Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Actress Patricia Barry (1922-2016)


jakeem
 Share

Recommended Posts

Actress Patricia Barry, a familiar film and television presence whose career stretched from the 1940s to the 2010s, has died a month shy of her 94th birthday. She was a founding member and a past president of Women in Film, the nonprofit advocacy organization involved in the "Trailblazing Women" series currently airing on Turner Classic Movies.

 

She appeared in more than 130 film and television productions during her career.

 

Barry, who was born Patricia Allen White in Davenport Iowa on November 16, 1922, made her screen debut in the uncredited role of a showgirl in the 1946 crime drama "Her Kind of Man." She began using the last name Barry after her marriage in 1950 to Philip Barry, Jr., son of the playwright who wrote "Holiday" and "The Philadelphia Story." The union lasted until her husband's death in 1998. They had two daughters.

 

Among her other film appearances: "Humoresque" (1946), "The Beast With Five Fingers " (1946), "Cry Wolf" (1947), "The Man I Love" (1947), "The Undercover Man" (1949), "The Tattooed Stranger" (1950), "Safe at Home" (1962, with Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris), "Dear Heart" (1964), "Kitten with a Whip" (1964), "Send Me No Flowers" (1964), "The Marriage of a Young Stockbroker" (1971) and "Sea of Love" (1989). Her final film was the 2014 thriller "Delusional."

 

1476304737285.jpg

Barry with Fred MacMurray in a 1960s episode of his TV series "My Three Sons"

 

One of her memorable film appearances was in the "It's a Good Life" segment of "Twilight Zone: The Movie" (1983). In that installment, directed by Joe Dante, she played a member of a family menaced by Anthony (Jeremy Licht), a young boy with magical powers. The segment was a remake of a 1961 episode -- also titled "It's a Good Life" -- of Rod Serling's CBS anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959-1965).

 

 

Barry appeared in two episodes of "The Twilight Zone": "The Chaser" (1960, with George Grizzard) and "I Dream of Genie" (1963, with Howard Morris).

 

Barry began working regularly in television in the 1950s. As a result, there probably are few shows in which she didn't make a guest appearance. She received Emmy Award nominations for her performances in episodes of "Suspense" (1954), "Matinee Theatre" (1957) and "Startime" (1959).

 

During the 1964-65 television season, she co-starred with Jack Klugman in the NBC sitcom "Harris Against the World." The comedy was one of three half-hour shows grouped under the umbrella title "90 Bristol Court" on Monday nights. The other shows: "Karen" (the adventures of a teen girl that featured a theme song by The Beach Boys) and "Tom Dick and Mary" (about newlyweds who agree to let a friend live with them). All three series were set at the same apartment complex.

 

 She also acted in daytime dramas, including "Days of Our Lives" (1972-1973), "All My Children" (1981) and "Guiding Light" (1985-1987).

 

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/people/2016/10/12/days-our-lives-star-patricia-barry-dies-93/91960338/

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the bio.  Is there a reason you have an interest in her?

 

If you've ever watched old TV shows from the '50s, '60s and '70s, then you've likely seen some of her performances. She was one durable actress.

 

I'm also impressed by her work with Women in Film, which is concerned with promoting equal opportunities for women in the entertainment and communications industries. 

 

And I have fond memories of her from the 1962 Disney film "Sammy, the Way-Out Seal," in which she co-starred with Robert Culp, Jack Carson (in his last picture), Elisabeth Fraser, Michael McGreevey, Billy Mumy and Ann Jillian. TCM will show it in the early morning hours of December 22nd as part of the "Treasures from the Disney Vault" series.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actress Patricia Barry, a familiar film and television presence whose career stretched from the 1940s to the 2010s, has died a month shy of her 94th birthday. She was a founding member and a past president of Women in Film, the nonprofit advocacy organization involved in the "Trailblazing Women" series currently airing on Turner Classic Movies.

 

She appeared in more than 130 film and television productions during her career.

 

Barry, who was born Patricia Allen White in Davenport Iowa on November 16, 1922, made her screen debut in the uncredited role of a showgirl in the 1946 crime drama "Her Kind of Man." She began using the last name Barry after her marriage in 1950 to Philip Barry, Jr., son of the playwright who wrote "Holiday" and "The Philadelphia Story." The union lasted until her husband's death in 1998. They had two daughters.

 

Among her other film appearances: "Humoresque" (1946), "The Beast With Five Fingers " (1946), "Cry Wolf" (1947), "The Man I Love" (1947), "The Undercover Man" (1949), "The Tattooed Stranger" (1950), "Safe at Home" (1962, with Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris), "Dear Heart" (1964), "Kitten with a Whip" (1964), "Send Me No Flowers" (1964), "The Marriage of a Young Stockbroker" (1971) and "Sea of Love" (1989). Her final film was the 2014 thriller "Delusional."

 

1476304737285.jpg

Barry with Fred MacMurray in a 1960s episode of his TV series "My Three Sons"

 

One of her memorable film appearances was in the "It's a Good Life" segment of "Twilight Zone: The Movie" (1983). In that installment, directed by Joe Dante, she played a member of a family menaced by Anthony (Jeremy Licht), a young boy with magical powers. The segment was a remake of a 1961 episode -- also titled "It's a Good Life" -- of Rod Serling's CBS anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959-1965).

 

 

Barry appeared in two episodes of "The Twilight Zone": "The Chaser" (1960, with George Grizzard) and "I Dream of Genie" (1963, with Howard Morris).

 

Barry began working regularly in television in the 1950s. As a result, there probably are few shows in which she didn't make a guest appearance. She received Emmy Award nominations for her performances in episodes of "Suspense" (1954), "Matinee Theatre" (1957) and "Startime" (1959).

 

 She also acted in daytime dramas, including "Days of Our Lives" (1972-1973), "All My Children" (1981) and "Guiding Light" (1985-1987).

 

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/people/2016/10/12/days-our-lives-star-patricia-barry-dies-93/91960338/

 

LONG LIFE!!!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Patricia Barry was Errol Flynn's last leading lady, having appeared with him in his last acting assignment, The Golden Shanty, a half hour TV western comedy from Alcoa Theatre broadcast after the actor's 1959 death. Twelve years earlier she had also had a small role in a Flynn film, Cry Wolf.

 

ce0eff107898d68dd1a2df654a39563f.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Soap opera fans probably remember Patricia Barry best as Addie Horton on Days of Our Lives. Question, guys: if you were a soap opera leading man (Doug Hayes), what would you do if the beautiful woman (Susan Seaforth Hayes) you loved and who was going to leave her husband for you wanted to bring along her young son? Answer: 1) You would reject her bringing along her son as being unfair to her husband and 2) would promptly marry her mother (Patricia Barry). Patricia Barry, Doug Hayes, and Susan Seaforth (soon to become Mrs. Hayes IRL) gave committed performances to this less than probable storyline.

 

Some years later, Patricia Barry also had fun playing an international villain known as Cobra on All My Children.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

She was equally good at comedy and drama, in season 2, she did two Maverick episodes which showed this.  In the first she falls for an innocent Bart and kills her husband in a hunting "accident" but suspicion falls on him.  She tries to use this to keep him but when it doesn't work she turns on him.  The Sheriff thinks they were in it together and tries to get her to say so but by then she is insane.  This was much more dramatic than the series usual stories and she was very convincing.  A few shows later she was a conniving businesswoman who pits the brothers against each other so she can profit from whomever gets a payoff first and was a perfect comic foil for both.  (CoziTV  is running this season now so you can see for yourself.)

 

I saw that Errol Flynn Alcoa episode. I've seen Cry Wolf but don't remember seeing her in it, now I'll have to watch for her.  I also remember a GE Theater episode, "Up Jumped the Devil", in which Satan tries to get her character to run away with him because of her famous devil's food cake.  She refuses and in the end we find her husband is an angel who left Heaven because he'd heard about her angel food cake, tasted one and decided to stay on Earth.  Ronald Reagan was the angel and I think Mr. Flynn was the devil.  It was fun nonsense.  Another redhead who made her mark, we might be rarer and thought less glamorous than blondes or brunettes but we've got quality.  RIP, Lady, and thanks for all your great work.    

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear. She had a long career in films and television. A great beauty. And she still looked great the last time I saw her (some film with Al Pacino and Ellen Barkin) maybe 20 years ago... Sea of Love, I guess it was.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear. She had a long career in films and television. A great beauty. And she still looked great the last time I saw her (some film with Al Pacino and Ellen Barkin) maybe 20 years ago... Sea of Love, I guess it was.

Wasn't she playing the slightly older lady who met up with Pacino at the restaurant for a blind date, and later threw wine in his face? She was always memorable in any part and my favorite is an episode called "The Chaser" with George Grizzard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wasn't she playing the slightly older lady who met up with Pacino at the restaurant for a blind date, and later threw wine in his face? She was always memorable in any part and my favorite is an episode called "The Chaser" with George Grizzard.

 

Yes, that was her. A small part, but she made a big impact. (and looked GREAT).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, that was her. A small part, but she made a big impact. (and looked GREAT).

In her early films, she was the typical glamourpuss but she really hit her stride in the 1950's on tv, due to her comedic abilities and feminine charm. And that southern drawl didn't hurt. Yes, she was still very attractive in Sea of Love as you say. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're also talking about her on the Alfred Hitchcock Hour thread as she did a lot of work for him. 

 

I recall her from only one thing - but it was something I have never forgotten. It scared me silly when I was 11 years old. Back then, I didn't sleep all night after watching this particular episode of 'Thriller' - the Boris Karloff hosted anthology series. My friends of the time had the same reaction - we were actually shivering as we discussed it the next day.

 

It was called 'A Wig for Miss Devore'. It's reputed to be the most remembered episode of the 'Thriller' series. It's the only one I've remembered for more than 5 decades - and the only role I think of at the mention of Patricia Barry.

 

Here it is, if you've never seen it.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Patricia Barry was Errol Flynn's last leading lady, having appeared with him in his last acting assignment, The Golden Shanty, a half hour TV western comedy from Alcoa Theatre broadcast after the actor's 1959 death. Twelve years earlier she had also had a small role in a Flynn film, Cry Wolf.

 

ce0eff107898d68dd1a2df654a39563f.jpg

GOOD FIND & SHOT IN FINDING THAT SAD IMAGE OF FLYNN< obviously towards the end of his 50yrs & ironically, looking more & more like his old pal John Barrymore

Link to comment
Share on other sites

GOOD FIND & SHOT IN FINDING THAT SAD IMAGE OF FLYNN< obviously towards the end of his 50yrs & ironically, looking more & more like his old pal John Barrymore

He stayed at the legendary "GARDEN OF ALLAH"-9now of course also gone) & 1 day noticed a young *J. Woodward at the pool  but as she still puts it, she had no idea this was Errol Flynn by then, almost unrecognizable & kinda' starting hitting on her a bit, but she went back to her room, then the following day she tried to go out to the pool & he was literally sitting outside her room & had his feet up, blocking her way out. She later told *Paul Newman, who almost immediately confronted Flynn about this & errol apologized & so on & all 3 became fast friends, that is until he went in 1959.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you've ever watched old TV shows from the '50s, '60s and '70s, then you've likely seen some of her performances. She was one durable actress.

 

I'm also impressed by her work with Women in Film, which is concerned with promoting equal opportunities for women in the entertainment and communications industries. 

 

And I have fond memories of her from the 1962 Disney film "Sammy, the Way-Out Seal," in which she co-starred with Robert Culp, Jack Carson (in his last picture), Elisabeth Fraser, Michael McGreevey, Billy Mumy and Ann Jillian. TCM will show it in the early morning hours of December 22nd as part of the "Treasures from the Disney Vault" series.

 

 

 

This is OT (sorta) but I have to say that I was really impressed with Robert Culp. A sort of textbook actor's workshop. Nothing spectacular but I recall L.Oliver once saying that either a costume or a prop or something like that did wonders for him to get into character. The antithesis of that is just being regular like Robert in this little scene. Reminds me of the type of things they teach in beginning actor's studios. Difficult to sink into something so everyday. Reactions and laughing, etc.

 

Patricia was fine too but she was locked in to a humorous but monotone persona didn't allow her in real range.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recall her from only one thing - but it was something I have never forgotten. It scared me silly when I was 11 years old. Back then, I didn't sleep all night after watching this particular episode of 'Thriller' - the Boris Karloff hosted anthology series. My friends of the time had the same reaction - we were actually shivering as we discussed it the next day.

 

It was called 'A Wig for Miss Devore'. It's reputed to be the most remembered episode of the 'Thriller' series. It's the only one I've remembered for more than 5 decades - and the only role I think of at the mention of Patricia Barry.

 

Here it is, if you've never seen it.

 

 

 

Liked it. This would have a mighty impact for a youth, I remember seeing Thriller too, can't remember what night it was, either a Fri or a Sun (maybe). Patricia was quite good. I wanted Boris to say in the intro "... this is a thrill-ah." but not this time. In the fourth and last part I had a frisson when Annabelle Foote tore off the wig. (spoiler avoided)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Liked it. This would have a mighty impact for a youth, I remember seeing Thriller too, can't remember what night it was, either a Fri or a Sun (maybe). Patricia was quite good. I wanted Boris to say in the intro "... this is a thrill-ah." but not this time. In the fourth and last part I had a frisson when Annabelle Foote tore off the wig. (spoiler avoided)

 

Didn't realize that there's a "Thriller" marathon this weekend -- how appropriate for the season! -- on the Decades TV Network. I've already watched a Season 1 episode starring Patricia Barry, Richard Anderson and Rip Torn. And there's apparently one more Barry episode airing tomorrow! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...