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50's Lifestyle


GGGGerald

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One problem with our push mower was that every time it went over a thicker clump of grass, the blades would stop turning. P***ed me off.

There was a lot of back up and go forward again with those things.

My father would buy a larger mower with increased cutting area

every couple of years. But compared with the riding mowers that

everybody around here has, they were dinky.

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I am amazed at the hatred lawn mowing is getting in this thread.

 

Personally, I hate grass and lawns in general...after all, why does anyone need a grazing pasture in the city or suburbs? Grass is cultivated to grow tall & fast. Wholly silly unless you have livestock.

 

Little by little I've expanded my gardens to take more lawn space over. And I've been replacing the nuisance grass with clover & dandelion. Clover feeds my wild bunnies & bees and does not grow over 4". Dandelions feed me. Earth Mother indeed.

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I am amazed at the hatred lawn mowing is getting in this thread.

 

Personally, I hate grass and lawns in general...after all, why does anyone need a grazing pasture in the city or suburbs? Grass is cultivated to grow tall & fast. Wholly silly unless you have livestock.

 

Little by little I've expanded my gardens to take more lawn space over. And I've been replacing the nuisance grass with clover & dandelion. Clover feeds my wild bunnies & bees and does not grow over 4". Dandelions feed me. Earth Mother indeed.

 

Writer Robert Fulghum had a take on stuff like that.  He'd refuse to rake the leaves every fall claiming that nature had a REASON to have leaves die and fall to the ground.  One he surmised was they serve as a natural "mulch".  I took him up on that.  And it worked.

 

The house I'm renting now, when I first moved in, had a huge area by the large Maple tree in the backyard that was pretty sparse "grass-wise".  Evertime I'd pass over it with the mower a huge plume of dust would fill the air.  So, when fall came, I never bothrered to rake up the ton of leaves that Maple would deposit on that area.  And SHO 'NUFF,  there's now thick, rich green GRASS growing where that sparseness was.

 

I too, used to "earn a living" going around the neighborhod cutting grass in the summer, AND shoveling snow come Winter.  But, the going rate in those days was $3.00 a yard or walk.  Since my "mini stroke" a couple of years ago, and now being on Coumadin therapy, AND my leg troubles, it's recommended that I don't do either of these things.  Luckily, I have a grandnephew who works for a landscaper and HE swings by and does the grass, but he also SWORE he'd drop by to shovel the walk, but never DID show up that last 9" we got about a week ago.  Did it myself and damn near wound up back in the hospital.  And surprisingly, there were NO KIDS going around looking for extra spending money! 

 

and...TIKI---

 

I LIKE the look of dandelions and leave them be.  I don't EAT them however, but do know they work well in salads.  My Dad HATED them however, and I recall the summer I was ordered to, before I went ANYWHERE, pull 50 A DAY from the backyard.  And with the ENTIRE ROOT.  No just the tops.  It's no wonder I have an ambivalence bordering on loathing for yardwork to this day.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Writer Robert Fulghum had a take on stuff like that. He'd refuse to rake the leaves every fall claiming that nature had a REASON to have leaves die and fall to the ground. One he surmised was they serve as a natural "mulch". I took him up on that. And it worked.

 

The house I'm renting now, when I first moved in, had a huge area by the large Maple tree in the backyard that was pretty sparse "grass-wise". Evertime I'd pass over it with the mower a huge plume of dust would fill the air. So, when fall came, I never bothrered to rake up the ton of leaves that Maple would deposit on that area. And SHO 'NUFF, there's now thick, rich green GRASS growing where that sparseness was.

 

I too, used to "earn a living" going around the neighborhod cutting grass in the summer, AND shoveling snow come Winter. But, the going rate in those days was $3.00 a yard or walk. Since my "mini stroke" a couple of years ago, and now being on Coumadin therapy, AND my leg troubles, it's recommended that I don't do either of these things. Luckily, I have a grandnephew who works for a landscaper and HE swings by and does the grass, but he also SWORE he'd drop by to shovel the walk, but never DID show up that last 9" we got about a week ago. Did it myself and damn near wound up back in the hospital. And surprisingly, there were NO KIDS going around looking for extra spending money!

 

and...TIKI---

 

I LIKE the look of dandelions and leave them be. I don't EAT them however, but do know they work well in salads. My Dad HATED them however, and I recall the summer I was ordered to, before I went ANYWHERE, pull 50 A DAY from the backyard. And with the ENTIRE ROOT. No just the tops. It's no wonder I have an ambivalence bordering on loathing for yardwork to this day.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

One of the reasons I recently sold our family home was because I didn't want to pay for the guy to cut the lawn and I didn't even want to talk about what he was going to charge me to trim all those bushes!

 

Since he was a "friend", he only charged me $50 for front and back.

In the nineteen-fifties the neighbor kid down the street cut it and I don't think it was $5.

 

My brother was supposed to cut it but he always said that he had allergies, so my mother cut it for him.

 

As for the snow - - the guy who was doing the driveway broke my electric garage door by piling the snow on top of it.

 

And if I didn't hire somebody to clear the sidewalk in front of my house, the city would give me a ticket.

 

And I don't want to talk about all the trees that had to be cut because of the electrical lines.

 

BTW-- Did I leave out the outside lights and the burglar alarm that I had to pay for that we didn't need in the 1950s?

 

 

Things were certainly cheaper in the 1950s.

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I am amazed at the hatred lawn mowing is getting in this thread.

 

Personally, I hate grass and lawns in general...after all, why does anyone need a grazing pasture in the city or suburbs? Grass is cultivated to grow tall & fast. Wholly silly unless you have livestock.

 

Little by little I've expanded my gardens to take more lawn space over. And I've been replacing the nuisance grass with clover & dandelion. Clover feeds my wild bunnies & bees and does not grow over 4". Dandelions feed me. Earth Mother indeed.

Instead of mowing the lawn, I should have just bought a sheep.

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We enjoy our lawn, but I have a riding mower for 98% of it and a walk-behind power mower for the other 2%.  My wife even uses the power mower upon occasion to mow the whole yard.  Counts as her walking exercise for the day.  We don't bag the grass clippings, but let them fertilize the lawn.

In the fall we use the riding mower with the bagger attached to vacum up the leaves (lots of trees) and use them to cover places where we do not want grass or anything else to grow.  Also use them to cover over flower beds for the winter.  It's Mother Nature's ground cover after all.

Most people pay someone to blow them onto the street and then let the city dispose of them.  Terrible waste of good leaves.  If they are bagged, farmers will pick them up for their fields.  Was on city council and picking up leaves was a major problem every year.  Town is not big enough to afford one of those leaf sucking trucks.  Besides you still have to empty them.

The nomenclature for lawn mowers is often confusing.  There are walk-behind push power mowers, self-propelled walk-behind mowers, lawn tractors, riding mowers (not same as a tractor) and the old faithful reel type push mower.

Actually don't mind vacuming the leaves or mowing the grass.  Actually gives me sort of a nostalgic feeling while doing it.

In the 50's/early 60's where I lived it was $2.00 per lawn and most were about 1/2 acre more or less.  Only lawn mowers I knew were kids, except for the wealthy that had some Black man to do chores around the property througout the year.

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We enjoy our lawn, but I have a riding mower for 98% of it and a walk-behind power mower for the other 2%.  My wife even uses the power mower upon occasion to mow the whole yard.  Counts as her walking exercise for the day.  We don't bag the grass clippings, but let them fertilize the lawn.

In the fall we use the riding mower with the bagger attached to vacum up the leaves (lots of trees) and use them to cover places where we do not want grass or anything else to grow.  Also use them to cover over flower beds for the winter.  It's Mother Nature's ground cover after all.

Most people pay someone to blow them onto the street and then let the city dispose of them.  Terrible waste of good leaves.  If they are bagged, farmers will pick them up for their fields.  Was on city council and picking up leaves was a major problem every year.  Town is not big enough to afford one of those leaf sucking trucks.  Besides you still have to empty them.

The nomenclature for lawn mowers is often confusing.  There are walk-behind push power mowers, self-propelled walk-behind mowers, lawn tractors, riding mowers (not same as a tractor) and the old faithful reel type push mower.

Actually don't mind vacuming the leaves or mowing the grass.  Actually gives me sort of a nostalgic feeling while doing it.

In the 50's/early 60's where I lived it was $2.00 per lawn and most were about 1/2 acre more or less.  Only lawn mowers I knew were kids, except for the wealthy that had some Black man to do chores around the property througout the year.

150 years ago, the wealthy men got their lawns done for free.

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Instead of mowing the lawn, I should have just bought a sheep.

 

THERE ya go!

 

I was considering a couple of Nanny goats.  My wife LOVES Feta cheese.  ;)

 

So, back to it....

 

What was the name of that bleach that used to be home delivered and came in glass gallon jugs with an orange label?

 

I keep thinking it was either JEWEL or possibly JAVEL, but can't find anything about it online.

 

There was also the brand of coffee called HOME COFFEE that would be delivered to your door by a guy driving a panel truck with the company's name emblazoned on it's sides.

 

And they lasted a bit into the '60's, but by the mid '60's, I was no longer awakened early Saturday mornings by some guy with an open backed station wagon driving slowly down the street yelling, "STRAW-berries!"   Straw-BERRIES!"   "CORN!  STRING beans!"

 

There WAS a guy known around Lincoln Park (at least the North end) called JOHNNY THE FRUIT MAN  who ambled around up and down streets in a rigged up red Step-Van.  I last surprisingly caught sight of him in the late '90's.  I thought he was long dead by then.  He never came around the neighborhood which I lived, but was a commonplace fixture in the parts of town some of my friends lived.  I had heard he died about 1998 at the age of 94, still cruising around town selling his fruit.

 

 

Sepiatone

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...Actually don't mind vacuming the leaves or mowing the grass.  Actually gives me sort of a nostalgic feeling while doing it.

 

I kind'a know what ya mean here, Cid.

 

While lawns are rare here in Sedona, as most landscaping around here is more of the desert variety and which of course doesn't require the watering that lawn grass does(remember, we out here in the west have been in somewhat of drought conditions for the last few years),  back when I lived in SoCal and while cutting my lawn, I remember thinking a whole of lot deep thoughts while walking behind my old power mower and cutting the grass.

 

(...okay, okay...the "deep thoughts" this noggin o' mine was equipped to supply me, anyway...and so maybe not all THAT "deep", huh)   ;)

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Princess O'Tap said: One of the reasons I recently sold our family home was because I didn't want to pay for the guy to cut the lawn and I didn't even want to talk about what he was going to charge me to trim all those bushes!

I find this all too common among younger people. They just find this sort of work, well WORK. I'm in Dargo's camp where I find gardening is a relaxing commune with nature. I nurture flora & fauna and wholly enjoy the excersize. IMO, the only people who should "hire out" is the elderly or infirm.

 

A 30 y/o gf just bought a house in the tonier section of my neighborhood and was AGHAST her lawn needed cutting every week or so, "I just DID IT!" she said, just like she once said about vacuuming. Obviously, her parents didn't require her to assist with household chores or she'd know this routine stuff.

 

I am forever amazed at what people are willing to pay others to do. But I'm one of those who does all my own home repairs, except electrical & plumbing (although I know HOW, I leave it to licensed professionals)

 

BTW-- Did I leave out the outside lights and the burglar alarm that I had to pay for that we didn't need in the 1950s?
Things were certainly cheaper in the 1950s. 

 

Heh, people made less money too, it's all relative. Alarms don't react fast enough for most thieves, they just grab & run. There's simpler ways to keep intruders out.

 

I feel no need to fortress my home- I own nothing worth stealing and live in the "un-toney" section exactly for that reason. Nothing says, "good stuff inside" more than a security coverage warning sign.

 

I've just decided to dump the f u g l y motion detector "security" floodlight my grandmother had installed at the front door in favor of a pretty period light. My big dog barking is enough "alarm" for me.

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I know MY limitations TIKI.  That's why I "hire out" some things like home repair.  Unless I wish my home to resemble PEE WEE'S PLAYHOUSE.

 

Plumbing?  Yeah, do most of it myself, and it IS basically simple, but annoyingly frustraing.  Do EVERYthing correctly, and you STILL have a leak somwhere!

 

And since they've used electricity as a means of EXECUTION, I pretty much leave it alone beyond changing outlets and switches.  And even THEN, I have to cut off ALL power and wrap electrical tape around any tools and wear heavy gloves!  :D

 

I've never found grdening to be either cathartic  OR theraputic.  And for me, like plumbing, try as I might it never worked out.  I joked once to my Mom, an EXCELLENT gardener, that , "I must have a BROWN THUMB."  My Dad, sitting nearby quipped, "I thought you got that from your WORK ETHIC."  :lol:

 

But, "Do-It-Yourself" became a HUGE thing in the '50's.  A lot of books and stores catering to it popped up around that time..

 

 

Sepiatone

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Reading all these comments about grass mowing and gardening and such caused me to nod my head in agreement and chuckle heartily.

 

Vautrin---You have my respect and condolences over your "cougar/non-cougar" experience!

Princess of Tap---Don't knock your brother!  I see him as a kindred spirit like me, since I have two older sisters who still haven't gotten over the fact that Mom liked me enough to bring me home from the hospital!

TikiSoo---You strike me as one of those "working smart as opposed to working hard" kind of people.  If you came to my neck of the woods, I'd put you up for a couple of days just for consultation about how to make my yard as eco-friendly as possible.

Sepiatone---Yessirree, good help is hard to find, and sometimes, the best person for the job is ourselves.  And, I do remember those 'crank top' power mowers you described, although my family never owned one.

Dargo---Mowing grass IS therapeutic for me too.  I've solved many a world problem in the 90 minutes it takes to do my yard.  More often than not though, I get stuck on music and play it over and over in my head.  Usually, 3 or 4 songs is enough to see me through the task.

The Cid---I don't mess with grass clippings either.  Where they lay is where they stay.

Down Goes Frazier---150 years ago, people would have expected compensation for doing such yard work/gardening.  160 years ago...yeah, you hit the nail on the head!

 

I live on a short street consisting of 2 blocks and 10 residences.  I am one of two people on my street that uses a push mower, and my yard is the second largest of the bunch.  My machine is a mulcher, so I don't bag up my clippings.  This year, I had eye surgery in early May (retina and eye wall had separation issues, and the retina decided to detach from the relationship).  I hired a guy to mow my grass until my doctor cleared me to do it myself.  He did it once, then I never saw him again!  Fortunately, my neighbor took pity on my plight, and my overgrown and ugly yard, and did it once.  After that, I was able to do it myself.  But, the clippings were so bad with two mowings in four weeks I felt compelled to rake them up since their presence prevented me from getting that "Better Homes and Gardens" look to the grass.  I put the clippings in paper grocery bags to let the stuff 'cure', then burned it all in early November.  I only have one deciduous tree in my yard, so I don't rake leaves.  However, leaves from all my neighbors' trees find a home at my place!  I used to rake those up too and burn them in Spring, but not anymore.  I have a couple of ditches along two sides of my yard which I do rake out so as not to impede drainage following a heavy rain or a rapid snow melt.

 

I don't mind shoveling snow, but since I'm not working anymore, it;s not a top priority of mine to complete the task so I can get to work on time.

 

Agree about the manual push mowers.  Sure, they were quiet, but they were a bear for a 10-year old kid to handle, and as mentioned, you had to re-mow areas if the grass were too high.  They were also not very user-friendly if the yard you were cutting had some slope or undulation in it.

 

As for dandelions, my grandmother would pick them for salads in the springtime.  I see them as a nuisance.  I've always said that the man or woman who could develop a way to convert dandelions into sustainable energy would be forever praised by school children in textbooks throughout the ages!

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Reading all these comments about grass mowing and gardening and such caused me to nod my head in agreement and chuckle heartily.

 

Vautrin---You have my respect and condolences over your "cougar/non-cougar" experience!

Princess of Tap---Don't knock your brother!  I see him as a kindred spirit like me, since I have two older sisters who still haven't gotten over the fact that Mom liked me enough to bring me home from the hospital!

TikiSoo---You strike me as one of those "working smart as opposed to working hard" kind of people.  If you came to my neck of the woods, I'd put you up for a couple of days just for consultation about how to make my yard as eco-friendly as possible.

Sepiatone---Yessirree, good help is hard to find, and sometimes, the best person for the job is ourselves.  And, I do remember those 'crank top' power mowers you described, although my family never owned one.

Dargo---Mowing grass IS therapeutic for me too.  I've solved many a world problem in the 90 minutes it takes to do my yard.  More often than not though, I get stuck on music and play it over and over in my head.  Usually, 3 or 4 songs is enough to see me through the task.

The Cid---I don't mess with grass clippings either.  Where they lay is where they stay.

Down Goes Frazier---150 years ago, people would have expected compensation for doing such yard work/gardening.  160 years ago...yeah, you hit the nail on the head!

 

I live on a short street consisting of 2 blocks and 10 residences.  I am one of two people on my street that uses a push mower, and my yard is the second largest of the bunch.  My machine is a mulcher, so I don't bag up my clippings.  This year, I had eye surgery in early May (retina and eye wall had separation issues, and the retina decided to detach from the relationship).  I hired a guy to mow my grass until my doctor cleared me to do it myself.  He did it once, then I never saw him again!  Fortunately, my neighbor took pity on my plight, and my overgrown and ugly yard, and did it once.  After that, I was able to do it myself.  But, the clippings were so bad with two mowings in four weeks I felt compelled to rake them up since their presence prevented me from getting that "Better Homes and Gardens" look to the grass.  I put the clippings in paper grocery bags to let the stuff 'cure', then burned it all in early November.  I only have one deciduous tree in my yard, so I don't rake leaves.  However, leaves from all my neighbors' trees find a home at my place!  I used to rake those up too and burn them in Spring, but not anymore.  I have a couple of ditches along two sides of my yard which I do rake out so as not to impede drainage following a heavy rain or a rapid snow melt.

 

I don't mind shoveling snow, but since I'm not working anymore, it;s not a top priority of mine to complete the task so I can get to work on time.

 

Agree about the manual push mowers.  Sure, they were quiet, but they were a bear for a 10-year old kid to handle, and as mentioned, you had to re-mow areas if the grass were too high.  They were also not very user-friendly if the yard you were cutting had some slope or undulation in it.

 

As for dandelions, my grandmother would pick them for salads in the springtime.  I see them as a nuisance.  I've always said that the man or woman who could develop a way to convert dandelions into sustainable energy would be forever praised by school children in textbooks throughout the ages!

I never got compensated for the work I did on the lawn. I guess that made me a..................

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I never got compensated for the work I did on the lawn. I guess that made me a..................

Rube?  Sap?  Sucker?  Maroon? ;) 

 

I didn't usually get paid any money for specifically mowing grass as a kid since I did it at home and for other relatives, but my folks and other relation were not stingy with giving me money if I wanted to go up town to the movies or go to a basketball or football game at the local high school.

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Rube?  Sap?  Sucker?  Maroon? ;)

 

I didn't usually get paid any money for specifically mowing grass as a kid since I did it at home and for other relatives, but my folks and other relation were not stingy with giving me money if I wanted to go up town to the movies or go to a basketball or football game at the local high school.

Did they want to know what the movie was? Did it have to be G-rated?

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Reading all these comments about grass mowing and gardening and such caused me to nod my head in agreement and chuckle heartily.

 

Vautrin---You have my respect and condolences over your "cougar/non-cougar" experience!

 

She was a kindly old woman, but she did like to reminisce.

 

I like the look of dandelions, and they are hard to get up by

the root. I just leave them until they turn into white fluff and

blow away. My mother had a garden and a smaller patch

for rose bushes, which I had to keep clean. That was the last

time I did any gardening. All those creepy crawling things

hiding among the weeds and dirt. Japanese beetles were

pretty disgusting. 

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Did they want to know what the movie was? Did it have to be G-rated?

 

Sometimes they did inquire, but most of the stuff I went to see was PG rated, or an occasional M.  Remember those?

 

Although I've told the following story before around here, this reminds me of the time one of my buddies in junior high and I were all set to go see Vincent Price in DR. GOLDFOOT AND THE BIKINI MACHINE,  but once his mother heard of it, figuring it would probably much too risque for his 13 y/o tender eyes, she wouldn't allow him to go.

 

And yeah, like Sepia said, this was in '65 and thus a few years before Jack Valenti started his MPAA ratings system in '68.

 

(...and btw, I just looked up this film's MPAA rating, and its now rated "G")

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Sepiatone said: I know MY limitations that's why I "hire out" some things like home repair. 


 


Of course. But I was referring to the 30 y/o I know who is annoyed her lawn needs to be mowed every 10 days. She is extremely annoyed with the burdens of home ownership. And really, someone with her outlook really doesn't benefit from being a home owner. Many contemporaries of mine are selling their homes & moving into condos or downtown apartments realizing they just don't NEED their own home & it's upkeep. Money pit indeed. Time "pit" as well!


 


Plumbing?  Yeah, do most of it myself, and it IS basically simple, but annoyingly frustraing.  Do EVERYthing correctly, and you STILL have a leak somwhere!


 


Heh, I thought that was just me!


 


And since they've used electricity as a means of EXECUTION, I pretty much leave it alone beyond changing outlets and switches. 


 


Ohmigod too funny! I'm going to use that line next time an electrician comes over! (although I do rewire fixtures as part of my restoration business-but they're not plugged into anything)


 


Sepia, I didn't answer about the bleach because I've never heard of "home delivered bleach". Crazy!


 


And I inherited my grandmother's "dandelion puller" which looks just like a forked "weed puller" but it has a 3 foot handle so you don't have to bend down. Makes harvesting in a 40x75 foot lawn a quick half hour's work. No fear- you still never get the entire root & have more plants in a few weeks. Worst part is I'll have a garbage bag full of dandy leaves that make one small bowl of greens!


 


Anyone here know of Utica Beans & Greens? I'm sure it's just a typical Italian dish, but Utica (home of Annette Funicello) has a big Italian population and it's served in every restaurant there.


"Beans & Greens" seems to be migrating throughout upstate NY & restaurants are now including it as a "specialty" on their menu.

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TIKI:

 

Our "weed puller" was only TWO feet long in entirety!  Spent LOTS of time on my hands and knees.

 

My wife said HER Mother too, used to get that bleach, but she couldn't remember the name either.

 

When I was in the 4th grade,  we had a new student come into class who was a recent Italian immigrant( Wanda Paoletti, who grew to YUM proportions by high school!)  One day after recess, she proudly walked up to Mrs. Riley(our teacher) and handed her a bouquet of DANDELION BLOOMS.  We all snickered, and it was then Mrs. Riley told us all about how dandelions were considered a delicacy in Italy.  The leaves being eaten and the "flowers" used in making wine, and that giving the blooms as a gift was treasured  rather than something to laugh about.  Our class was assigned when she first came in, to help her to speak English.  Thinking back, Us being AMERICAN kids, it's surprising she learned anything at ALL about speaking ENGLISH!  :D

 

And no, it isn't just you as far as plumbing goes.  ;)

 

 

 

 

Sepiatone

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Just finished watching "A Christmas Story" and for all of us blogging on the 50's you are able to see a glimpse into the past with everything from the autos, the home washing products and other little tidbits that encouraged nostalgia:

 

  • wringer washing machines
  • coal furnaces
  • Oxydol washing powder
  • Look magazine
  • floor radios
  • rubber boots
  • mittens on strings
  • snow suits
  • Palmer Method of handwriting (with examples posted all around the room)
  • Big Chief Writing Tablets
  • Chalk boards; and of course
  • Daisy Red Ryder BB Guns

Merry Christmas and Happy Chanukah

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Notice too, that the year stamped on Ralphie's "secret decoder pin" is 1940.

 

My mom liked this movie because, being 14 in that year, most of the look was "spot on", with a few exceptions, but she says most of everything else is "copasetic".

 

I grew up in the '50's (b.1951) and we had a "wringer washer"  in the basemeent, and I remember tossing in big lumps of coal in our furnace, and the Big Chief notebooks and those "Palmer Method" illustration "bands" arount the tops of the walls in my classrooms.

 

We called it "Script" instead of "cursive" as I recall though.

 

And those golashes!  With the weird kind of fasteners with the slotted tabs.  Somebody gave my mom the idea to use BREAD BAGS over our feet for the easy putting on and emoval of those boots.  Otherwise your SHOE would come off with it!

 

And I remember the referrence to the mittens with strings in an old BILL COSBY routine where he called them "idiot mittens".  And got a kick out of pulling on one of them when a kid was wearing them, and seeing him slap himsef in the face!  :D

 

Sepiatone

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encouraged nostalgia:


  •  
  • coal furnaces

My store sell rice coal & nut coal for furnaces. We often sell out. Old fashioned yes, but still very much in use today.


  •  
  • floor radios

I have one & love the rich sound!


  • rubber boots

We sell those too! The brand name (funnily enough) is Tingley! Who wants a pair of Tingley Rubbers?


Yeah, those buckle locking clasps are unique. Satisfying SNAP as they close.


  • snow suits

I wear a ski snowsuit to walk the dog-hey-it's Sibera-cuse. I feel like a moon man because it insulates like a spacesuit & feels just as bulky. Neighbors often comment when they see my real size in summer.


  •  
  • Chalk boards

A huge fad in the craft business. Everyone has speshel chalkboard signs & labels in their kitchens & bedrooms.


I love real chalkboards with the long, shallow wooden pan along the bottom.


  • Daisy Red Ryder BB Guns

Another Xmas sellout in the store I work in. Has "nostalgia" rope lettering and a photo of Ralphie on it. Can you imagine being Peter Billingsley and having your childhood photo as a traditional symbol of others' Christmas?


 


220px-Peter_Billingsley_at_ATX_TV_Festiv

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Well, nobody in MY "circle" knew anything about "Red Ryder" BB guns, but we knew about BB guns for sure.  DAISY brand of course.

 

I could never have one, but not because of the "shoot your eye out" factor, but the cost.  Just the AIR RIFLE alone did cost less, but not ENOUGH less in my case.  And friends who did have one but that didn't shoot BBs were content enough to jam the end of the barrel into the ground and fill it with dirt and shoot IT.  ;)

 

I don't have any chalkboards ANYWHERE in my house.  But both my KIDS had one in their rooms when they were little.  But as they're both in their 40's, tells you how long ago THAT was!  But yeah, I see the ones you're talking about in donut shops and some diners around town quite often.  Announcing the day's "specials".

 

 

Sepiatone

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