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GGGGerald

50's Lifestyle

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Nowadays, this has become a way of life. Or a way people (many young) wish to live. Some of it comes as a counter movement of feminism. But, much of it seems to come from people being introduced to classic films and television and believing people actually lived like this:

 

One income homes. Housewives spending all day keeping the home and raising the children, etc... And there are those who wish to "go back" to these days ... except that television and movies are entertainment, and those glorious days when a woman could wake up and her hair was already done, never existed. I know both my parents worked during those days.

 

Have any of you encountered this in today's life ? Positive or negative.

 

What films would you say display a life that you might want to live ?

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Nowadays, this has become a way of life. Or a way people (many young) wish to live. Some of it comes as a counter movement of feminism. But, much of it seems to come from people being introduced to classic films and television and believing people actually lived like this:

 

One income homes. Housewives spending all day keeping the home and raising the children, etc... And there are those who wish to "go back" to these days ... except that television and movies are entertainment, and those glorious days when a woman could wake up and her hair was already done, never existed. I know both my parents worked during those days.

 

 

Have any of you encountered this in today's life ? Positive or negative.

 

What films would you say display a life that you might want to live ?

 

 

Gerald-- the fashions, The Cars, TV shows were entertaining; the music was quite good. However it goes without saying that the societal situations of certain demographics such as black people, women, homosexuals, Latinos were segregated, marginalized and stereotyped.

 

 

Most women did not work who were middle class. Those in that class who did work were, for the most part-- teachers, nurses, librarians or social workers. In fact that was the entire a group of them because there were mostly women in these professions-- until they got to the managerial top and those were often men-- School principal or head librarian.

 

Women who were lower middle class and working class were just secretaries, department store sales clerks, hairdressers excetera. The very people who kept the downtown and offices working.

 

Gerald, it was a formal time, but at the same time there was a lot less formality in leisure pursuits and no need for extreme forms of security or worrying about your personal safety that much.

 

We went to the movies a number of Saturdays in the month and you always dressed up.

 

I would say from my personal experience that Leave It to Beaver was a bit of a formal type 1950s presentation. But an average 19 fifties or early sixties presentation would be My Three Sons or Andy Griffith.

 

 

BTW-- adult women didn't wear pants all that much and often did housework in what they called House Dresses.

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Interesting idea for a thread. Of course, the 50s lifestyle is not just represented in films of the era, but also in television shows (with the Nelsons, the Cleavers and others).

 

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One thing Iike about the '50's are the automobiles.  Teenagers and young men took wreaks and made cool hot rods out of them.

 

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This represent the 50's more than anything far as standard cars go.

 

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One thing I like about the '50's are the automobiles.  Teenagers and young men took wrecks and made cool hot rods out of them.

 

 

Ah, what we accomplished without video games, mobile devices, 1000 channel cable TV, and helicopter parents. Boredom sometimes breeds creativity and ingenuity. Either that or random petty crime.

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I'm curious to see the house behind the car in the first picture.

 

I'm reminded of the beach house in A Summer Place where Richard Egan and Dorothy McGuire go to live. There's some 50s style!

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I'm curious to see the house behind the car in the first picture.

 

I'm reminded of the beach house in A Summer Place where Richard Egan and Dorothy McGuire go to live. There's some 50s style!

 

Its also interesting how that Mid Century Modern style is still popular. Much of "modern" design is basically reworking this with newer materials. Its still the clean, geometric, solid color style that we see in newer upscale homes. 

 

One thing Iike about the '50's are the automobiles.  Teenagers and young men took wreaks and made cool hot rods out of them.

 

c-218.jpeg?w=700

 

2177836593c2983b91eaae170e1cd87b.jpg

 

 

This represent the 50's more than anything far as standard cars go.

 

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There is a park around the corner from me that on Sunday's , people bring their classic cars, some like these. You definitely see cars like this on the road on Sunday.

 

 

Gerald-- the fashions, The Cars, TV shows were entertaining; the music was quite good. However it goes without saying that the societal situations of certain demographics such as black people, women, homosexuals, Latinos were segregated, marginalized and stereotyped.

 

I think the idea is to bring back the positive aspects while fixing the negative. A society where everyone can participate would be ideal I think.

 

How often do you watch films for the styles as well as the plot ? I know I do quite often.

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I think the idea is to bring back the positive aspects while fixing the negative. A society where everyone can participate would be ideal I think.

 

How often do you watch films for the styles as well as the plot ? I know I do quite often.

 

LOL  I can't believe I am replying to this, but same here.  Gee, we must be the odd ones out.

 

For that matter I also love the early 60s.  The scenery in Bob Hope's Bachelor In Paradise comes to mind.  I "LURVE" the 50s/early 60s aesthetics. (hat-tip to Tikisoo).

 

 

This came out in 1959.

 

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How often do you watch films for the styles as well as the plot ? I know I do quite often.

What a coincidence that I came across this thread. Tonight I watched "Blondie Johnson", with Joan Blondell, and while I liked the story just fine, I got so caught up in the early 1930s stage sets that I'm now watching other films in the same time period just to see the decor. Would love to have such a vintage place.

 

All eras have their good and bad sides, and I can't say I've lived through so many decades, but sometimes when I watch these old films I wish real life was so sanitized and wrapped in the proverbial bow, lol...

 

(Being careful to clarify, though, I'm not saying that I think a woman's place is in the kitchen, or certain groups should be marginalized...)

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I always over analyze the details of a 1950s movie. Like Frank Sinatra's bachelor pad in The Tender Trap. I focus on his bar, the glasses, kitchen.....

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I love the styles of the past, especially the Deco and Moderne styles of the 20s and 30s, and Mid-Century Modern from the 50s and early 60s. Seeing these styles in films from this period is one of the attractions of classic films for me.

Not to politicize this, but a presidential candidate is wanting to take us back to the (idealized) 50s, with the slogan to Make America Great Again. White men would run everything again, women would not be in the workplace, minorities would be in "their place", and gays back in the closet. There would be no place in this scheme for a black or a woman president.

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I always over analyze the details of a 1950s movie. Like Frank Sinatra's bachelor pad in The Tender Trap. I focus on his bar, the glasses, kitchen.....

 

Me too.

 

 

The perfect 50's decor movie is Pillow Talk. The public and the critics really emphasized the obvious sexual content of the movie - - but when you look at it over and over again on DVD it's really about how decor precipitates sexual contact.

 

Doris Day is an interior decorator who gets all of these sexual come- ons from

her clients, and even one client's son.

 

She plays hard to get for a long time, but in the end it's her own "combative" interior decoration of Rock Hudson's apartment that consummates her relationship with him.

 

Frank Sinatra's apartment in The Tender Trap is a bright, realistic, to the point, functional bachelor pad-- it's not really that big.

 

But Rock Hudson's apartment in Pillow Talk is more of a caricature of the 50s bachelor pad - - an absolute spider's web of masculine entrapment.

 

Pillow Talk is the quintessential 50's romantic comedy. However, it's so well-written that,in general, I think today's audiences will find it entertaining and could even identify with the number of the characters.

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Me too.

 

 

The perfect 50's decor movie is Pillow Talk. The public and the critics really emphasized the obvious sexual content of the movie - - but when you look at it over and over again on DVD it's really about how decor precipitates sexual contact.

 

Doris Day is an interior decorator who gets all of these sexual come- ons from

her clients, and even one client's son.

 

She plays hard to get for a long time, but in the end it's her own "combative" interior decoration of Rock Hudson's apartment that consummates her relationship with him.

 

Frank Sinatra's apartment in The Tender Trap is a bright, realistic, to the point, functional bachelor pad-- it's not really that big.

 

But Rock Hudson's apartment in Pillow Talk is more of a caricature of the 50s bachelor pad - - an absolute spider's web of masculine entrapment.

I love this film and yet I never looked at it this way. Thanks for your insightful post!

 

On another note, two apartments I wish were "mine" are Katharine Hepburn's in Desk Set (there's lots of mismatched furniture but there's an overall warmth and 'elegance' that pulls it together for me), and Ray Milland's/Grace Kelly's in Dial M for Murder.

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I love the styles of the past, especially the Deco and Moderne styles of the 20s and 30s, and Mid-Century Modern from the 50s and early 60s. Seeing these styles in films from this period is one of the attractions of classic films for me.

 

Not to politicize this, but a presidential candidate is wanting to take us back to the (idealized) 50s, with the slogan to Make America Great Again. White men would run everything again, women would not be in the workplace, minorities would be in "their place", and gays back in the closet. There would be no place in this scheme for a black or a woman president.

 

Talking about Hollywood and reality in the 19 fifties and sixties.

 

Stanley Kramer made a number of movies that promoted black people as human beings, starring Sidney Poitier.

 

While, for the most part, most of the movies of course maintained the status quo as people knew it. Because that is generally what the audiences wanted.

 

But so many of the Hollywood stars were very much involved in the Civil Rights Movement. They closed the studios the day of the March on Washington with Martin Luther King's I Have a Dream speech.

 

You name-- it all the stars were there Paul Newman, Burt Lancaster, Tony Curtis and Charlton Heston organized it.

 

Hollywood people--this is true with artists in general-- aren't generally as Prejudiced or bigoted, or backward as the general public because they're artists. They're working all the time with gay people, foreign people, all kinds of people from different backgrounds to make art. And also many artists tend to be more open in terms of their own personal lives.

 

In the thirties and forties Hollywood may have been the only place in the US where gay people could actually have great professional careers and live openly gay in terms of the Hollywood Community.

 

Hollywood has always been a paradox like that.

 

We could do a thread on this. What I always found interesting was that most of the Hollywood Studios were run and owned by Jewish Executives. But they didn't depict Jewish people or Jewish subjects on the screen much or hire openly Jewish actors or actresses to be stars. Paul Muni may have been the exception to the rule.

 

Louis B Mayer at MGM made movies to please the mainstream of white Protestant movie-goers who wanted to see themselves depicted in their conception of the American dream along with their conception of how America should be. Indeed, the best way to make money is to please the audience.

 

That's Hollywood-- or I should say that showbiz!

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Bette Davis in June Bride. I love the lamps in her apartment that she turns on in that scene with Robert Montgomery. Seriously, I focus on the lamps....where are they now?

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Got the admit, the 1950's had one of our highest ranking / respected presidents.

 

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You give me a good opportunity to talk about respect for presidents and respect for the office.

 

There are a number of people in this country who have never given Barack Obama the respect he deserves for being President of the United States.

 

When I was growing up in the 1950s my parents taught me to respect the office of the presidency and to respect President Eisenhower.

 

When he had a heart attack my brother made a drawing of his school house and sent it to President Eisenhower to cheer him up because he was sick.

 

Mamie Eisenhower sent us back of card to thank us

 

I'm telling you all this because my parents did not vote for President Eisenhower. They didn't even like President Eisenhower, as a president.

 

They believed President Eisenhower played golf too much and left too many of the decisions to other people and didn't do enough of the work himself. My father felt that he played golf too much and didn't attend to the Oval Office enough. That he was just a front for the Republican Party.

 

At this point, you might guess that my parents were Democrats who voted for Adlai Stevenson twice.

 

However, as children we were taught to respect Ike and to listen to him when he was on television. That's why we cordially sent him a note to cheer him up when he was sick. ( I couldn't read or write cursive at the time, but I did print my name to it.)

 

That's a 1950s lesson about how to have respect for the presidency and a president, even if you disagree with the president's policies.

 

It's too bad Donald Trump never learned that from his father in the 1950s.

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Well, if this has become a political thread.....I can tell from Dorothy McGuire's apartment in Gentleman's Agreement that she was a Communist.

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I love the styles of the past, especially the Deco and Moderne styles of the 20s and 30s, and Mid-Century Modern from the 50s and early 60s. Seeing these styles in films from this period is one of the attractions of classic films for me.

 

Not to politicize this, but a presidential candidate is wanting to take us back to the (idealized) 50s, with the slogan to Make America Great Again. White men would run everything again, women would not be in the workplace, minorities would be in "their place", and gays back in the closet. There would be no place in this scheme for a black or a woman president.

A lot of people do have Nostalgia for the past until they realize that so many realities of the past can tend to be rather unpleasant to us today.

 

If you like westerns, just think if you would want to live with horses on the main roads. If you can't stand the heat, just think if you would like to live without air conditioning.

 

And if you were a woman, a gay person, or a black person, just think what your life would have been like in the twenties, thirties, forties, or fifties in the United States.

 

Maybe today should be considered the good old days.

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Well, if this has become a political thread.....I can tell from Dorothy McGuire's apartment in Gentleman's Agreement that she was a Communist.

I've never seen the film Gentlemen's Agreement. But I understand it's an excellent film about anti-Semitism in the United States in the fifties.

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Please do see Gentleman's Agreement. It's one of those films I over-analyze the sets, living in NYC. How did Gregory Peck get that apartment? Where does Celeste Holm live? Anne Revere opening up a box of Corn Flakes....

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I love the styles of the past, especially the Deco and Moderne styles of the 20s and 30s, and Mid-Century Modern from the 50s and early 60s. Seeing these styles in films from this period is one of the attractions of classic films for me.

 

Not to politicize this, but a presidential candidate is wanting to take us back to the (idealized) 50s, with the slogan to Make America Great Again. White men would run everything again, women would not be in the workplace, minorities would be in "their place", and gays back in the closet. There would be no place in this scheme for a black or a woman president.

 

That was tried in the 80's. The past is never as glorious as we believe it to be through rose colored glasses. Elvis and Buddy Holly aren't coming back. But, Chubby Checker and Chuck Berry are still around :lol: .

 

We don't need a president to bring back styles and attitudes. That we can do on our own.

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I love the scene where Anne Revere is unpacking in the new apartment. She takes candlestick holders from old newspaper and I always think That's Fabulous!

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