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POT: I agree with you that while we watched "Leave it to Beaver" and "Father Knows Best" on TV a large majority of us had parents with inclusiveness and awareness of the importance of knowing and understanding the goings on in the greater world. I believe that many of us lucky enough to have our parents survived WWII this group of parents were eager for their children to not experience what they did...so they did educate us informally through their own lives and through the information they exposed us to. We enjoyed the 50's but we were not isolated.

 

We too, watched the news on CBS (Walter was a favourite of my parents having begun his broadcasting career with Ed Murrow in London), however since we lived on CST we watched prior to supper (TV was not allowed at dinner time) and as we had both a morning an evening paper, the latest edition was available for review after dinner. My parents subscribed to Time and we looked forward to its weekly arrival. Since there was no TV or any other items allowed at the table there was a generous amount of conversation between our parents.

 

Back to the WWII connection and our 50's upbringing...many of our parents had been overseas, met many people outside of their American cocoon and lived and died as the result of decisions made by others. Consequently I believe this gave them a more realistic view of the world around them, consequently we received the benefit of their perspectives. My parents were both immigrants consequently we were exposed even more to information sources from outside the US and viewpoints shaded with their experiences as immigrants. Thanks for a great discussion re: nostalgia.

Emily - - very interesting. I can recall that we had some Polish immigrants, really refugees who lived down the street from us. And they were often coming in to tell us stories about what happened to them during the war.

 

My father was in the European theater during World War II. I think that had a lot to do with his attitude in terms of our home education. He Insisted upon teaching us the Holocaust, even though we were still in the primary grades.

 

On Sundays we had to watch Walter Cronkite's 20th century and get the Real documentary rundown on the Third Reich. And in Life Magazine we had to study and discuss the pictorial essays on the death camps. I think the photograph that impressed me the most was the commandant's wife who had a lampshade made from the skin of Jewish Holocaust victims.

 

When the Civil Rights Movement started, he insisted that we follow it in the same manner.

 

While our upbringing was Carefree, a lot of fun, especially in the summer - - we were forced to understand and identify with inhumanity in the world so that when we grew up we would be able to identify and fight it.

 

If I had to compare my childhood home life with a TV show, I think it would be more like My Three Sons than Leave it to Beaver because our house was never quite that neat or that formal and because we had dogs like Tramp. LOL

 

But it's fun to reminisce.

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Emily - - very interesting. I can recall that we had some Polish immigrants, really refugees who lived down the street from us. And they were often coming in to tell us stories about what happened to them during the war.

 

My father was in the European theater during World War II. I think that had a lot to do with his attitude in terms of our home education. He Insisted upon teaching us the Holocaust, even though we were still in the primary grades.

 

On Sundays we had to watch Walter Cronkite's 20th century and get the Real documentary rundown on the Third Reich. And in Life Magazine we had to study and discuss the pictorial essays on the death camps. I think the photograph that impressed me the most was the commandant's wife who had a lampshade made from the skin of Jewish Holocaust victims.

 

When the Civil Rights Movement started, he insisted that we follow it in the same manner.

 

While our upbringing was Carefree, a lot of fun, especially in the summer - - we were forced to understand and identify with inhumanity in the world so that when we grew up we would be able to identify and fight it.

 

If I had to compare my childhood home life with a TV show, I think it would be more like My Three Sons than Leave it to Beaver because our house was never quite that neat or that formal and because we had dogs like Tramp. LOL

 

But it's fun to reminisce.

POT:  I believe you are right on in remembering how our parents interpreted things for us.  Now that you mention it...I do remember Walter Cronkite's 20th Century. We also watched "Meet the Press"  I truly believe that the Holocaust is such a "mind blowing" event for our parents and the following generation that regardless of what carries on today has no comparison regardless of what media states.  That would be especially true if you added in the atrocities committed by both the Russians and Germans on the Eastern Front.

 

The Polish immigrants would have had much to say (most likely in a taciturn manner) about their lives and the blessings of leaving a post-war Poland that was nothing but dust and ashes in some parts.  It's terribly difficult to comprehend what a horrible time the Poles had regardless of their religious background being treated like a shuttlecock between the Soviets and the Germans.

 

Our favourite home Sunday TV viewing event was the WWII series VICTORY AT SEA...I believe this was because my father was in the RAF and so removed from the Naval battles that it gave him a different perspective on the war.  And the music was just absolutely fabulous.  Richard Rogers scored the series and it added so much to the documentary.

 

I believe my family was a cross between "Life with Riley" and "The Goldbergs" (50's version).  

 

Nice dialogue POT. 

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I so identify with many of your experiences, Emily. 

 

Tell me, from which country did your parents immigrant?

Dargo:  Great Britain, my dad and his Mom from Scotland after WWI and my Mom from England as a war bride.  She dated only English military (she was quite snobby about Yanks apparently) and was in for quite a shock when she met my Dad and discovered he was a "YANK", in the RCAF.  She rationalized that he was never truly a Yank thus it was OK.  She never said so but and this is only supposition on my part. 

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Dargo:  Great Britain, my dad and his Mom from Scotland after WWI and my Mom from England as a war bride.  She dated only English military (she was quite snobby about Yanks apparently) and was in for quite a shock when she met my Dad and discovered he was a "YANK", in the RCAF.  She rationalized that he was never truly a Yank thus it was OK.  She never said so but and this is only supposition on my part. 

 

Oh, yeah. So THIS explains all those superfluous-U's I see in all your posts around here, eh Emily?! ;)

 

So "Mum" was one of those Brits who would voice that oft-heard lament about those bloomin' Yanks: "They're overpaid, oversexed, and over here", RIGHT?! 

 

And Father was one of those "Yanks in the RCAF", ya say? So, did he happen to resemble at all that pretty boy Tyrone Power who played a part similar to that in that 1941 flick, A YANK IN THE RAF?

 

(...'cause if he did, then I suppose I can see how he won over your mother...some women REALLY go for those pretty boy types, ya know) ;)

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I grew up in NJ where you were not allowed to

pump your own gas. As far as I know, you still can't.

 

You cannot pump your own gas in Oregon either.

 

I remember when my husband and I went to California on our honeymoon.  We pulled into a gas station and sat there for awhile before we realized, "oh yeah, you have to pump your own gas here." 

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You cannot pump your own gas in Oregon either.

 

I remember when my husband and I went to California on our honeymoon.  We pulled into a gas station and sat there for awhile before we realized, "oh yeah, you have to pump your own gas here." 

 

Betcha they make an exception for motorcyclists up there, don't they speedy?!

 

'Cause I know I wouldn't trust ANYBODY else, let alone any gas jockey, to put gas in any of my Triumphs!

 

(...they'd get even ONE drop o' gas on my tank's paint job and they'd sure hear about it!)

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Betcha they make an exception for motorcyclists up there, don't they speedy?!

 

(...'cause I know I wouldn't trust ANYBODY else, let alone any gas jockey, to put gas in any of my Triumphs!)

Lol.  I'm not sure! 

 

What's funny is when someone gets tired of waiting and starts helping themselves.  The gas attendants come out real quick when that happens.

 

This is kind of dorky and slightly off topic (as it wasn't the 50s, it was the 00s), in high school my now-husband worked at a gas station on a busy corner in Salem, OR.  I used to drive by and see if he was working.  If he was, I would just happen to need gas and would stop at his station.  I was always irritated when another attendant would get to me first.  No! I need James to help me! 

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Lol.  I'm not sure! 

 

What's funny is when someone gets tired of waiting and starts helping themselves.  The gas attendants come out real quick when that happens.

 

This is kind of dorky and slightly off topic (as it wasn't the 50s, it was the 00s), in high school my now-husband worked at a gas station on a busy corner in Salem, OR.  I used to drive by and see if he was working.  If he was, I would just happen to need gas and would stop at his station.  I was always irritated when another attendant would get to me first.  No! I need James to help me! 

 

Oh, you women are sometimes SO damn slick!

 

(...ya know, if a GUY did that sort'a thing, now days he could be accused of "stalking"!!!) ;)

 

LOL

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Oh, you women are sometimes SO damn slick!

 

(...ya know, if a GUY did that sort'a thing, now days he could be accused of "stalking"!!!) ;)

 

LOL

 

I used to also hang out in the halls after school to see if he needed a ride home (I had a car, he didn't)--much to the chagrin of his on/off (more off than on) girlfriend at the time.

 

I'm such a creeper.  Lol. 

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I used to also hang out in the halls after school to see if he needed a ride home (I had a car, he didn't)--much to the chagrin of his on/off (more off than on) girlfriend at the time.

 

I'm such a creeper.  Lol. 

 

Well, just knowing you around here after all this time, I gotta say your husband is one lucky young man to have been "caught" by such a personable, interesting and knowledgeable young lady!

 

And you can take THAT to the bank!

 

(...or I guess the gas station if you're so inclined) ;)

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Dargo said: put gas in any of my Triumphs!

 

My favorite motorcycle. Smooth & quiet well built machine. I bet you look great riding one with your silver hair flowing & big smile (sans bugs in your teeth)

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Oh, yeah. So THIS explains all those superfluous-U's I see in all your posts around here, eh Emily?! ;)

 

So "Mum" was one of those Brits who would voice that oft-heard lament about those bloomin' Yanks: "They're overpaid, oversexed, and over here", RIGHT?! 

 

And Father was one of those "Yanks in the RCAF", ya say? So, did he happen to resemble at all that pretty boy Tyrone Power who played a part similar to that in that 1941 flick, A YANK IN THE RAF?

 

(...'cause if he did, then I suppose I can see how he won over your mother...some women REALLY go for those pretty boy types, ya know) ;)

Yes...our parents were very "British" at home and I often lived in two worlds.  If I spelled with a "u" in school I was marked off and my parents couldn't understand why.  They gave up convincing teachers and just stated that when writing to relatives we were to use "u"...so it has stayed with me for most of my life.   My Dad didn't resemble Tyrone Power but he was a great bomber pilot and flew his 30 missions and brought his crew safely home every time and completed his flying tour in 1943.  I don't know how my mother really felt about Yanks in general, she loved my Dad but I don't believe she ever equated him as being a Yank.

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I think this posting is about what we personally experienced in the 50's for those of us lucky enough to live then.  I know about social issues but I really thought this was a post to share our experiences and memories. 

 

And just as an aside to the social issues, remember many of us going to school in the 50's went through the Brown vs. Board of Education experience so we weren't exactly encased in "Leave it to Beaver" plastic wrap. 

Growing up white in the Deep South, we had a different perspective.  Just as those growing up black did.  Won't go into either though.

 

We watched Father Knows Best, Leave it to Beaver, etc,. but purely for entertainment value since they in no way reflected our working/middle class lifestyles.  Our favorites were the Westerns, PI and other action shows.  Ironically I now watch FKB and LITB frequently.

 

As for refreshments, RC Cola and a MoonPie was "meal" of choice for lots of kids.  Although Pepsi was often the preferred soft drink.   One thing from back then was that many towns had local bottling companies which were independent of the majors.  Lived in a town with a population of about 10,000 and we had a Canada Dry plant and a Coca-Cola plant.  Both also did other brands, such as Nehi, etc.  The Coke plant also made a ginger ale (Woodcock's) that really burned compared to Canada Dry. 

 

Also remember driving cross-country from S.C. to Louisiana.  States had different size bottles and you couldn't leave a SC Coke bottle in AL or MS in exchange for one of theirs.

 

Back in the 50's - early 70's, pumping your own gas was a privilege extended by the station owner.  It showed you were one of the "in crowd" if they let you do it.

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Dargo said: put gas in any of my Triumphs!

 

My favorite motorcycle. Smooth & quiet well built machine. I bet you look great riding one with your silver hair flowing & big smile (sans bugs in your teeth)

 

Well Tiki, of course it goes without saying of what a dashing figure I cut while astride my choice of British-built motorcycle. ;)

 

However,  you won't ever see that silver hair of mine flowing in the breeze,  'cause I always ride while wearing a helmet. Ya see, one o' them there "brain buckets" back in '95 would save this here head o' mine from some serious damage and after some kid in his car pulled out right in front of me from a store parking lot and as I was riding my then recently purchased new Triumph.

 

I was on my way to work at LAX at the time, and I remember after flying through the air and over the hood of his car, that asphalt coming up to meet my noggin and it bouncing a few times during the process.

 

I know without it on I MIGHT not still be with us, and I DEFINITELY wouldn't be NEARLY as good lookin' as I still am for the old silver-haired f-art that I am! ;)

 

(...and this is why whenever I see all these riders around here in the no helmet law state of Arizona choosing to ride around on their Harleys without one, well, lets just say I don't think they're makin' a very smart choice in the matter...but then of course, they also choose to ride Harleys, and so I guess that would be par for the course, huh!)

 

LOL

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In MY '50's part of my childhood( being born in 1951 I'd have to say my growing up was split between two decades)----I recall things like:

 

Watching the OIL truck going down the street oiling the yet unpaved roadway...

 

...Chasing after the GOOD HUMOR truck yelling, "STOP!"  ( there was also another ice cream vendor we used to call "The Old Timer" who was it turned out, an old Ford Motor Co. employee who bought an old Good Humor truck, painted over the name.  He looked a lot like BURT MUSTIN, which is probably why I've always liked Burt.)

 

...On TV, we watched an old guy named YOUNG who knew best....

 

...and an old lady who was a DECEMBER BRIDE.

 

...A guy named John who was a BACHELOR FATHER.

 

...Saturday cartoons were either BUGS BUNNY or CRUSADER RABBIT.

 

...A kid with a funnel for a hat who was just TERRIFIC!

 

...FELIX THE CAT and his magic "bag of tricks" was always bothered by the Professor and Rock Bottom.

 

...Some kid in a cowboy outfit and a caveman had outer space adventures.(can't remember the name of THAT cartoon)

 

...Also on TV, we watched AMOS 'N' ANDY and never thought of them as anything other than FUNNY.

 

..."Smiling" Jack Smith would always remind us that we "Asked For It".

 

...EDWARD R. MURROW would take us into famous people's homes.

 

... CONELRAD reminders were as frequent on TV as commercials were.  And radios in the day were sold that had special CONELRAD symbols on the tuning dial to indicate where to tune in for emergency broadacasting.

 

...Quite often, there was a commercial of sorts that had footage of NIKITA KRUSCHEV pounding a lecturn, swearing that, "We Will Bury You!"

 

...Film footage of a fighter jet would be shown during commercial breaks while a guy reciting the poem "High Flight" was voiced-over.

 

...Another one in which a kid( and voice only) who sounded "teen-aged" would ask "dad" about "Turnpike Trance".

 

... As for regular life, I remember when road repair sites were cordoned off by sawhorses and those little black kerosene ball lanterns that resembled the BOMBS that cartoonists would often draw.

 

...DAIRY QUEEN had only ONE flavor. 

 

...A&W had to share the market with LITTLE SKIPPER and DOG & SUDS.

 

...Our town had only ONE "pizza parlor" and WHITE CASTLE was the "fastest" food around.  And burger chains like CARTER'S and DALY BURGER were everywhere.( there'

s only one of each still within driving distance from me.)

 

..."pop" bottles only had a TWO CENT deposit and you needed THREE to buy a HERSHEY BAR.

 

...PEANUTS,  DICK TRACY,  BEETLE BAILEY,  MAGGIE AN JIGGS, HENRY and THE LITTLE KING ruled the funny pages.

 

My eyes are getting watery, so I'll stop now. :(

 

 

Sepiatone

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In MY '50's part of my childhood( being born in 1951 I'd have to say my growing up was split between two decades)----I recall things like:

 

...DAIRY QUEEN had only ONE flavor. 

 

...Our town had only ONE "pizza parlor" and WHITE CASTLE was the "fastest" food around. 

 

Sepiatone

Dairy Queen actually had two flavors - vanilla and vanilla with chocolate syrup on it.  Do remember when they introduced some kind of orange ice cream, but it was not real popular.

We didn't know what pizza was in my small town.  Burgers and hot dogs unless you went to a real restaurant.

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Dairy Queen actually had two flavors - vanilla and vanilla with chocolate syrup on it.  Do remember when they introduced some kind of orange ice cream, but it was not real popular.

We didn't know what pizza was in my small town.  Burgers and hot dogs unless you went to a real restaurant.

 

Yeah, well, this bland Dairy Queen stuff can't hold a candle to the deliciously rich tasting soft serve ice cream we had out in California...

 

plfosters.jpg

 

(...while I was back there a few weeks ago for a big British motorcycle rally, I made it a point to stop and get a cone, TWICE...it reminded me of how much better it tastes than that large national chain's stuff)

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Dairy Queen actually had two flavors - vanilla and vanilla with chocolate syrup on it.  Do remember when they introduced some kind of orange ice cream, but it was not real popular.

We didn't know what pizza was in my small town.  Burgers and hot dogs unless you went to a real restaurant.

Huhn.....

 

Vanilla with chocolate syrup on it ISN'T a "flavor".  They've ALWAYS it seems, sold those "dipped" cones.

 

DARG, around here we had DQ competitors that basically sold the same "soft serve" glop.  TASTY FREEZE was one.  They were actually the first in these parts to offer both vanilla AND chocolate, but mostly sold BOTH together in a "twist". 

 

'Round here, a still popular place to go is BOB & JO'S which since 1947 sold what's called "frozen custard".  STILL at the same location, and STILL the SAME BUILDING!  On the "WYANDOTTE SIDE" of Fort St. (a local might know what that means).

 

 

Sepiatone

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Huhn.....

 

Vanilla with chocolate syrup on it ISN'T a "flavor".  They've ALWAYS it seems, sold those "dipped" cones.

 

DARG, around here we had DQ competitors that basically sold the same "soft serve" glop.  TASTY FREEZE was one.  They were actually the first in these parts to offer both vanilla AND chocolate, but mostly sold BOTH together in a "twist". 

 

'Round here, a still popular place to go is BOB & JO'S which since 1947 sold what's called "frozen custard".  STILL at the same location, and STILL the SAME BUILDING!  On the "WYANDOTTE SIDE" of Fort St. (a local might know what that means).

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Yeah, Foster's Freeze is more like a frozen custard.

 

I probably got hooked of 'em as a kid and when after my mother would take me to my pediatric dentist for those six month checkups, we'd stop on the way home at one of their nearby stands and get a couple of their cones.

 

(...good memories)

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You cannot pump your own gas in Oregon either.

 

I remember when my husband and I went to California on our honeymoon.  We pulled into a gas station and sat there for awhile before we realized, "oh yeah, you have to pump your own gas here." 

I think those are the only two states where attendants are mandatory.

Weird. I didn't think too much of it  growing up, but when I made a visit

back it was strange. C'mon buddy, I'm in a hurry. They used to clean

your windshield too. I doubt they do that anymore.

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Dairy Queen had very tasty hamburgers. I used to stop at a

convenience store almost every day on the walk home from

school and buy a Yoo-Hoo and sometimes a candy bar. It

was the start of a beautiful friendship.

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Dairy Queen had very tasty hamburgers. I used to stop at a

convenience store almost every day on the walk home from

school and buy a Yoo-Hoo and sometimes a candy bar. It

was the start of a beautiful friendship.

 

But just to be clear here Vaurtin, you never would join any Free French garrison somewhere along the line, right?!

 

(...BUT, lemme guess here...you WOULD occasionally say, "Here's lookin' at Yoo-Hoo, kid", just before takin' a swig of that chocolate-flavored beverage)

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But just to be clear here Vaurtin, you never would join any Free French garrison somewhere along the line, right?!

 

(...BUT, lemme guess here, you WOULD occasionally say, "Here's lookin' at Yoo-Hoo, kid", just before takin' a swig of that chocolate-flavored beverage)

As the Mankman might say 'insert French military joke here.'

If there was a Free French garrison, it would have been

way out of my route home. You know how to drink Yoo-Hoo,

don't you? Just open your lips and swallow. That came out

sounding dirtier than I intended. :(

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