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February schedule is up


LawrenceA
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Wow! That was fast.  Unlike others, I haven't seen every Oscar nominated film, so for me, February is just like any other month.

 

It looks like it's an alphabetical theme this year (next year?)... 

 

I think I may very well have many of these already on the DVR.  But we'll see.

 

2/1 

 

Agatha.  It'd be curious to know what Agatha Christie was doing during those eleven days she was "missing" in 1926. 

 

2/3

 

Blues in the Night.  This looks like an interesting film starring Priscilla Lane and Betty Field.

 

Boomerang.  I can't remember if this film was airing in January during the Dana Andrews tribute, but either way, I'm interested in this noir.

 

2/13

 

Kind Lady.  This noir starring Ethel Barrymore and Angela Lansbury.

 

2/14

 

Lady Be Good.  An Eleanor Powell film I haven't seen

 

2/16

 

Madame Curie.  This looks like an interesting Greer Garson film I haven't seen.

 

A Majority of One.  A Rosalind Russell film I haven't seen.

 

2/17

 

Monsieur Verdoux. A Chaplin film I haven't seen.  

 

2/18

 

Mourning Becomes Electra.  Another Rosalind Russell film I haven't seen. 

 

The Music Box.  I just watched this last month.  But I don't care.  I love this Laurel & Hardy film.

 

2/23

 

Second Chorus.  A Fred Astaire film I haven't seen.

 

2/28

 

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.  This looks like a good movie and I'd love to read the book.  Maybe I can read it before it airs on TCM!

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Monsieur Verdoux. A Chaplin film I haven't seen.  

 

 

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.  This looks like a good movie and I'd love to read the book.  Maybe I can read it before it airs on TCM!

 

A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN  is  one of my very favorite films.. It astounds me that such a powererful movie was director Elia Kazan's first directorial effort.

 

The book is wonderful too, but I think in this case it would be better to see the movie first. There were cuts made to the book for the screenplay. Obviously because of it's length but also because of the movie censorship in those days.

 

If you  read the book first, you may be disappointed in the changes, but reading it  afterwards will bring more to the story rather than take away from it. At least that's how it worked for me.

 

As for MONSIEUR VERDOUIX, be prepared for Chaplin like you've never seen him before.

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Like the A--Z format; Notable films I've missed:

 

Feb. 10th--"The Great Waltz" (1938)--Standard love triangle, but beautiful cinematography won an Oscar, and the scene where Strauss composes "Tales of the Vienna Woods" is unintentionally funny (it was excerpted in "That's Entertainment!" (1974)).

 

Feb. 11th--"The Green Goddess" (1930)--Early talkie sounds like it might be a fun watch.

 

Feb. 16th--"Madame X"--(1929)--Maltin says remakes are better--the Lana Turner (1966) remake is Better???.  This must be truly Awful--in which case, it's a must-see for me, LOL.

 

Feb. 18th--"The New Land" (1973)--Sequel to "The Emigrants" (1972), by Swedish director Jan Troell, starring Max von Sydow and Liv Ullmann--this deals with their life in 1860's Minnesota.  Worth staying up for/recording.  Was nominated for Best Foreign Film.

 

Feb. 20th--"Poltergeist" (1982)--I saw this when it was first released, and haven't seen it since--am ready to rewatch what I remember as an excellent film.

 

Feb. 22nd--"Rhapsody in Blue" (1945) & "Rich, Young, and Pretty"--two musicals I've missed; "The Road to Morocco" (1940)--love that series of films: and "The Ruling Class" (1972)--English royalty + Jack the Ripper + religion=sounds like a Strange film; "Sadie Thompson"--Gloria Swanson's take on "Rain".

 

Feb. 28th--"Trader Horn" (1931)--Early MGM classic filmed in Africa.

 

March 4th--"White Shadows in the South Seas" (1928)--First MGM talkie has gorgeous cinematography, melodramatic plot.  Documentary pioneer Robert Flaherty (1922's "Nanook of the North", etc) did some work on the film.  "Z" (1969)--political thriller I've missed somehow.

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As I stated over in Barton's Oscar thread in the TCM programs forum, this was probably one of the easiest schedules they ever did. With no major theme, all they had to do was take the titles (Barton calls them TCM's Greatest Hits) and sort them alphabetically and plug them into the grid.

 

As Lawrence's opening post implies, some people will be unenthusiastic, since it's mostly the usual suspects (those Greatest Hits from the Turner library).

 

They did manage to bring in some Paramount and Universal films, but these are the titles they always play from those studios.

 

There is only one Republic title on the schedule-- THE QUIET MAN, no surprise there (but they are using it to promote John Ford's Oscar win, not to highlight Republic's achievements). Republic had dozens of Oscar-nominated films.

 

A few years ago, TCM's Oscar schedule was sorted by studios, and Republic was not represented at all. Republic's films are currently controlled by Paramount. So if TCM can make a deal to get THE HEIRESS, ROMAN HOLIDAY and THE QUIET MAN from Paramount-- surely they can try to get a few more Republic titles in the bargain to correct this on-going oversight.

 

On another note, DREAMGIRLS is the only film from recent years to make the schedule. Usually a lot of films from the 1990s and 2000s are featured. Not this time around.

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I found a couple of TCM rarities in the first week. By the time February rolls around, it will have been nine years since the last time Blazing Saddles aired on TCM, and if it sticks this time, Deliverance will be airing on TCM for the first time in 13 years! Deliverance was supposed to air this year, but it got pulled.

 

For me personally, there are only four movies airing the entire first week that I haven't seen before. Only one of them is airing at a convenient time:

 

The Adventures of Mark Twain (WB, 1944) - Frederic March as the legendary author. I don't think I'd ever even heard of this one.

 

The Boy Friend (MGM, 1971) - A musical starring the model Twiggy and no one else in the cast I know. I had never heard of this movie before, either. Directed by Ken Russell, so it's probably "out there".

 

Coquette (UA, 1929) - In which Mary Pickford became the first Best Actress winner for a talkie. I've read some reviews that it's really creaky and overwrought, but I would like to watch it as a curiosity.

 

A Cry in the Dark (WB, 1988) - I only know this one for that one line about the dingoes and the baby. One of Meryl Streep's zillion Best Actress nominations. I like Sam Neil. Sounds like pretty grisly subject matter, but this one is airing in the coveted 8 pm ET slot, so I will probably watch it. Next to Dreamgirls, I think it's the most modern movie airing this year.

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There are quite a few more in the second week that I haven't seen. Hopefully I will catch at least a few of them:

 

For Me and My Gal (MGM, 1942) - Somehow I've never seen this first Judy Garland-Gene Kelly pairing and I think Kelly's first movie ever. I'm sure it's aired on TCM a thousand times. I recall Robert Osborne once saying MGM knew Kelly was a unique talent but didn't know best how to utilize him until they loaned him out to Columbia for Cover Girl and saw how great he was in that.

 

G Men (WB, 1935) - Cagney appears to be heading for a life in the Mob, but joins the Bureau instead when a friend is killed. I can't absolutely swear I've never seen this one, but the plot description doesn't stir anything in my memory banks. I love Cagney in the '30s, so I'm sure I"ll enjoy it.

 

The Gazebo (MGM, 1960) - The plot description sounds quite a bit darker than your typical 1960 MGM comedy. I'm intrigued. Glenn Ford and Debbie Reynolds.

 

The Gorgeous Hussy (MGM, 1936) - I would watch for the cast alone, even if I didn't know it was a (probably wildly inaccurate, knowing Hollywood) political drama about the private life of one of our presidents. A film like this makes me miss the studio days when you could see all these people in the same movie: Joan Crawford, Robert Taylor, Lionel Barrymore, Franchot Tone, Melvyn Douglas, James Stewart, Beulah Bondi, Louis Calhern, Gene Lockhart. I mean, come on!

 

The Great Santini (Orion, 1979) - In which Robert Duvall probably doesn't win any Father of the Year awards. I've always avoided this one. Looks unpleasant. But the acting is probably great. Maybe I will finally check it out.

 

The Green Goddess (WB, 1930) - I only know George Arliss for Disraeli, so I'm curious to see him play something else. I fear it won't have the most enlightened view of Indians.

 

Hail the Conquering Hero (Paramount, 1944) - One Preston Sturges film I've somehow missed, but with Sturges regulars like Eddie Bracken, William Demarest and Franklin Pangborn, I'm sure it's worth watching.

 

The Hasty Heart (WB, 1950) - I'm really not much for sad movies, and this one sounds sad. But I know Richard Todd got an Oscar nomination, so I'd like to see it for that.

 

Kind Lady (MGM, 1951) - I had never heard of this one, but Ethel Barrymore always seemed to be in strong-to-quite-strong movies.

 

Kisses for My President (WB, 1964) - Planning to watch this one tomorrow night, so it probably won't be on the list anymore by February.

 

Knights of the Round Table (MGM, 1953) - Costume dramas are usually not my thing. Not sure if I"ll check this one out or not.

 

La Ronde (foreign, 1950) - Doesn't look like a whole lot of foreign films on the docket this year. Anton Wolbrook, Simone Signoret. Constantly placing on various "Best of ..." lists. I will try to check it out.

 

Lady Be Good (MGM, 1941) - Another MGM one overloaded with recognizable faces. Eleanor Powell, Ann Sothern, Robert Young, Lionel Barrymore, Virginia O'Brien, Dan Dailey, Reginald Owen, Phil Silvers.

 

The Little Fugitive (indie, 1953) - Don't know much about this one, but I'm all for something a little off the beaten path during 31 Days.

 

 

 

 

 

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There are quite a few more in the second week that I haven't seen. Hopefully I will catch at least a few of them:

 

...

 

The Gazebo (MGM, 1960) - The plot description sounds quite a bit darker than your typical 1960 MGM comedy. I'm intrigued. Glenn Ford and Debbie Reynolds.

 

...

 

Starring Carl Reiner as "Harlow Edison"??  Hmm.  LOL  Sounds interesting to me too.  And it is labeled as a comedy.

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sewhite2000----

 

DO check out THE ADVENTURES OF MARK TWAIN  and THE GREAT SANTINI.

 

You won't be disappointed.  FREDERIC MARCH gives an outstanding performance( no surprise there) as Twain.

 

DUVALL gives one of his best turns in SANTINI, with strong support by BLYTHE DANNER and MICHAEL O'KEEFE

 

I haven't seen it in quite a while so I'm looking forward to it.

 

 

Sepiatone

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It's a black comedy. It is quite amusing especially when the title "character" (the gazebo) comes into play.

 

I find it a gentle little comedy. I feel it would have been easy for it to have become either stupidly silly or oppressively morbid but it stays the course for a strange little story as might be told by Thurber. 

 

Looking for the movie many years ago led me to this anecdote of a Gazebo influencing a D&D game:

http://www.comedycorner.org/90.html

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I know TCM uses some imaginative ways to tie the movies together in February Oscar month -- there's always a sub theme -- such as Oscar movies by year, or by studio, or last year's clever Kevin Bacon game inspired theme. But the 2017 February schedule makes little sense to me where they are just showing all the movies in alphabetical order. Unlike previous years, there won't be any real theme or common bond that ties one movie to the next. I can't imagine anybody tuning in on February 2 because they want to watch the Oscar movies that start with 'B'. I guess this brings a new definition to a B-movie.

 

Perhaps on the positive, I would think the schedule is pretty much set in stone. Any schedule changes would be pretty difficult to keep the alphabetic theme in tact.

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I can't say I'm ever wild about Oscar month, since most of the oscar nominated movies I want to watch I've already seen before.  But there are some movies interesting to see in the name of completedness.

 

2/1  The Adventures of Mark Twain:  I remember seeing the first few minutes of this back in 1981, and all I remember is an explanation of the name Mark Twain.  On the one hand, a life of Mark Twain sounds interesting.  On the other hand, the biopic is not a Hollywood genre I admire or care for.  And if I wanted to cast Mark Twain, I don't think I'd cast Frederic March, an actor I don't find particularly interesting.

 

2/2 Both nice to see Barry Lyndon and The Battle of Algiers.  Battleground, early on the 3rd, is a best picture winner I haven't seen.

 

2/4  I wouldn't mind seeing The Boy Friend again, but Saturday afternoon is not a good time for me.

 

2/6  Coquette is considered a bad Best actress winner, basically a sop for Mary Pickford.  But it would be nice for me to check that out for myself.

 

2/7  My top 10s for 1927, 1929, 1930, 1938, 1942 and 1943 are incomplete.  So Destination Tokyo might be worth a look.  So might Dreamgirls, Fame and Fanny.

 

2/8  Will TCM Canada finally get to see Foreign Correspondent?  Don't bet on it.

 

2/10  The Great Waltz probably won't fit my 1938 top 10, but why not watch it and see?

 

2/11 The Hasty Heart is one of the few oscar nominated movies to star Ronald Reagan.

 

2/13  I'll Cry Tomorrow is one of the more respected acting nominees that I haven't seen.  Kings Row is one of the other few oscar nominated movies to star Reagan.

 

2/14 Nice to have La Ronde in a weekday afternoon. 

 

2/15  Love me or Leave Me is one Cagney nominated performance I haven't seen.

 

2/16  Madame Curie is a "major" 1943 movie.  Merrily we Live is a "major" 1938 movie.  It's nice to know McCabe and Mrs. Miller is on. 

 

2/19  The Patent Leather Kid is a rare 1927 movie. 

 

2/23  The Sea Wolf is a movie I think of watching but never do. 

 

2/25  I've seen A Tale of Two Cities before, but I would like to see it again.

 

2/26  A Thousand Clowns is a best picture nominee I haven't seen.

 

2/28  Tristana is an interesting TCM foreign movie choice.

 

3/2  Weary River is a largely forgotten 1929 directorial nominee.

 

3/3  The Young Girls of Rochefort and Z are good foreign film choices to end Oscar month   The Young in Heart is another 1938 movie.

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I'm looking forward to The New Land and The Young Girls of Rochefort.

 

Some of you have mentioned not seeing The Hasty Heart. It's a must for Patricia Neal fans. She gives one of the best performances of the year, playing the nurse in charge of the servicemen recuperating after the war is over. Richard Todd is also excellent as the difficult Scotsman who causes so much trouble for his wardmates (or hutmates, perhaps). Vincent Sherman is a rather underrated director. Ronald Reagan doesn't let the side down, though Neal and Todd have the juicy roles.

 

A Cry in the Dark is not at all a comfortable movie, but very well made. Meryl Streep gives one of her best performances as a woman who's rather cold and not very likable, so that people want to believe she killed her daughter. After all, the alternative would be to accuse a dingo of killing the baby, and the PETA types aren't having any of that. Sam Neill, as Streep's thoroughly dominated husband, has a great scene where he breaks down from sheer exhaustion on the witness stand. Streep and Neill won the Australian equivalents of the Oscar, both much deserved.

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2/16

 

Madame Curie.  This looks like an interesting Greer Garson film I haven't seen.

 

And, of course, Garson's Oscar nomination for it became a typecasting joke for years--

 

Greer became so studio-associated with Oscar-winning drama/biopics that when Judy Garland in Ziegfeld Follies played an Oscar-winning actress singing about the inventor of the safety pin, the number had originally been created for Garson to parody her own Madame Curie image.

(But Greer had already had a singing role in Random Harvest, and turned it down.)

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when Judy Garland in Ziegfeld Follies played an Oscar-winning actress singing about the inventor of the safety pin,

Lana Turner reprised that number on The Ed Sullivan Show. Turner's version has showed up, without any opening or closing credits, as a TCM Extra/One Reel Wonder. (It's also on Youtube.)

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Days just fly by. Here are a list of the films from the third week of February's 31 Days I haven't seen and may attempt to:

 

Look for the Silver Lining (WB, 1949) and Love Me or Leave Me (MGM, 1955) - Two real-life female singer biopics I haven't seen up to now. Always kind of avoided the latter because I assume Cagney appears in a largely unsympathetic role, but he got an Oscar nom, I think? So, perhaps I should check it out.

 

Maame X (MGM, 1929) - Which got Lionel Barrymore an Oscar nomination for Best Director, of all things. Don't know his personal history enough to know why he pretty much only pursued acting from this point on in his career. Ruth Chatterton I only know from Dodsworth and Female, but she's a commanding presence in both, so I suspect this one is worth viewing.

 

Merrily We Live (MGM, 1938) - Plot description on IMDB sounds vaguely familiar to My Man Godfrey. I think Constance Bennett has been a previous SOTM? I seem to remember having enjoyed a run of her films at one time.

 

Min & Bill (MGM, 1930) - Wallace Beery and Marie Dressler suppposedly at their hammy best. Somehow one I've never seen.

 

The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima (WB, 1952) - Religious vision movies aren't really high on my list of must-watches, but if I have nothing better to do ...

 

Mister Roberts (WB, 1955) - One I've inexplicably missed despite many, many TCM airings.

 

Mon Oncle d'Amerique (Dist. in USA by New World, 1980) - One of the very few foreign language films airing this month. Gerard Deprardieu.

 

The New Land (Dist. in USA by WB, 1973) - Hey, another foreign language film! Max Von Sydow, Liv Ullman. I "watched" The Emigrants when it aired during a recent 31 Days (I think I fell asleep three times - just too glacier-paced for me). Not sure why TCM wouldn't ever air these back-to-back (okay, that wouldn't fit the alphabetical theme, but some other time of the year ...)

 

The Outlaw Josey Wales (WB, 1976) - Iconic Clint Eastwood Western that I've missed.

 

The Patent Leather Kid (WB, 1927) - The only silent film airing this year?

 

The Primrose Path (RKO, 1940) - Plot description says "the youngest child in a family of prostitutes tries to go straight"! A family of prostitutes? I feel pretty sure the Hayes Code kept the actual movie from being as scandalous as that plot description sounds.

 

Princess O'Rourke (WB, 1943) - This was probably on when Olivia de Havilland was SOTM, but I missed it.

 

The Private Lives of Elizabeth & Essex (WB, 1939) - I generally avoid movies set in medieval or Renaissance times, but this one has quite a cast.

 

The Red Danube (MGM, 1949) - I turned on the TV in the middle of this one a year or two back and had no idea what I was watching but stuck with it for 30 minutes or so because I recognized practically everyone in the cast. I'd like to see the whole thing. 

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And, of course, Garson's Oscar nomination for it became a typecasting joke for years--

 

Greer became so studio-associated with Oscar-winning drama/biopics that when Judy Garland in Ziegfeld Follies played an Oscar-winning actress singing about the inventor of the safety pin, the number had originally been created for Garson to parody her own Madame Curie image.

(But Greer had already had a singing role in Random Harvest, and turned it down.)

 

In the TV movie "Me and My Shadows" Judy (Judy Davis), when arguing with Vincente Minnelli (Hugh Laurie) about a studio suspension, yells "WHY CAN'T YOU MAKE THEM TREAT ME THE WAY THEY TREAT GREER GARSON!"  I suspect that Judy relished doing the Follies number.

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