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50's Lifestyle


GGGGerald

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The listening booth that I remember best is the one in

Strangers on a Train  where Farley gets in a loud argument

with his soon to be ex-wife. It did look kind of cool.

 

Now vinyl is coming back after I switched many years ago

to CDs. Make up your minds. I have read that vinyl sales

are increasing, though they still make up a small part of

the market. I still have my old turntable and speakers, though

I haven't used them in a long time. So I'm prepared.

Actually purchased a turntable about a year or so ago.  Primary purpose was to transfer LP's to computer so I could then transfer them to CD or USB.  Actually only did a few LP's for which I have not been able to find CD's.

But also have it hooked to my receiver - seldom play LP's though.

One problem with turntables is that many use a rubber band to turn the table.  Over time they deteriorate, especially if not used often.

If you have not used your turntable in a long time, you probably need to try it to see if it still works.

Personally, I prefer CD's to LP's.  If there is a difference in sound, I can't tell it and CD's are not as easily scratched as LP's. Another advantage is that LP's are very heavy when you have several of them.

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Actually purchased a turntable about a year or so ago.  Primary purpose was to transfer LP's to computer so I could then transfer them to CD or USB.  Actually only did a few LP's for which I have not been able to find CD's.

But also have it hooked to my receiver - seldom play LP's though.

One problem with turntables is that many use a rubber band to turn the table.  Over time they deteriorate, especially if not used often.

If you have not used your turntable in a long time, you probably need to try it to see if it still works.

Personally, I prefer CD's to LP's.  If there is a difference in sound, I can't tell it and CD's are not as easily scratched as LP's. Another advantage is that LP's are very heavy when you have several of them.

 

My friend also transferred many rare jazz recording that were never released as CDs to CDs and USB  (I gave him the LPs since he is a collector in exchange for him giving me back a CD).      Worked well (except the sound volume is kind of low compared to a 'real' CD).   

 

What is funny is that when I have these in a mix on my NANO people will ask why there is a popping \ cracking sound.   Yea, the not so good old days of LPs!

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I also hate getting old. That's why I'm not.

 

Would somebody cue up Sinatra's "Young at Heart" for DGF here, please. I think I hear a song coming on.

 

Well, that recording WAS from the 1950s, and this thread IS about that decade, right?!

 

(...and so, how apropos, right?!) 

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My friend also transferred many rare jazz recording that were never released as CDs to CDs and USB (I gave him the LPs since he is a collector in exchange for him giving me back a CD). Worked well (except the sound volume is kind of low compared to a 'real' CD).

 

What is funny is that when I have these in a mix on my NANO people will ask why there is a popping \ cracking sound. Yea, the not so good old days of LPs!

I have software that allows me to convert old cassette tape recordings to mp3 files. I have one digital tune that was once an LP song on tape. You can clearly hear the popping and the "fsssssss" sound of the turntable needle on vinyl. It makes me smile, out of nostalgia and because it sounds so archaic these days, but I'm glad all my songs don't sound like that. ;)

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Actually purchased a turntable about a year or so ago.  Primary purpose was to transfer LP's to computer so I could then transfer them to CD or USB.  Actually only did a few LP's for which I have not been able to find CD's.

But also have it hooked to my receiver - seldom play LP's though.

One problem with turntables is that many use a rubber band to turn the table.  Over time they deteriorate, especially if not used often.

If you have not used your turntable in a long time, you probably need to try it to see if it still works.

Personally, I prefer CD's to LP's.  If there is a difference in sound, I can't tell it and CD's are not as easily scratched as LP's. Another advantage is that LP's are very heavy when you have several of them.

I have seen those advertised in magazines. I'm sure my turntable would

need a thorough going over to get it working again. I haven's used it in

about twenty years. CDs are certainly easier to store and handle than

LPs. I even had one of those static brushes and a little bottle of solution

to clean the needle off with.

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I have seen those advertised in magazines. I'm sure my turntable would

need a thorough going over to get it working again. I haven's used it in

about twenty years. CDs are certainly easier to store and handle than

LPs. I even had one of those static brushes and a little bottle of solution

to clean the needle off with.

 

Yeah, I had and still have the whole DISCWASHER set.   Some guys I know also had that little gun that was supposed to eliminate IONS from the platters.

 

I also have a "direct drive" turntable, so the rubber band isn't an issue.  But I keep it hooked up to another old MARANTZ reciever I have down in the basement, which is where I store all the old vinyl LPs I still keep, and where I listen to them from time to time.

 

Not ALL of the old LPs I have have been re-issued on CD, and those I never got around to buying my daughter downloaded and burned for me.  And I don't feel like shelling out the bucks for one of those turntables that'll  enable me to convert the others.  They're still in good enough shape.

 

To the discerning ear, there IS a difference in sound between LPs and CDs.  To me, the vinyl has a "richer" sound to them.  But even between CDs there's a difference depending on the method used for "burning" the CD originally.  There were three I know of:

 

DDD( digitally recorded, mixed and proccessed)  AAD( analog recorded, analog mixed and digitally proccessed) and ADD( analog recorded, digitally mixed and proccessed).  And IMO, AAD produces the closest to the vinyl "vibe".   DDD to me, always sounded too "sterile".

 

 

Sepiatone

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Would somebody cue up Sinatra's "Young at Heart" for DGF here, please. I think I hear a song coming on.

 

Well, that recording WAS from the 1950s, and this thread IS about that decade, right?!

 

(...and so, how apropos, right?!) 

I am young at face and body

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I have seen those advertised in magazines. I'm sure my turntable would

need a thorough going over to get it working again. I haven's used it in

about twenty years. CDs are certainly easier to store and handle than

LPs. I even had one of those static brushes and a little bottle of solution

to clean the needle off with.

There are actually two types.  One specifically to transfer to CD's, USB's, etc., but not sure if it can be connected to a receiver/amplifier or not.  Mine is a Sony from Best Buy and it primarily hooks to a receiver, but with a wire to connect to computer or other device.

If your turntable has a rubber drive belt, it is probably shot.  On my previous Pioneer one, it would have cost about $30+ just to get a new drive belt from them.  The belts also stretch over time.

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I've converted some LP's to CD and you are right about the sound.  Some of the LP's were one time productions of various artists.  But one LP is a Johnny Cash one which I have never been able to find.  Title is meaningless as it is Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits and he had several with that title.  It had a couple of songs on it that are not on any of his many CD's.

 

I have software that allows me to convert old cassette tape recordings to mp3 files. I have one digital tune that was once an LP song on tape. You can clearly hear the popping and the "fsssssss" sound of the turntable needle on vinyl. It makes me smile, out of nostalgia and because it sounds so archaic these days, but I'm glad all my songs don't sound like that. ;)

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I am young at face and body

And here we all just thought you were IMMATURE!  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

 

No, actually Sepia, what I think DGF was attempting to tell us here was that even at his age now days, he doesn't have any need of any of those little blue pills whenever.....

 

(...well, YOU know)  groucho_marx_emoticon_by_jakarnilson.gif

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Yeah, I had and still have the whole DISCWASHER set.   Some guys I know also had that little gun that was supposed to eliminate IONS from the platters.

 

I also have a "direct drive" turntable, so the rubber band isn't an issue.  But I keep it hooked up to another old MARANTZ reciever I have down in the basement, which is where I store all the old vinyl LPs I still keep, and where I listen to them from time to time.

 

Not ALL of the old LPs I have have been re-issued on CD, and those I never got around to buying my daughter downloaded and burned for me.  And I don't feel like shelling out the bucks for one of those turntables that'll  enable me to convert the others.  They're still in good enough shape.

 

To the discerning ear, there IS a difference in sound between LPs and CDs.  To me, the vinyl has a "richer" sound to them.  But even between CDs there's a difference depending on the method used for "burning" the CD originally.  There were three I know of:

 

DDD( digitally recorded, mixed and proccessed)  AAD( analog recorded, analog mixed and digitally proccessed) and ADD( analog recorded, digitally mixed and proccessed).  And IMO, AAD produces the closest to the vinyl "vibe".   DDD to me, always sounded too "sterile".

 

 

Sepiatone

The ones I've seen that just convert LPS to CDs aren't that expensive,

but they look kind of clunky and old fashioned. I haven't bought too

many CDs that I already own as LPs. And due to all that LP maintenance,

they're in pretty good condition.

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There are actually two types.  One specifically to transfer to CD's, USB's, etc., but not sure if it can be connected to a receiver/amplifier or not.  Mine is a Sony from Best Buy and it primarily hooks to a receiver, but with a wire to connect to computer or other device.

If your turntable has a rubber drive belt, it is probably shot.  On my previous Pioneer one, it would have cost about $30+ just to get a new drive belt from them.  The belts also stretch over time.

I'm sure it needs maintenance, and there is probably somebody around

here who does that kind of work. Maybe one of these days if I have

enough energy I'll resemble everything and get out my LPs. I kind of

miss them if only for nostalgic reasons.

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I'm sure it needs maintenance, and there is probably somebody around

here who does that kind of work. Maybe one of these days if I have

enough energy I'll resemble everything and get out my LPs. I kind of

miss them if only for nostalgic reasons.

The maintenance, if anyone does it, would probably cost a lot more than a new turntable.

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The maintenance, if anyone does it, would probably cost a lot more than a new turntable.

It probably would. But in general all the components are in

good shape and are still in their original boxes, just need some

maintenance. And it still looks pretty sharp, so I would definitely

hang onto it.

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Personally, I prefer CD's to LP's.  If there is a difference in sound, I can't tell it and CD's are not as easily scratched as LP's. Another advantage is that LP's are very heavy when you have several of them.


 

Haha weight can be a factor...

 

But as a former "audiophile" I can tell you CDs vs vinyl wholly depends on the system you're playing them on. 

 

Quality vinyl, when played on a really good system is AMAZING. It can sonically put you right in the room, where you hear the actual "presence" of those performing. I used to test equipment for a high end seller, and listening to the Verve recordings on vinyl of Ella Fitzgerald was AMAZING. 

 

With a typical commercially available turntable stereo system like my 80's Sony, those same records sound, well, ordinary. There IS a world of difference between a $50 stylus and a $500 stylus.

 

And it goes the same way with CDs. I had played my Morrecone box set on one of those high end systems and it sounded good, definitely better than my cr8ppy little $100 Sony CD player.

I then played THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL on the high end system and it was flat & tinny while it sounded full & great on my cr8ppy home player.

 

It all depends on your level of interest. Most people don't care.

 

Which reminds me of photography. I actually take my pictures to a real photography processing (!) studio to be printed, because I expect quality prints. (yeah I used to be in THAT dead business too)

 

Most people I know (if they print photos at all) print from their computer or take pictures to some big box store to be printed. I'm AGHAST at the poor quality acceptable by most people. Their prints look like photo copies from a copier.

 

Like I said, most people just don't care about quality anymore. They just don't even recognise it.
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Personally, I prefer CD's to LP's.  If there is a difference in sound, I can't tell it and CD's are not as easily scratched as LP's. Another advantage is that LP's are very heavy when you have several of them.

 
Haha weight can be a factor...
 
But as a former "audiophile" I can tell you CDs vs vinyl wholly depends on the system you're playing them on. 
 
Quality vinyl, when played on a really good system is AMAZING. It can sonically put you right in the room, where you hear the actual "presence" of those performing. I used to test equipment for a high end seller, and listening to the Verve recordings on vinyl of Ella Fitzgerald was AMAZING. 
 
With a typical commercially available turntable stereo system like my 80's Sony, those same records sound, well, ordinary. There IS a world of difference between a $50 stylus and a $500 stylus.
 
And it goes the same way with CDs. I had played my Morrecone box set on one of those high end systems and it sounded good, definitely better than my cr8ppy little $100 Sony CD player.
I then played THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL on the high end system and it was flat & tinny while it sounded full & great on my cr8ppy home player.
 
It all depends on your level of interest. Most people don't care.
 
Which reminds me of photography. I actually take my pictures to a real photography processing (!) studio to be printed, because I expect quality prints. (yeah I used to be in THAT dead business too)
 
Most people I know (if they print photos at all) print from their computer or take pictures to some big box store to be printed. I'm AGHAST at the poor quality acceptable by most people. Their prints look like photo copies from a copier.
 
Like I said, most people just don't care about quality anymore. They just don't even recognise it.

 

 

We're kindred spirits in BOTH of those things, Tiki.

 

I too, am an "audiophile" (not "former" as I refuse to give up on quality sound reproduction equipment) and an ex wedding film photographer.  Nothing rankles me MORE than some gink pushing some idiotic "device" in my face and insisting I "swipe" through a parade of substandard images.  OR listen to their latest "download" on a device that can't even deliver sound as good as those old pocket transistor radios from the late '50's and early '60's.

 

ECCCHHH!

 

Incidentally, I MISS my old BANG & OLUFSEN system I had from the early '80's.  Should have took it WITH me when I moved out from my ex.  Before I knew it, she traded it to her DEALER to cover her COKE DEBT!  ARRGGHHH!

 

Sepiatone

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Little off topic, but CD players in new cars are disappearing.  I think you can get a single CD player in the new Lincoln Continental for about $350 as an accessory.  Some don't have them at all.

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Little off topic, but CD players in new cars are disappearing.  I think you can get a single CD player in the new Lincoln Continental for about $350 as an accessory.  Some don't have them at all.

The first record I remember listening to as a little kid was the soundtrack of "Call Me Mister". It was a few 78 RPM records, which my grandparents owned.

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Little off topic, but CD players in new cars are disappearing.  I think you can get a single CD player in the new Lincoln Continental for about $350 as an accessory.  Some don't have them at all.

 

Yeah I know.  And it's kinda sad.  I spend a LOT of time listening to my collection of "self made" CD compilations while driving around.  I'm hanging onto my 11 year old Chevy Equinox because of the CD player.  I REFUSE to let the market make me sheep-like purchase something I'm not in the least interested in.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Yeah I know.  And it's kinda sad.  I spend a LOT of time listening to my collection of "self made" CD compilations while driving around.  I'm hanging onto my 11 year old Chevy Equinox because of the CD player.  I REFUSE to let the market make me sheep-like purchase something I'm not in the least interested in.

 

 

Sepiatone

Actually have a car with a six CD changer.  Will have to keep the car a long time just for that.

Only salvation is that some cars have connections for a USB Flash Drive.  I record CD's to my PC and then to the USB for my wife's vehicle.  Learned hard way to record to the PC, save it and then transfer to the USB in case the USB fails in future.

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Yeah I know.  And it's kinda sad.  I spend a LOT of time listening to my collection of "self made" CD compilations while driving around.  I'm hanging onto my 11 year old Chevy Equinox because of the CD player.  I REFUSE to let the market make me sheep-like purchase something I'm not in the least interested in.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

CD players in a car serve no purpose.   I have a NANO that has over 3,000 songs on it and it wasn't expensive.   I also love my own compilations but instead of having to load a CD as well as storing CDs in my car,  my NANO has a playlist and I have all my compilations there.        

 

Can you explain why you prefer individual CDs,  especially for a car?        

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CD players in a car serve no purpose.   I have a NANO that has over 3,000 songs on it and it wasn't expensive.   I also love my own compilations but instead of having to load a CD as well as storing CDs in my car,  my NANO has a playlist and I have all my compilations there.        

 

Can you explain why you prefer individual CDs,  especially for a car?        

 

I guess there are those who are happy with 20 songs or so.

 

I have two mp3 players with about 700 songs a piece. And my phone has another 1,500. That's in addition to the numerous internet stations I listen to.

 

Reminds me of the time recently I was at a food stand waiting for some food. I heard some Hank Ballard (50's) coming out of a car. I walked over to the driver and asked where he got that from. He showed me his daughter connected his cell to his car sound system and found a fifties station. And he was rocking and rolling !

 

I'm sure there were those who though John Henry was superior to the steam engine also. To each their own.

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Eeh! When it comes to car audio systems, I think we all ought'a go back to a time when like this young man here in his '59 Caddy Coupe Deville, we could play the latest hit 45's on our under-dash installed record player...

 

lawxtcY.jpg

 

(...btw...anybody know whatever became of this young man?...he looks kind'a familiar)

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Little off topic, but CD players in new cars are disappearing.  I think you can get a single CD player in the new Lincoln Continental for about $350 as an accessory.  Some don't have them at all.

I used to listen to CDs in my car until I got an iPod... Now I just connect a power cord to that thing and I have 1,000 songs right there. I can also switch the songs and still be able to drive safely (harder to change a CD that way).

 

I can't post photos on my phone, but in the Laurel and Hardy short BUSY BODIES Stan and Ollie are driving and Ollie tells Stan to "change the music". Stan gets out, opens the hood and you see a complete turntable. Stan reaches for a new vinyl disc and pops it on, lol!

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