is that if you were BORN in America, raised, educated and make both your home and livlihood in America, THAT makes you an AMERICAN first, and anything else is peripheral.

 

It's the peripheral stuff that's the fun part. Black Americans can't just think of themselves as Americans because of what the great W.E.B. Du Bois called "double consciousness." It was true when he wrote that in the early 20th century. It's true now in this era of so-called "American carnage."

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For NOW at least.

 

Both my Grandmother and George Carlin made a similar observation. My Grandmother told me once that back in the 1920's and '30's and even later that Black people considered it an insult to be called "black" and preferred "colored". Then one day, it changed. Then a little later it changed BACK. And then a little after THAT it changed AGAIN. She said she got tired of trying to keep up and......

 

"Instead of trying to remember whether to call them "black" people or "colored" people I thought it best just to think of them as PEOPLE and interact with them on THAT level."

 

CARLIN quipped, "For a couple of weeks it was "AFRO-American", but they got tired of IT and went back to "black". So I guess the REAL saying should be...Once you go BLACK, you'll KEEP COMING back!" ;)

 

Like my Grandmother, I never really understood racial bigotry. It seemed to me THEN and STILL to be the epitome of stupidity.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

 

Terminology about black people has to do with slavery. When the white slave master would rape the black female slave and she would become pregnant and have his children--

 

he did not want to be responsible for those mixed race children. So it became a societal rule that anyone who was with one ounce of black blood, then would be designated by the government to be a black person.

 

That made it easier, in every way, for the white slave master to sell his own mixed-race children down the river because, after all, they were not white people-- they weren't mixed-race--they were black.

 

The American government on whatever level would characterize all progeny from the white slave masters as black people.

 

It's important here to realize that the government, at every level, is assigning these terms to people in the Census count and on birth certificates.

 

Whatever the terminology the government would use in that particular era - -

it was made very clear that anyone who was mixed race, i.e. it's the one drop of black blood or DNA, had to be designated as a black person.

 

This was done in order to free the white slave master from accountability for his own mixed-race children and for accountability to rape.

 

Just step back a moment and think about this--

 

these white slave owners were selling their own children and they didn't have any love for them-- certainly not Thomas Jefferson, in this case, but maybe a couple of other presidents.

 

I can think of two Classic Hollywood movies that describe both of these situations that we've all seen.

 

Thr musical Showboat would be one example of how the one drop rule worked in the old days. It may look like a hokey silly movie now, but that was the way people were treated.

 

This next movie will be in line with someone we've been talking about--

Sidney Poitier. The Warner Brothers movie Band of Angels starring Clark Gable and Sidney Poitier is all about the subject of mixed-race people who can pass for white-- but their birth came from a white slave owner having sex with a black slave.

 

When it starts we have a plantation being sold in the Deep South because the slave owner has died. As all of the property, including the home and the slaves are being sold, his beloved white daughter gets the shock of her life--

she is sold at the auction, just like the black slaves.

 

Clark Gable is at the auction and he sees her situation--how there are a number of white wealthy "gentlemen" who want to buy her to probably sexually assault her-- so he buys her himself to save her from that.

 

And if you haven't seen the rest of the movie, I don't want to spoil it because it's a good one.

 

Oh, by the way - - Hollywood selected Yvonne De Carlo to play the white, black girl. LOL

 

Black historians and sociologists like WEB Dubois knew that it was a very complicated and complex issue to explain how American slavery had distorted and brutalized black people in the United States.

 

Black people have been manipulated and discriminated against and insulted and had their personhood attacked on every level.

 

So today, they certainly have a right to declare, as everyone has in a free Society, what there true identification is.

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