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Most ROMANTIC Stars


MissGoddess
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Which stars in your opinion most represented what romance or romantic means to you?

 

For me they are:

Male: Gary Cooper, Ronald Colman, Errol Flynn. Why? Because each showed courage and grace under pressure in very different ways, and had a timeless quality to their heroes, which is probably why they so perfectly portrayed characters of ancient eras.

 

Female: Vivien Leigh, and to a lesser extent, Garbo, Gene Tierney and Grace Kelly. Vivien's own life was a pageant of romantic triumphs and tribulations to rival anything she did on screen. Garbo inhabited the guise of "tragic heroines" in a way that transcends time (or language---thru her silents) and the other two ladies represent for me a 20th century romanticism.

 

Miss G

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Hey, I like this thread!

 

I'll use it as a venue to talk about Cary Grant, and why I think he was one of the most ROMANTIC stars. He always had a confidence about him, but never did he (to me) come off egotistical. Not only was he very attractive looking, but his attitude was very charismatic.

 

I saw Notorious for the first time the other night and if you don't think Grant is romantic, just watch that flick! I also love the way he laughed at himself and his own jokes early on in his career. Sometimes when people do this it comes off as arrogant, but with Cary it comes off as charm. Maybe that doesn't make any sense... lol But I'm happy, and that's all that matters! ;)

 

Oh, Cary... If only we could bring you back to life and insert you into some of the flicks today, they might actually be worth watching.

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Very well expressed. I love learning what others consider "romantic". It's very subjective!

 

I think NOTORIOUS is probably Cary's most romantic film. He is more serious and sardonic, and that's when I find him his most attractive. What do you think is the most romantic scene in this---or any of Cary's movies?

 

I just feel I was born too late. I would have lived in the movie theaters back in the 30s, 40s and 50s, just to see men like him romancing the screen.

 

;)

 

Notorious_-_ingrid_bergman_and_cary_grant.gif

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This is an interesting question. I don't find any particular actor "romantic". I tend to look at the film and if there is a romantic scene in it, than I would consider that actor romantic in that scene. For instance, Burt Lancaster's kiss with Deborah Kerr in "From Here to Eternity" was romantic - but I don't necessarily consider Burt Lancaster to be romantic. Similarly, Marlon Brando's kiss with Eva Marie Saint in "On The Waterfront" was romantic as was his sensual kiss with Kim Hunter in "A Streetcar Named Desire". I suppose I would say Brando is most "romantic". As for Cary Grant, I'm not really into watching his films, he was a nice looking man - but I didn't care for the English accent and never really took a shine to him.

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Thank you for your post!

 

Burt and Brano certainly could crank up the heat! I find them very sexy, but for myself, not strictly "romantic". I dont' know why there is that differentiation in my feelings, but I can't help it. That's what makes horse races...

 

Most sexily romantic Burt Lancaster movie scene to me is the one in Separate Tables with Rita Hayworth, when she's taunting him so...

 

For Brando, I found him most attractive in Sayonara and oddly, One Eyed Jacks.

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What do you think is the most romantic scene in this---or any of Cary's movies?

 

*loves question*

 

In Notorious, I think the scene where they kiss while Claude Rains is coming down the stairs is very romantic... But really, the most romantic scene to me was when he found out she was being poisoned. On his face was both a look of worry and of guilt, then goes up to save her, asking her if she was in any pain.

 

I liked in In Name Only, when he is sick in the motel and Lombard's character is caring for him. I've only seen it once, but the owner of the motel makes some suggestive remark to her because she is not Grant's wife. And Grant comes out from the other room, more concerned for her and her reputation than for himself.

 

Only Angels Have Wings has some great romantic scenes for Grant, particularly when she makes coffee for him in his room and takes a shower there. I seem to remember it was Jean Arthur in that movie... Also love it when he says he never gets burned in the same spot twice, but does just that with the coffee pot (and Jean ;) )

 

Ok... I'll end it here! In She Done Him Wrong, just the looks Cary Grant gives -- Like when he is watching her on stage.

 

*swoons*

 

lol... Got more than you asked for.

 

bhf1940 :)

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I think of romantic characters as the ones that give themselves up entirely to the ones they love and those that die like martyrs suffering silently without being corresponded. These have played characters along the lines to my perception of "romantic":

 

Rudolph Valentino, Gregory Peck, Van Johnson, Ramon Novarro, Debbie Reynolds, Katharine Hepburn, and Deborah Kerr.

 

I always envision them with faces of anguish in those suffering roles.

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Could it be Grant wooing Grace Kelly in "To Catch A Thief"? Could it be Grant trying to wiggle his way into Irene Dunne's room at the end of "The Awful Truth"? Could it be Grant showing his frustration at trying to get Ann Sheridan anywhere in "I Was A Male War Bride"?

 

As for the women I'll take Claudette Colbert and Ginger Rogers (and there's plenty more where they came from.)

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Yes MissGoddess I do agree. I forgot Lancaster and Hayworth in Separate Tables.

 

Brando was attractive in Sayonara and One-Eyed Jacks. He was attractive in the Fugitive Kind as well with Ana Magnani. He sort of has this macho thing going on along with a tender, vulnerable side that just makes you want to take him home with you.

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I totally agree with your choices! They would probably be mine. In fact, I am reminded by them of the final scene in AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER, when he realises the truth about Deborah Kerr.

 

And I would also like to add, for its cheeky humor, the scene in Grace Kelly's hotel room in TO CATCH A THIEF. The fireworks say it all....lol!

 

Oh, and when Cary walks Irene Dunne home in the beginning of PENNY SERENADE, and he tells her he doesn't own a Victrola (after buying a stack of records from her)...when he looks up at her with that impish expression, I do find him irrisistible. ;)

 

One could go on and on. :)

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> I think of romantic characters as the ones that give

> themselves up entirely to the ones they love and

> those that die like martyrs suffering silently

> without being corresponded. These have played

> characters along the lines to my perception of

> "romantic":

>

> Rudolph Valentino, Gregory Peck, Van Johnson, Ramon

> Novarro, Debbie Reynolds, Katharine Hepburn, and

> Deborah Kerr.

>

> I always envision them with faces of anguish in those

> suffering roles.

 

There is another thread going about MY COUSIN RACHEL, which fits very neatly into this style.

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> I always envision them with faces of anguish in those

> suffering roles.

 

Yes, like the expression on Van's face in In the Good Old Summertime when, near the end, Judy quits her job so she can get away from him. He kills me when he walks around watching her singing...

 

And I have to add Gene Kelly to my list... Sheesh.

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When you see Marlon Brando in the snakeskin jacket in the Fugitive Kind, you will surely put this on your list of most handsome/romantic. Why doesn't TCM show this film? It's actually not a bad movie.

 

Have you ever seen Night of the Following Day? It was a film from the 1960's that I saw quite a while ago. It's hardly ever shown, but it is on DVD. Not a great film, but Brando was wearing skin tight black leather pants and sweater. He looked great and sadly I think this was the last film that his physique looked so great.

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No, I don't think I've seen Night of the Following Day---the title sounds familiar, though.

 

I do think Brando was handsome---it's just that there was too much going on with most of his characters, they were too conflicted, which turns me off. I like clear-headedness, a man who knows who he is and what he wants; that's romantic to me. Brando's characters were usually just too much like foolish, disappointing reality. ;)

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For me, the most romantic star is Rudolph Valentino.

 

No one else, male or female, even comes close. *lol* Shoot - I'd let him drag me off to his tent ANY time! *lol* Pretty much every film he did after The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse is hot and steamy - a quality I have no problem with whatsoever. *lol*

 

But just for the sake of discussion, here is the rest of my short-list:

 

Charles Boyer - I'm surprised no one has mentioned him in this thread by now as many of his films were REALLY romantic! Lots of romantic tear-jerkers in his filmography...and all of them good. When I want a romantic talkie...this is the actor whose films I go to first. Absolutely. Love Affair, All This and Heaven Too, Hold Back the Dawn, History is Made at Night, Conquest, Algiers... The list goes on and on. AMAZING romance movies.

 

Gary Cooper - not all of his roles are romantic leads...but the ones that are? WOW!!! I can work up a tear or two just *thinking* about Peter Ibbetson!

 

Errol Flynn - especially in his films with Olivia deHavilland. BEST. CHEMISTRY. EVER.

 

And so I guess my favorite romantic leading lady would be Olivia deHavilland - she was just so adorable in those Flynn films!!! And very good with Charles Boyer in Hold Back the Dawn...and with Monty in The Heiress (before his character screwed hers over, anyway! Then? Not so romantic! *lol* ) .

 

I'm trying to think of other romantic films I just loved, and their female stars...but even though I loved them in the particular roles, I wouldn't consider them romantic stars - they were just doggone good actresses in pretty much ANYTHING they did.

 

For example, I love Barbara Stanwyck in Ball of Fire and Meet John Doe...but I don't really consider her a 'romantic' actress. She was a great actress at pretty much anything she sent her hand to! But most of her roles were really not romantic roles...so I can't really classify her as a romantic actress.

 

Bette Davis is great with Charles Boyer in All This and Heaven Too (whoa BABY!!) and is very good with Errol Flynn in The Sisters....but I'd hardly call her a 'romantic' actress either. She was great at everything.

 

And Jean Arthur was great with Gary Cooper in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town...and great with Charles Boyer in History is Made At Night. Maybe *she* could be more classified as a romantic actress - so maybe I'll put her in with Olivia. :) She was in alot of romantic comedies, so I can live with that classification in her case.

 

And then, you have Charles Boyer's Mother of All Romance Films, Love Affair. That was Irene Dunne....and that film makes Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr look like pure amatures in the romance department. Good LORD, that film is romantic!!!

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