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Horror Cinema's Scariest Children!

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Did you ever read his book on his life in Hollywood - "Coreyography"?

 

No. I haven't.

 

I realized after my earlier post that probably the reason he was in a hurry all the time was because West Hollywood has very strict parking ordinances. You need a special (costly) permit and you are only allowed 20 minutes in front of a building on most streets. You have to move your vehicle often if you park on the street.

 

The police come through on periodic "sweeps" to ticket. And then the tow trucks come along later to take and impound the vehicles that still haven't been moved and are in violation of the ordinances. So he was probably rushing and distracted about getting a ticket or getting towed. Most people park in the underground garages. I would usually meet celebrities who were not in a rush walking their dog like I was.

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Nobody seemed interested in my post about Corey Feldman - he was cast as little Tommy Jarvis in "Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter".

 

And the franchise chose a child to kill off Jason Voorhees!

 

Given the violent nature of the franchise, I find it very interesting that the filmmakers chose a little boy to kill off such a maniacal creature.

 

Perhaps that choice seemed really and truly SCARY.

 

The producers realized that, despite the R-ratings, the main audience for the Friday the 13th films were young teenage boys. Not only that, but by the mid-80's, horror movies effects were at their peak, thanks to magazines like Fangoria, and many of the FX artists were treated like rock stars, with their names being mentioned as prominently in the advertising as the film's stars or director. It was common for young film wannabe's to dream of being the next Rick Baker or Tom Savini rather than an actor or other filmmaker.

 

So it seemed natural to have the hero who finally bests Jason be a young man (like the majority of the audience) and a gifted horror make up artist, too!

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Yes, I agree with you, the children aren't being controlled by the ghosts, but the ghosts are ever-present in their minds and lives.

 

You do have to wonder, though - if the uncle had cared about the children, and been deeply involved in their lives, would there had been a Peter Quint and a Miss Jessel?

 

The fact that Jack Clayton got Michael Redgrave to play the part causes me to think that Jack Clayton laid a lot of blame at the uncle's doorstep.

 

Not only in terms of the children's long and on-going neglect but in terms of the governess' need to make an impression on the uncle.

 

Perhaps he is the real "villain" of the piece.  

That's a very interesting way to look at it. I hadn't thought about it before, but I think you are right, the kids need someone to fill that place in their life, someone to care about them like they wanted their uncle to do. In his absence they relied on Quint and Miss Jessel, then they had to rely on one another until the new governess came (you can tell how attached Flora and Miles are to one another, especially at the beginning), and when she began acting strangely towards them and being overly suspicious and less loving, the children had to rely on the memories of Quint and Miss Jessel. Flora enjoyed listening to the music box and dancing because it reminded her of the happy times she had with her affectionate first governess; both of them seem to be in need of attention, in the scene where Miles yells at Flora because she is "begging for attention", both children are really fighting over who will get the governess's attention. And again, when Miles goes walking barefoot in the garden, he just want the governess to notice him.

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The producers realized that, despite the R-ratings, the main audience for the Friday the 13th films were young teenage boys. Not only that, but by the mid-80's, horror movies effects were at their peak, thanks to magazines like Fangoria, and many of the FX artists were treated like rock stars, with their names being mentioned as prominently in the advertising as the film's stars or director. It was common for young film wannabe's to dream of being the next Rick Baker or Tom Savini rather than an actor or other filmmaker.

 

So it seemed natural to have the hero who finally bests Jason be a young man (like the majority of the audience) and a gifted horror make up artist, too!

That decision has always puzzled me, but your explanation sounds reasonable.

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That's a very interesting way to look at it. I hadn't thought about it before, but I think you are right, the kids need someone to fill that place in their life, someone to care about them like they wanted their uncle to do. In his absence they relied on Quint and Miss Jessel, then they had to rely on one another until the new governess came (you can tell how attached Flora and Miles are to one another, especially at the beginning), and when she began acting strangely towards them and being overly suspicious and less loving, the children had to rely on the memories of Quint and Miss Jessel. Flora enjoyed listening to the music box and dancing because it reminded her of the happy times she had with her affectionate first governess; both of them seem to be in need of attention, in the scene where Miles yells at Flora because she is "begging for attention", both children are really fighting over who will get the governess's attention. And again, when Miles goes walking barefoot in the garden, he just want the governess to notice him.

It's an endlessly fascinating film.

 

I would love to see Eloy De La Iglesia's version.

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Did you ever read his book on his life in Hollywood - "Coreyography"?

 

And will he ever reveal the name of the man who raped a very young Corey Haim.

 

I am sure that Hollywood insiders know this pathetic individual's name.

 

Supposedly, he still maintains an elevated status in Hollywood circles.

 

Natalie Wood was raped as a young woman by a top Hollywood star.

 

And her mother told her that she must never reveal the name of this man.

 

Or else her film career would probably be destroyed.

 

Corey Feldman might feel the same way about revealing the name of Corey Haim's rapist.

 

I recently saw Corey Haim in "Murphy's Romance".

 

And I just felt that it was a shame that such a lovely child could have been "tainted" in this way.

 

According to Corey Feldman, the amount of men in Hollywood who like young boys would actually surprise you.

This is a tragic story

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The producers realized that, despite the R-ratings, the main audience for the Friday the 13th films were young teenage boys. Not only that, but by the mid-80's, horror movies effects were at their peak, thanks to magazines like Fangoria, and many of the FX artists were treated like rock stars, with their names being mentioned as prominently in the advertising as the film's stars or director. It was common for young film wannabe's to dream of being the next Rick Baker or Tom Savini rather than an actor or other filmmaker.

 

So it seemed natural to have the hero who finally bests Jason be a young man (like the majority of the audience) and a gifted horror make up artist, too!

The behind the scenes extra about the making of the movie is more interesting than the movie itself

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This is a tragic story

When you see the older Corey Haim - he looked so, so bad - your heart actually breaks.

 

He was selling parts of himself on ebay.

 

Where was his mother?

 

Was she ever vigilant enough?

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"These Three" is not a horror film, but Bonita Granville as Mary Tilford is one scary little girl - Miss Granville received an Academy Award nomination for this awesome performance -

 

81afe0da2897af385b1e1f1d3d94c747.jpg

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"These Three" is not a horror film, but Bonita Granville as Mary Tilford is one scary little girl - Miss Granville received an Academy Award nomination for this awesome performance -

 

81afe0da2897af385b1e1f1d3d94c747.jpg

It's an adaptation of The Children's Hour by Lillian Hellman, isn't it?

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When you see the older Corey Haim - he looked so, so bad - your heart actually breaks.

 

He was selling parts of himself on ebay.

 

Where was his mother?

 

Was she ever vigilant enough?

A lot of these child actors are exploited by their family too

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It's an adaptation of The Children's Hour by Lillian Hellman, isn't it?

You got it, but re-imagined for a straight audience.

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A lot of these child actors are exploited by their family too

Right, reading about what Natalie Wood's mother did to her is almost a horror story in itself.

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