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50's Lifestyle


GGGGerald

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Personally, I prefer CD's to LP's. If there is a difference in sound, I can't tell it and CD's are not as easily scratched as LP's. Another advantage is that LP's are very heavy when you have several of them.

 

Haha weight can be a factor...

 

But as a former "audiophile" I can tell you CDs vs vinyl wholly depends on the system you're playing them on.

 

Quality vinyl, when played on a really good system is AMAZING. It can sonically put you right in the room, where you hear the actual "presence" of those performing. I used to test equipment for a high end seller, and listening to the Verve recordings on vinyl of Ella Fitzgerald was AMAZING.

 

With a typical commercially available turntable stereo system like my 80's Sony, those same records sound, well, ordinary. There IS a world of difference between a $50 stylus and a $500 stylus.

Wow, now I'm really curious to hear what that sounds like... I remember being amazed when I first started hearing the clarity in digital music (like, instruments I didn’t know were on these songs), but we didn't have that kind of high-end LP player growing up (since this thread is about the '50s, should I say, Hi-Fi?). My dream is to have these huge, concert quality speakers blasting my favorites.

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About the only time I listen to CDs is when I'm in my car.

Other than that I don't seem to have the time. I'm used

to the old LP/CD format, one album with 12 or so songs.

Too late to change now.

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Eugenia said: Wow, now I'm really curious to hear what that sounds like... I remember being amazed when I first started hearing the clarity in digital music (like, instruments I didn’t know were on these songs), but we didn't have that kind of high-end LP player growing up (since this thread is about the '50s, should I say, Hi-Fi?). My dream is to have these huge, concert quality speakers blasting my favorites. 

 

Hi-fi refers to "high fidelity" which is inferior to stereo imho. Nowadays bigger speakers do not necessarily mean better. When my audiophile bf would come home with a new component he'd say, "I can't buy a bigger schl0ng, but I can always buy bigger speakers!" 

 

Start saving. Those B&O's Sepiatone mentioned run in the hundreds of dollars. Our complete home system was valued over $30k (worth more than the house!) and that was the 80's. The only thing I took when I left was a set of spun brass tip toes!

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Can you explain why you prefer individual CDs,  especially for a car?        

 

Mostly because  I can choose WHICH certain number of songs( and which ones)  I feel like listening to instead of searching through 3,000+ to get to what I want.  All of my "compilations" are typically "genre specific" and songs(or tunes) by certain artists are usually grouped "end to end" ie:  If there's three or four or more by say, CAT STEVENS, then they'll one after another.  With only 24 or so songs on each CD it's much easier and less time consuming to "skip" to something else I might like.   I already know WHERE on the CD it may be, and won't have to go from track 5  to 1567 to see IF it's at that number.

 

Sepiatone

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 Nowadays bigger speakers do not necessarily mean better.

 

Nowadays?  Huh.

 

That B&O system I spoke of was, remember, in the early '80's.  The speakers I had with it measured only about two feet high and a little over one foot wide and six inches deep.  5-way speakers that had MUCH better sound than their PIONEER, JBL, BOZAK and Marantz contemporaries TWICE to THREE TIMES their size.  And I only got the B&O because it was hard to get GRUNDIG components where I lived.

 

And you're right about it being expensive!

 

But WELL WORTH every penny.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Nowadays?  Huh.

 

That B&O system I spoke of was, remember, in the early '80's.  The speakers I had with it measured only about two feet high and a little over one foot wide and six inches deep.  5-way speakers that had MUCH better sound than their PIONEER, JBL, BOZAK and Marantz contemporaries TWICE to THREE TIMES their size.  And I only got the B&O because it was hard to get GRUNDIG components where I lived.

 

And you're right about it being expensive!

 

But WELL WORTH every penny.

 

 

Sepiatone

...as I sit hear in tattered clothes, with my stomach growling, listening through my speakers.

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...as I sit hear in tattered clothes, with my stomach growling, listening through my speakers.

 

"Hear"?  or did you mean "here"?

 

Get off of FACEBOOK already and get back to the "grown-up" world, "Mr. Precocious"!   ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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CD players in a car serve no purpose.   I have a NANO that has over 3,000 songs on it and it wasn't expensive.   I also love my own compilations but instead of having to load a CD as well as storing CDs in my car,  my NANO has a playlist and I have all my compilations there.        

 

Can you explain why you prefer individual CDs,  especially for a car?        

Because I have hundreds of them.  In addition, the sound is better than something that has been transferred.  I know there is a lot of debate about that, but I know what I hear.

We have a vehicle with a USB connection to the audio and we have used PC to record CD's directly to the USB.  While sound from USB is good, the same CD sounds better.

Another car has a hard drive on which I have over 1,000 songs that were recorded directly from the CD player in the car.  Sound is good, but not quite as good as the CD's.

For the conveinence, we use the USB or the hard drive.

The other advantage is that you might have CD's that you have not recorded to another device.  For example, have about 20+ Christmas CD's and since only play them this time of year, don't want to transfer to USB or hard drive.  There are some others I want to listen to occasionally.

Primary advantage to having at least a single player in cars is for the many (mostly older) people who have hundreds of CD's they would like to listen to without having to obtain another device or transferring.

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CD players in a car serve no purpose.   I have a NANO that has over 3,000 songs on it and it wasn't expensive.   I also love my own compilations but instead of having to load a CD as well as storing CDs in my car,  my NANO has a playlist and I have all my compilations there.        

 

Can you explain why you prefer individual CDs,  especially for a car?        

 

Aah! So THAT'S where I made my mistake when I wanted to upgrade and update my car's sound system, eh?!

 

Ya see, in order to save a little money I got the cheaper NANU system installed.

 

And now all it'll play are old Robin Williams routines from that early sitcom of his.

 

(...I mean sure, the guy's still funny and all, but I would occasionally like to hear some Beatles or maybe Stones stuff now and then, ya know) 

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Because I have hundreds of them.  In addition, the sound is better than something that has been transferred.  I know there is a lot of debate about that, but I know what I hear.

We have a vehicle with a USB connection to the audio and we have used PC to record CD's directly to the USB.  While sound from USB is good, the same CD sounds better.

Another car has a hard drive on which I have over 1,000 songs that were recorded directly from the CD player in the car.  Sound is good, but not quite as good as the CD's.

For the conveinence, we use the USB or the hard drive.

The other advantage is that you might have CD's that you have not recorded to another device.  For example, have about 20+ Christmas CD's and since only play them this time of year, don't want to transfer to USB or hard drive.  There are some others I want to listen to occasionally.

Primary advantage to having at least a single player in cars is for the many (mostly older) people who have hundreds of CD's they would like to listen to without having to obtain another device or transferring.

 

When you say you have hundreds, I assume you mean CDs.   I also have hundreds as well as the hundreds I 'traded' with friends and copied to a laptop computer.    But 90% of my music is available in a USB format (but your Christmas music example is a solid reason to NOT have all of one's CD transferred to USB).

 

With the noise produced while driving to me that difference in sound quality isn't worth the hassle.    (but in my music room I tend to play CD's for the sound qualify).   

 

I do have a CD player in my car as well as a USB port and I leave 2 or 3 CDs in the car as 'back-up'.     Generally I listen to sport-talk radio for short trips anyhow.     BUT if going on a longer trip and especially on a vacation I take the NANO. 

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I'm far from being an audiophile, but it's easy to fall under the

spell of an audiophile salesman. You really should get this,

and this, and this. So I got the monster cables and tiptoes

(damn those things are sharp) and some other paraphernalia.

I don't know if all this stuff really helped, but it looked good.

I've been thinking about this stuff so much, I just might drag

them out of the closet and, not set them up, but just sit

in silent admiration and touch them every once in a while.

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So I got the monster cables and tiptoes


(damn those things are sharp) and some other paraphernalia.


I don't know if all this stuff really helped


 


Commercial "monster" cables are better than commercially available "regular" cables, but only slightly. I'm talking about significantly higher end stuff. And all components need to be at a high level to make a difference. This is why I was a "tester" for equipment.


 


We had a very high end system. The salesman would bring over a new set of cables for example. I'd listen to an LP on my existing system, switch the cables and immediately listen to the same LP again. I'd report the differences. It may be very slight, or no difference at all. 


 


Nowadays, with my $300 1980 Sony turntable, no high end parts could improve the sound. It's just a cheap home use appliance. Records just sound like records. While on a big high end system, records sounded "real", "full" & multi dimensional.


 


Pretty much like the car audio discussed earlier.

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Actually, in audio as with photography, you find that you can substitute costly accesories with something less expensive and get similar results..To whit:

 

I got the same results metering off of the palm of my HAND as I could with a $5.00 GREY CARD.  Or fixing a white index card on the end of your flash unit with a rubber band and bending it 45 degrees over the flash lens will diffuse light with the same efficiency as some $20 + device will.

 

As for audio:   You could use "audio store" speaker wire sold for $$$ a 25ft. roll, or go to a hardware store and buy what you NEED in LAMP CORD @ PENNIES a FOOT!  As due to "polarity" requirements of electrical cords and plugs, the cording for it is RIBBED on one side and will help with determining your " - + "  designations.

 

But, back to the '50's-----

 

Back then, guys didn't MIND wearing blue jeans with the ends of the legs folded into CUFFS.

 

Girls who needed to wear glasses wouldn't have DREAMED of having any other frames than those "harlequin"  shaped ones, which WERE "all the rage" back then.

 

Khaki pants with pleats were OK for guys to wear without being considered "twerps".

 

There were NO "athletic shoes", just "sneakers"  and "tennis shoes",  which to most people were one in the same.  And NONE of them cost over about $5 a pair.    And there was probably only CONVERSE, KEDS and PF FLYERS.  If I missed a brand, let me know.

 

"Beachcomber" shirts and "Clamdigger" pants were a "rage" at one time for both guys AND girls.

 

And a lot of guys wore "varsity" style jackets even when they weren't on any team.

 

Then there's that style of shirt that RAFAEL CAMPOS wore in BLACKBOARD JUNGLE.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Discussion on another thread made me remember this.

In the 50's and 60's, a small town radio station began its broadcast day at 6:00 AM by playing Carolina in the Morning, Dixie and the National Anthem.  They signed off at 6:00 PM, but forget what they played then.

Of course TV stations "signed off" at either 11:00 PM or Midnight.

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Also usual in the '50's(and through the '60's as well...)

 

NO kid past the age of 11 or so wore a BASEBALL CAP uless he was in little league and in a game.  Same for older kids on the high school team.

 

OLD MEN wore hats of a similar style called "golf caps".  My Dad wore one up until the day he died, and always at a "rakish" tilt.

 

It's funny to me seeing guys as young as in their late teens and early 20's wearing similar caps and thinking they're so "cool".  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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So I got the monster cables and tiptoes

(damn those things are sharp) and some other paraphernalia.

I don't know if all this stuff really helped

 

Commercial "monster" cables are better than commercially available "regular" cables, but only slightly. I'm talking about significantly higher end stuff. And all components need to be at a high level to make a difference. This is why I was a "tester" for equipment.

 

We had a very high end system. The salesman would bring over a new set of cables for example. I'd listen to an LP on my existing system, switch the cables and immediately listen to the same LP again. I'd report the differences. It may be very slight, or no difference at all. 

 

Nowadays, with my $300 1980 Sony turntable, no high end parts could improve the sound. It's just a cheap home use appliance. Records just sound like records. While on a big high end system, records sounded "real", "full" & multi dimensional.

 

Pretty much like the car audio discussed earlier.

 

I was just in the medium end. I'm guessing it sounded better than some

cheap system. I was really more interested in the music itself than having

pure sound. I remember the salesman would pass out sheets listing all

the specifics along with a graph or two that was way beyond my understanding.

Okay, I'll take it.

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Back then, guys didn't MIND wearing blue jeans with the ends of the legs folded into CUFFS.


 


Being 5'2", this is a look I often rock until my jeans shrink to fit a little. I think it's pretty normal, but MrTiki thinks I'm trying to look like Fonzie.


 


There were NO "athletic shoes", just "sneakers"  and "tennis shoes",  which to most people were one in the same.  And NONE of them cost over about $5 a pair.    


 


So right. But peer pressure for the "right" sneakers was already starting in the 60's. The one & only time I ever was shopping with my Dad he wouldn't budge buying the white Keds for me. They had just started coming in colors, but they cost just a bit more. But no, Dad wouldn't hear of spending an extra dollar for anything so silly as red Keds that I would "just grow out of in 6 months".


 


Now THAT'S an insight to how kids were typically treated in the past!

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:D

 

Yeah, WHO that grew up in those days can FORGET Mom or Dad pressing their thumb down on the toe of a shoe they were trying on to see if there was "enough growing" room in them?

 

MY jeans of course, as I was a little kid in the late '50's, had cuffs six to eight inches high due to being bought long enough and BIG enough to get a few years of GROWTH out of them.  My jeans were also PLEATED due to cinching the belt so tightly because they were so "oversized" for the same reason.  :D

 

Yeah, nothing but WHITE "sneakers" for me too, Tiki.  But, given my enthusiasic level of play, they sure didn't STAY white for very long!  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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:D

 

Yeah, WHO that grew up in those days can FORGET Mom or Dad pressing their thumb down on the toe of a shoe they were trying on to see if there was "enough growing" room in them?

 

MY jeans of course, as I was a little kid in the late '50's, had cuffs six to eight inches high due to being bought long enough and BIG enough to get a few years of GROWTH out of them.  My jeans were also PLEATED due to cinching the belt so tightly because they were so "oversized" for the same reason.  :D

 

Yeah, nothing but WHITE "sneakers" for me too, Tiki.  But, given my enthusiasic level of play, they sure didn't STAY white for very long!  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

Well...of course we remember our parents pushing on the toes of our shoes but that was just part of the shoe buying process.  Who growing up in the early 50's can forget going to the shoe store and sticking our feet in that xray machine to see how much space was in your new shoes.   Your Mom would look in the machine and then make a decision as to whether the shoes were bought.  As to tennis shoes I cannot remember wearing any as a child, it was saddle shoes or loafers (newer ones for school, older ones for play). 

 

When it was time to allow me (note the term "allow me") to wear tennis shoes it was Keds and to this very day I still wear them.  I have them in white and navy blue and enjoy the fit and the price.  The tennis shoes look good with a variety of clothes and are definitely more stylish than clomping around in those huge trainers everyone wears. 

 

Cuffed jeans were not just for guys, my jeans were cuffed as well but I had the added benefit of getting to wear peddle pushers on the weekend and after school.  Other things I remember about the fifties were:

 

  • Toni Home Perms (oh my goodness how badly they smelled)
  • Home visits by doctors (I had scarlet fever and was isolated in my room) when diseases were contagious
  • Measles, mumps and chicken pox:  thankfully no more but I remember my mother sticking my brother in the room so he would contract whatever I had thus hoping for a lesser level of disease
  • Potato chips would come in tins:  mother saved them to store cookies in.
  • Refrigerators with a freezer the size of a shoe box and metal ice trays
  • Christmas lights that your father spent hours trying to find the one bulb that burned out the whole string
  • Bubble lights on Christmas trees
  • Popsicles made with Koolaide and popsicle sticks and formed in ice cube trays
  • Postman carrying leather satchels
  • Milkman and leaving notes in bottles for added orders
  • Milk with creme on the top which you had to shake before serving
  • Juke boxes at the booth
  • Howdy Doody
  • Double features on Saturday....
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:D

 

Yeah, WHO that grew up in those days can FORGET Mom or Dad pressing their thumb down on the toe of a shoe they were trying on to see if there was "enough growing" room in them?

 

MY jeans of course, as I was a little kid in the late '50's, had cuffs six to eight inches high due to being bought long enough and BIG enough to get a few years of GROWTH out of them.  My jeans were also PLEATED due to cinching the belt so tightly because they were so "oversized" for the same reason.  :D

 

Yeah, nothing but WHITE "sneakers" for me too, Tiki.  But, given my enthusiasic level of play, they sure didn't STAY white for very long!  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

High black Converse all stars was what the cool guys wore. High white Converse were also OK, as were desert boots.

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High black Converse all stars was what the cool guys wore. High white Converse were also OK, as were desert boots.

A classmate in college in about '67 got a pair of "DB's."  Never heard of them before that.  Did not look near as effective as the Desert Boots the Army issued me in '91 for Gulf War.  As for sneakers, they disappeared by Jr. High except for athletics and were replaced with Weejuns or comparable penny loafers.  Had to be cordavan colored.  In fact, most guys in my JHS and HS classes wore tennis shoes for athletics, except for the guys on the basketball team.

Don't actually remember having a pair of Keds or other brands of high top shoes.

 

As for testing shoe tips, remember the X-ray machines at shoe stores/departments?  Stick your foot in and see what foot really looks like in the shoe.  Don't think they lasted long and I'm sure there was medical controversy.

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