Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
katyscar11ett

Queen Bee

Recommended Posts

What a great movie! I knew of it but had never seen it until today - I had really been looking forward to finally seeing it - I was not at all disappointed!

 

Anyone who's seen this movie knows what the B stands for. What an awful woman - and Joan played her to the finest degree - as always. It's these roles of Joan's that made me (as a child) despise her. When I became an adult, I realized what a wonderful actress she is - and that I hated her because I was supposed to hate her - those are the roles she plays, IMO, the very best. She's even a better b**ch than Bette Davis - although I do prefer Bette of the two. This is not a light hearted movie, but filled with intensity, bitterness and hatred - plus it is thought-provoking. I loved the ending because (I believe) it ended the way it should - but it still surprised me and came out of left field.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This may sound weird but I think this would be a great movie to get non-classic fans hooked on classics. This movie has all the characters, the witch (Joan and the nanny), the nice girl (Jennifer), the pitiful guy, (Avery), and the so-so- guy (John Ireland). the wrong ones get what's coming to them, and the 'nice' ones 'get away'. It has 'bite' and sweetness, and all the other emotional things that make up a good movie. A non-classic viewer just might enjoy hating Joan and seeing her get 'it' in the end. They may even realize it was all done with no foul language, and no blood and guts, and no creepy music, or monsters, or cats jumping through the window to scare the heck out of you.

 

GO BEARS !!!!

 

Anne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a hoot! La Crawford has a field day maneuvering all those around her in her Southern mansion, including Barry Sullivan and John Ireland. Good to see Fay Wray in a cameo appearance.

Crawford was a knockout in the fashions of the 1950s, and the finale was quite a surprise if not a shock. Good stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<<"This may sound weird but I think this would be a great movie to get non-classic fans hooked on classics.">>

 

No, this is actually true. I have shown QUEEN BEE to friends who dislike classic films, especially black and white films, and they loved it.

 

This isn't the case for many other classics, such as GWTW, or minor classics like Johnny Guitar. But show them QUEEN BEE and you made a fan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

This is the movie that introduced me to Joan Crawford literally and figuratively.

The picture was shown at one of Bill and Edie Goetz's parties after dinner and also present were Jean Louis and his wife, Maggie. Joan was making another movie for Bill Goetz at Columbia and Jean Louis was designing her costumes again.

This is where I saw my first Joan Crawford movie and actually met her. The diamond necklace she wears, that looks like a backwards C is actually hers. She wore it again at the Oscars in 1963.

 

Larry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi TLJC,

 

Yes, now-a-days one can reproduce anything. But, that necklace was the real thing and when it hit the lights onstage Oscar night, it blinded the audience. It was quite a sight to see and of course Crawford was the star to pull it off.

 

The year before (1962), she wore a diamond and emerald drop necklace and I asked her how much it cost. She said, "80". When my eyes bulged out and I said we should have a security guard with a gun handy, she casually said. "Don't worry, I have a gun in my bag!".... Then, she looked at me and laughed her Joan Crawford laugh. Ya gotta love a dame like that!!!!!

 

Larry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, you were so lucky to meet her. She was the greatest! I imagine she really did carry a gun in her purse, like Myra Hudson in SUDDEN FEAR. :)

 

<<"She said, "80". When my eyes bulged out and I said we should have a security guard with a gun handy, she casually said. "Don't worry, I have a gun in my bag!".... Then, she looked at me and laughed her Joan Crawford laugh. Ya gotta love a dame like that!!!!!">>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joan played this way over the top. Destroying a room with a Riding crop, and the scene with the cold cream on the mirror so she couldn't see herself. Great B movie with a great Actress. Good stuff...

 

 

vallo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I caught enough of this movie to appreciate the gorgeous Jean Louis gowns and the glorious house in which these unhappy people lived, but gave up once Betsy Palmer disappeared from the movie. There's a girl who may have been born too late to be a star. Too bad, since she was rather lovely and likable. Can't take too much of the latter day Joan when she attended the Grand Guignol school of acting, as in the other late career entry that TCM showed this past week, The Caretakers. I can acknowledge her good acting and hard work, but enjoyment doesn't enter into my appreciation. Btw, what was with her hair in that movie?

 

I like Miss Crawford in her early talkies, before she was permanently lacquered, as in Possessed (1931) and Grand Hotel (1932). Think she should've hung it up around 1948 shortly after Mildred Pierce, imho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

 

I read somewhere...Joan Crawford took on a warrior look in her late fifties and sixties films. Well, on my television...Joan looked ready for battle in "Queen Bee". Particularly, the way she had her eyes made up. I wouldn't go one on one with Crawford's Eva Phillips. Did anyone notice (am I just imagining the following)? I think Lucy Marlow's (Jennifer Stewart) eyes (eyebrows and eyelashes) took on the "look of Eva" towards the end of "Queen Bee". Scary.

 

The thing I really liked about this movie was the postscript dialogue. A simple declarative sentence was not good enough. Oh, no...no...no. For example:

 

"I am going downstairs to eat supper."

P.S. "I usually drink my dinner."

P.P.S. "I drink because my life is miserable."

 

"People are always telling me I drink too much."

P.S. "I drink to dull my pain."

P.P.S. "I'm always in pain because my life is miserable."

 

"Have a nice time on your date."

P.S. "From our first date, I knew I would marry my husband."

P.P.S. "I haven't slept in the same bed with my husband for five years."

 

And so on...

 

"Queen Bee" is a keeper.

 

Rusty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<<"Think she should've hung it up around 1948 shortly after Mildred Pierce, imho.">>

 

But then we would have missed her great, Oscar-nominated performance in the classic noir SUDDEN FEAR (1952), a film she was absolutely gorgeous and glamorous in. Check it out.

 

Not to mention FLAMINGO ROAD, probably Joan at her most relaxed and prettiest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> "I like Miss Crawford in her early talkies, before she was permanently lacquered, as in Possessed (1931) and Grand Hotel (1932). Think she should've hung it up around 1948 shortly after Mildred Pierce, imho."

 

But, Moira, if she had, I'd have spent my teenage years without experiencing "Berserk", and "Trog"; without those influences on my slowly maturing brain, I might have grown up, you know, "peculiar"!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bill,

 

Ya, the riding crop destroying the bedroom scene was a little too melodramatic for me, but the cold cream scene was well done, I thought. It showed her and us that she couldn't look at what she'd become. It brought some (but not much) sympathy to the character.

 

Crawford is the quintessential movie star/actress. She started out in 1925 with no training and learned and improved throughout several decades and an Oscar to grand dame of Hollywood. She made her last movie (allbeit a stinker) in 1970.

Has anybody else equalled that? I think not.

And today, even the young know who she is/was; even though it may be as 'Mommydearest'........

 

Larry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uh, sorry, guys, but I've seen alot of Joan Crawford's late career work, including Flamingo Road (good comedy!), and Sudden Fear, as well as fairly obscure stuff like The Story of Esther Costello, Autumn Leaves, the Night Gallery episode directed by Spielberg, Trog, and even an appearance on David Frost's old talk show ,(say, is that on dvd?--he interviewed--and sometimes fawned over and provoked--a fantastic range of people).

 

As I said previously, I can appreciate her hard work and good maintenance job of her equipment, but...no, it's no good for me, just kind of sad. If you guys like her, I wish you well and think you might be making ol' Joan pretty happy somewhere, maybe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> Crawford is the quintessential movie star/actress.

> She started out in 1925 with no training and learned

> and improved throughout several decades and an Oscar

> to grand dame of Hollywood. She made her last movie

> (allbeit a stinker) in 1970.

> as anybody else equalled that? I think not.

 

Equalled it in what sense? Just plain longevity? Mickey Rooney also got started in the 20's and is still in movies playing in theaters in 2007...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Cinemascope,

 

Yes, longevity but also improvements to her personal and professional stature.

She was a 'hoofer' in the chorus when discovered and gradually learned her acting chops and became a star and then endured and improved over those years. I don't think it came easily for her, but she persevered......

 

Mickey Rooney was naturally talented in dancing and timing and although he probably has had a longer career, I don't think he's had talent anxiety.......

 

Larry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think longevity as a "star." Bette Davis also had a long career, but she transitioned into supporting roles. Joan was always the star, with just a few exceptions (Best of Everything and The Caretakers come to mind).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am bringing this particular thread back up, the good, the bad and the ugly because:

 

1. it has lots of great info.

2. I spent lot of time searching for it manually because it would not

come up otherwise. I found it on page 124.

3. it is because of this thread that I actually took the time to watch

Queen Bee this time around.

 

Message was edited by: cinemafan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TCM: PLEASE BRING BACK PREVIEW!

because: 1. it has lots of good info.

2. it took me a while to find it manually, on page 124.

3. it was because of this thread that I took the time to watch

Queen Bee this time around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

because: it has lots of good info, it took me a long time to find it on page 124 and it is because of this thread that I made time to watch Queen Bee this time around. Please work this time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, but I was just flat out bored with Queen Bee. It hasnt aged well over time. Joan is stuck playing a character with unbelievable mood swings. (Nice this scene; Bitchy next scene) Very stagey and predictable script. Lucy Marlowe was terrible. And this from the guy who helped write Midred Pierce!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...