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Are there any Anton Walbrook fans here?


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I'm new to this site and am totally impressed with it! Thanks TCM! Anton Walbrook has been a favorite of mine for years (he hooked me in "Dangerous Moonlight", certainly not his best movie, but WOW...), and I'm wondering if anyone else here is familiar with him and the movies he made, and can possibly be as dedicated to his work as I am?

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Hi Minatonga! Thanks for your reply. Unfortunately, I missed Walbrook's "Gaslight" the other night, but I did a search at this site and found out that TCM will show again in October 2003. I won't miss it again because I've also requested a "reminder", even though it will once again be one of those "middle-of-the-night" movies.

 

If you've not seen "Dangerous Moonlight", it will show on TCM on Wednesday, July 30, and at a decent time in the evening. This is the Walbrook movie that introduced Richard Addinsell's "Warsaw Concerto" in the soundtrack, and is what still attracts most people to it.

 

I'm still hoping to see "The Red Shoes" on TCM, another classic film that drew big praise for Walbrook's performance. I'm amazed that it's not listed in TCM's film library!

 

Walbrook was bi-lingual, and also made several good movies in French or German. "La Ronde" is in French (with subtitles in English), and is another great classic worth checking out at a video store, along with "The Red Shoes" sometime. Thanks again for your reply!

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  • 1 year later...

ML, I just saw "The 49th Parallel" thanks to TCM premiering it last week (it was the first movie I watched when I returned from my vacation). Unfortunately, my TIVO failed to get the last 3-5 minutes of it, but I think I can figure out what Raymond Massey's character did to the Nazi Lieutenant;- ) Drop me an e-mail if you remember it, thanks!

 

In any case, Olivier should have had all copies of this film destroyed given the awful accent he exhibited in his brief appearance. It conjures up Streep's several poor attempts ("Out of Africa", "A Cry in the Dark") as well as Welles in "The Lady from Shanghai". However, the film itself was quite engaging. I particularly liked Walbrook's speech and Leslie Howard's surprisingly strong, even virile intellectual. Didn't Glynis Johns sound like Carol Channing?

 

Did anyone else watch this one?

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path, I know this isn't the place....movie favorites and all that stuff, but then again, this isn't Television Without Pity...but I noticed you don't have Death Takes A Holiday on your website recommendations.

 

I was doing my juggling act this morning...your list to TCM's list to my list to my calendar to my VCR, whew!...and I see that DTAH is on in March.

 

I don't believe this movie is shown that often and quite frankly, and ESPecially if you love Fredric March to pieces, which I do, this movie is an absolute, positive MUST SEE.

 

RUN, don't walk, and be sure to tape or see Death Takes A Holiday.

 

Sorry to interrupt your thread!!! Hope you don't mind.:)

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Hi Path! I've been very busy all weekend and haven't been here since Friday, thus I just saw this post. Sorry for the delay in replying.

 

I'm glad that you found the same merit's in "49th. Parallel" that I found. Sorry you missed the ending. I'll be in touch with you about it as soon as I have a few minutes. ;)ML

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That's O.K. ML, thanks! BTW, another thing about this film which was odd (when you stop and think about it) was the fact that everyone spoke the same language. I know there are a LOT of movies like this, especially during the 40's, but I still find it odd when persons with 3 or more native languages speak fluently to one another in English;- )

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Hey there, Path! It's very early in the day and I'm still working on my first cup of Java, so it's probably me just being a bit "slow". Anyway, I'm not sure where you are taking me with your comment re. bi-lingual actors, and why you found it "odd" in this movie. Can you be a darling and "clarify" for me? ;)ML

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Yes ML. What I meant to say was that, in this movie for example, 6 German U-boat Nazis go ashore in Eastern Canada and have no trouble speaking the same language as the French Canadians. Then, they travel inland and likewise are able to communicate with others, presumably English speaking persons. In other words, the Germans can speak their native language, and French, and English fluently. I'm not saying that they couldn't, I'm just saying that it's one of those things we've become accustomed to in older (less authentic?) films such that we may not even notice that we're having to suspend belief? Taking nothing away from these films, of course.

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Ok, Path...now I'm on the same page with you. Thanks for the clarification. You said it so well..."we may not even notice that we're having to suspend belief" while watching a well-acted and fast-paced movie like this one, but when we do finally step back and reflect on these obvious kinds of "oddities" in films, they do tend to stand out. It's extremely unrealisic to think that any of these Nazis would have been able to speak any language other than German as they traveled across Canada. But, that was something I didn't even think of myself while watching this film, there being so many other things holding my interest. ;)ML

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I also agree that Anton Walbrook is a fascinating actor and rare bird--though I kind of liked him in "The 49th Parallel". I've always wanted to see "Lola Montes" but I am very fond of memories of "Dangerous Moonlight" &, of course, "The Red Shoes".

 

Regarding whether of not Nazis could speak English or travel around quite as easily as depicted in The 49th Parallel, well, you might file this under "truth is stranger than fiction."

 

There were actually some forays onto American soil, (don't know about Canadian), during WWII by Nazis. One of the most memorable was the group who were dropped off on a Long Island, NY beach with explosives and a mission to cause as much sabotage as possible in America. They were composed of individuals who spoke English well and most had visited the US prior to this event. Additionally, since the largest number of immigrants to the US prior to WWII had come from Germany, it wasn't at all unusual to hear German-accented English spoken here and there were many Germantowns within American cities where these men could blend in at that time.

 

There were, however, a few flaws in the Nazi plan--instead of following the master plan that they'd been given, a couple of the men tried to contact family, friends and old girlfriends upon their arrival and one guy thought he'd become an American hero by turning his compatriots into the FBI. To make a long story short, they were captured while seated in a Dinty Moore restaurant in NYC, tried, (largely in secret), and executed by the government--even the poor schmoo who thought he'd get a hardy handshake from J. Edgar.

 

If you'd like to read some basic facts about this incident, you may want to check out the website at www.montauklife.com/history/history_night.

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Yup, Moira....your post here is exactly what I've missed about not having you here! Thanks for the additional information you provided.

 

It was because of seeing "Dangerous Moonlight" that my fascination with him got started. And, I saw that movie on AMC years ago, and only recently (last year) on TCM, and discovered that the TCM version has all of the footage in it that AMC edited out so that it would run in their "alloted time". So, you might want to watch this one again on TCM if you haven't already. And, if you ever get the chance, watch "La Ronde", too. I think you'll enjoy it.

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