Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Will "Ace in the Hole" be letterboxed tonight?


genius

Recommended Posts

Let's review movie basics 101:

 

Cinemascope and other widescreen processes weren't widely adopted until 1953. Practically every major movie made before 1953 was filmed in classic Academy ratio, which is roughly the same as a regular television.

 

Two exceptions:

The Big Trail (1930) - first film to be filmed in 70mm, then called "Grandeur"

Napoleon (1927) - filmed in part-widescreen triptych

Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct, The Robe was the first Cinemascope feature that really got it going. (I should have said "two years" instead of "three" because for some reason I was thinking The Robe was 1954.)

 

When I posted about widescreen starting in the Fifties, I knew about The Big Trail and Napoleon, but thought I would leave them off since they were exceptions and not the start of regular widescreen features. But, lol, I also figured someone else would fill in that info for me about those two films. Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it's hard to believe that widescreen movies could have started since the 30's but they didn't really become commonplace until the studios felt threatened by television.

 

Oh and the Fox Movie Channel is showing the letterboxed version of The Big Trail next month (the widescreen version is oddly not available on home video).

Link to post
Share on other sites

> I saw one of the special showings of the restored

> Napoleon a few decades ago with the live orchestra,

> and it was an amazing experience. Would like to be

> able to see it that way again.

 

I wish they'd at least show it in theaters more often, even without a live orchestra.

 

I think the only silent I've ever seen with a live orchestra was Sunrise, it was a beautiful experience. For some reason I've never been able to watch a color-tinted version of it again, tho.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> I saw one of the special showings of the restored

> Napoleon a few decades ago with the live orchestra,

> and it was an amazing experience. Would like to be

> able to see it that way again.

 

Keep an eye on the tour schedule of the Alloy Orchestra (www.alloyorchestra.com) to see if they're coming to your area. In October, I saw them accompany the original (1925) Phantom of the Opera at the IndieMemphis film festival; it was fantastic, beyond anything I'd expected.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vallo:

 

I saw 'Ace in the Hole', probably 45 to 50 years ago, I know I was just a kid but I have the memory of excitement, crying wives, and of course Kirk Douglas emoting. I just watched 'The Detective Story' but I have to skip 'Lonely are the Brave' because I can only take a short span of time on Douglas (two hours is about enough without a break). I swear William Shatner modeled his acting methods on Kirk Douglas, I can't decide which one overacts more. Since I can sleep in late in the a.m., I plan to stay awake and see 'Ace. . .' I should be revived by then.

 

I think the only movie I've seen him in where he wasn't 'playing to the back rows' was 'The Big Sky'. Normally I ignore his movies because he's such a ham but occasionally he'll be in one with someone I like, like the comedy he made with Susan Hayward, or 'The Longest Day', or 'In Harm's Way', wherein he stars, but is not THE star. Also, sometimes he goes totally off keel like in 'Lust for Life' or 'Two Weeks in Another Town'. Honestly, there have been times when I thought, "Geez, this guy should be locked up!" I was always surprised he wasn't cast as 'Elmer Gantry', that one was right up his alley.

 

So actually, I don't really care for Kirk Douglas, but I have to give him credit for the movies he's made when he acted normal, like 'Strangers When We Meet'. I am looking forward to 'Ace . . . ' tonight, maybe I'll find something in him I've missed til now.

 

Anne

Link to post
Share on other sites

And as I've said elsewhere, it has everything to do with hose, and nothing to do with its modern homophone, "hos" (though Jan Sterling's character qualifies as one of those, too).

 

And, as for Kirk Douglas, my classmate (yes, we actually went to school together, despite his being nearly forty years older than I), he's one this country's finest, and most intelligent actors. The thing is that movies back in his heyday were big -- even the small ones, whereas nowadays they're all small -- even the "big" ones. All the great stars of Hollywood's Golden Era were "big," and the Method stars who replaced them, with their bland what's-my-motivation mumblings, have helped make 21st Century moviegoing the overpriced chore that it is.

Link to post
Share on other sites

While were on the subject of letterboxing in tonight's films, I was a little disappointed to see that "The Heroes of Telemark" was not letterboxed. Both "Now Playing" and my on-screen satellite guide said it would be shown in widescreen. I don't know if TCM ever indicated on the website that it would be letterboxed, but the latest schedule I pulled up here did not have a letterbox symbol on it. I already had a full-screen tape of it from an Encore Action showing and was hoping to get the film letterboxed tonight.

 

I know TCM does its best to get a letterboxed version of films shot in a widescreen process and that it's not always possible to obain one (e.g., "Quiller"). Here's hoping, as with many other films previously aired full-screen, that TCM will run this one letterboxed next time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear what you're saying CineSage, jr but of all the Golden Age, or post WWII actors , Kirk Douglas makes emotions like anger, worry and indignation as palpable as an onrushing freight train, on a downhill run.

 

I knew I'd step on a few toes with my statements, but golly CineSage jr., I didn't expect to upset anyone so much that they would forget to use a whole preposition! :x

 

See ya in the funny papers!!!

 

Anne

Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Douglas' acting method

 

I found him to be a pretty good actor based on the movies I watched last night. He did seem to over act just a tad in DETECTIVE STORY but the character was so wound tight that I almost have to give him a pass for that. The other movies he seemed to act pretty normal in my eyes. Now, granted before last night's showings I wasn't exactly a fan of Douglas as the networks in Canada have shown some of the more blah or over exposed films such as SPARTACUS.

 

At least Douglas doesn't chew the scenery like Al Pacino does these days.

 

 

As for LONELY ARE THE BRAVE you sure missed out on a great flick. Douglas was positively understated in it and I loved the theme of individualism. I'll wait a couple days to type out my symbolic obsvervations of the film so that most people here can have a chance to watch it if they DVR the film.

 

ACE IN THE HOLE was an excellent portrayal of media cynicism at its best (worst?) and it kept me entertained. I couldn't bother to watch the last movie tho as it seemed slightly mediocre. I think it's because I wasn't in the mood to hear some german woman narrating the film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew I'd step on a few toes with my statements, but golly CineSage jr., I didn't expect to upset anyone so much that they would forget to use a whole preposition!

 

Are you referring to my statement "yes, we actually went to school together, despite his being nearly forty years older than I," mrsl?

 

Strictly speaking, the preposition "am" that might've concluded the sentence is superfluous, though its use isn't incorrect in modern colloquial English.

 

Getting back to the matter of the utterly brilliant ACE IN THE HOLE (no other actor of Douglas's generation could've, or should've played Chuck Tatum), the image in last night's telecast was fine (though it could've been a tad sharper), but the audio was thin and dreadful. I only hope that Paramount's forthcoming DVD will address this shortcoming.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope, next line:

 

"he's one this country's finest"

 

The preposition 'of' which is missing between 'one' and 'this'.

 

Come on CineSage, admit it, it's fun to kid a kidder!!! :x

 

In the immortal words of Osgood Fielding III (Joe E. Brown) - "Nobody's perfect!"

 

Anne

 

Message was edited by:

mrsl

Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally solved a mystery tonight that I had beed wondering about for years. A very good old actor played the Gowrie father in "Intruder in the Dust". He was the mean old **** man, and in the film he really looked like a many old **** man.

 

I didn't recognize him but he seemed like an accomplished actor. In the film he has only one arm. I don't know if they hid his missing arm or if he really did lose it in an operation.

 

Anyway, there were several Gowries listed in the film, and I didn't recognize the names of any of the actors who played them.

 

Tonight I saw the actor who played the newspaper publisher, Jacob Boot, in "The Big Carnival." In this film the actor put on a hat in a certain way, and then I recognized him as the guy who played the father, Nub Gowrie, in "Intruder in the Dust."

 

This actor, Porter Hall, played the guilty man in "the Thin Man". He was in many mystery films in the 1930s. He was Bette Davis' father in "The Petrified Forest." This guy was really a great actor.

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0356004/

Link to post
Share on other sites

"I'm a Medford Man. Medford Oregon."

 

-- Jackson (Hall) in DOUBLE INDEMNITY

 

And Hall was the sour studio executive, Mr. Hadrian, in Preston Sturges's incomparable SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS, and Jack McCall, the weasely assassin of Wild Bill Hickok in DeMille's THE PLAINSMAN.

 

Yes, he was a splendid, versatile actor.

 

It's interesting that Hall's character, Mr Boot, performs the same basic function in Wilder's ACE IN THE HOLE -- the basically incorruptible moral yardstick against which all other characters are measured -- as Edward G. Robinson's Barton Keyes does in the director's DOUBLE INDEMNITY. Wilder and his co-writers (and James M. Cain) realized that a reader's or viewer's notions of morality are too subjective and fluid for them to perform this function themselves; consequently, characters such as Keyes and Boot are necessary to lay down the ethical framework, and draw moral lines in the sand, that men like Walter Neff and Chuck Tatum then cross on their inevitable path to oblivion.

 

 

Nope, next line:

 

"he's one this country's finest"

 

The preposition 'of' which is missing between 'one' and 'this'.

 

Come on CineSage, admit it, it's fun to kid a kidder!!!

 

In the immortal words of Osgood Fielding III (Joe E. Brown) - "Nobody's perfect!"

 

Anne

 

Okay, ya got me. I confess to hoarding my "ofs."

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK I waited a bit, hopefully people will read this. Maybe I should make a new thread for it but eh

 

MY SYMBOLIC OBSERVATIONS OF LONELY ARE THE BRAVE

 

We all know the film has the focus of individualism but let's look at it this way. Douglas' character is physical expression of all of us. Sure, we may not want to be cowboys and such but he's so individual and carefree that he breaks out of the mold of society. That's something we all want to do except we're restricted by the norms and morals of society to act in a certain way.

 

So here he is, he only wants to be free to roam. Except, society is trying to suck him in and make him boring and more like us. That's the whole point to the long winded chas scenes. it's the physical manifestation of our desire to be ourselves and to be free of the stifling quality that society often brings.

 

In the end tho, it isn't meant to be. Modern society can't handle someone free and pure. In the end he had to pay the price but ironically his death didn't come from the strictures of authority and society but rather from the evils of technology itself which has made our lives increasinly creatively sterile.

 

 

What you think? Maybe I overthought the film a bit there?

Link to post
Share on other sites

> "I'm a Medford Man. Medford Oregon."

>

> -- Jackson (Hall) in DOUBLE INDEMNITY

>

> And Hall was the sour studio executive, Mr. Hadrian,

> in Preston Sturges's incomparable SULLIVAN'S

> TRAVELS, and Jack McCall, the weasely assassin of

> Wild Bill Hickok in DeMille's THE PLAINSMAN.

>

> Yes, he was a splendid, versatile actor.

>

> It's interesting that Hall's character, Mr Boot,

> performs the same basic function in Wilder's ACE

> IN THE HOLE -- the basically incorruptible moral

> yardstick against which all other characters are

> measured -- as Edward G. Robinson's Barton Keyes does

> in the director's DOUBLE INDEMNITY. Wilder

> and his co-writers (and James M. Cain) realized that

> a reader's or viewer's notions of morality are too

> subjective and fluid for them to perform this

> function themselves; consequently, characters such as

> Keyes and Boot are necessary to lay down the ethical

> framework, and draw moral lines in the sand, that men

> like Walter Neff and Chuck Tatum then cross on their

> inevitable path to oblivion.

 

Good point. This is one of the reasons for the Hays Code. Many films in the late '20s and early '30s had no moral yardstick and as a result the themes were drifting toward murder, corruption, and prostitution, with no punishment for the guilty. The same thing has happened in many modern movies.

 

I saw a recent BBC television production of "Rebecca" in which Mr. DeWinter admits to the new Mrs. DeWinter that he murdered his first wife because she was no danged good. So Mr. and Mrs. DeWinter successfully go through the rest of the film covering up his murder, and they get away with it. Not a good thing to teach kids and teenagers in the TV audience.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...