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The cockamamie thread


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From the dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins:

 

"cockamamie is the child's version of "decalcomania," dye transfers that youngsters used to put on their hands and arms. Since they were cheap, they soon wore off. So, cockamamie first meant anything trifling or second-rate, and later came to mean silly or laughable."

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So, what's everyone else's favorite "period word"?

"Gadzooks" (I like real period movies)!

Second favorite: "fie!"

 

Well, CineSage, if we're going to go back to the eighteenth century or further, I'd have to say my favorite oath would be:

 

"Damn your eyes!"

 

I believe that this has to be said while flourishing a cape and twirling a sword at your enemy, played, if you're lucky, by Basil Rathbone, George Sanders or, in a pinch, Lionel Atwill or Laird Cregar, (on their trimmer, and more vigorous days). Or, if you're really lucky, Maureen O'Hara. Of course, you'd hear from the boys in the production code office about that d**n!

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A year or so ago I used the phrase "dammit to hell" at work, and a co-worker, about my age (mid 40s) said she hadn't heard anyone say that since her dad. I got it from Matthau. (I think he said it in "A New Leaf.")

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I didn't see any mention of "say". Saay...what's wrong wit youse?

 

Heard this one yesterday. From "A Bullet For Joey". Tough dame Joyce (Audrey Totter) is writing a note in her bedroom. Equally tough mug Joe (George Raft) enters her bedroom and walks up behind Joyce. Without turning around to see who is behind her, Joyce says, "something wrong with your knuckles?" Joe balls his right hand into a fist and grabs his fist with his left hand. He twists his fist a couple of times, looks down at the top of his fist and says, "uhh, no...". Joyce replies, "then go back out and use them on the door."

 

Rusty

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Incorrigible is one you don't hear. It seems to be associated with the 1920s, as a descriptor used by a girl of an overly flirtatious young man. I haven't read any Fitzgerald in a while, so I don't know if it was really used often then or if later writers applied it when writing about the 20s.

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:)

 

mrsl, you have to hear it as voiced by Mel Blanc for Bugs though. It takes on a special life all its own. You mean you haven't seen the Red Riding Hood Bugs Bunny!!?? Oh, speaking of inflection and woids........it's a must see.

 

On a talking head cable show last week was the guy who does, among other voices, both Ren and Stimpy. He also does (as do other guys, it's no longer a one-man voice) Bugs in commercials and movies. He's not bad, but he's no Mel Blanc.

 

It was great fun to see the people behind the voices -- I didn't know the kid in King Of The Hill was a woman.

 

Gremlins! That's another Bugs you have to see, mrsl.

 

Ah, what fun it was growing up in the 1950s......

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Dolores:

 

Well, I've always been wierd - I'm one of the few 'kids' who never liked cartoons. When I was little, I rarely watched TV. I had a stack of little 78 RPM records (the size of 45's but with a little hole), and a record player, and I sat for hours listening to songs like "Oh Where have you been Billy boy, Billy Boy", while I colored in my favorite Elizabeth Taylor, and June Allyson coloring books. It was a struggle for me to accept that my own kids loved cartoons, when the only ones I had liked were the Disney cartoon movies.

 

Anne

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> "stoney:

 

You used 'what a maroon' the other day and I couldn't figure out what you meant! You're always doing that to me.

 

Anne"

 

Must've been the day for it, Anne; I used it, too, without even thinking about it, over on the "Welcome to Cinema College" thread.

Guess a lot of us got Bugged-out" as kids!

 

Klondike

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Hey, Moira!

 

On the subject of correct period use for "Damn your eyes!":

 

If memory serves, Anthony Hopkins uses that exact epithet, or one very similar, when he dresses down his eldest son (Aidan Quinn) for disparaging the middle Ludlow brother (Brad Pitt) in absentia, in "Legends of the Fall" (a film which would earn a rare "modern classic" distinction from me).

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Guess a lot of us got Bugged-out" as kids!

 

Guilty as charged!

 

In addition to getting just about all (okay, all) my classical music appreciation from Bugs -- who can forget Elmer as conductor or the Strauss waltz with the swan and duckling (remember when the shadow banged into the rock?) -- I first heard the song 'wrong, would it be wrong to love?' not from Now Voyager, but from Bugs, singing it at the bottom of the ocean dressed as a mermaid to deflect Elmer Fudd from hunting him! Bizarre? Oh yes.

 

I think I heard the lyrics 'Hut Sut Rawlson on the Rillarah and the Bralla Bralla Suet' on Bugs for the first time, and I know 'The Five O'Clock Whistle' is from the Red Riding Hood Bugs cartoon.

 

And Seinfeld included the 'Overture' song in one of his episodes, so we who refuse to grow up are not alone. :)

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On the subject of correct period use for "Damn your eyes!":

 

If memory serves, Anthony Hopkins uses that exact epithet, or one very similar, when he dresses down his eldest son (Aidan Quinn) for disparaging the middle Ludlow brother (Brad Pitt) in absentia, in "Legends of the Fall" (a film which would earn a rare "modern classic" distinction from me).

 

Dr. Frederick Frankenstein (Gene Wilder): Damn your eyes!

 

Igor (Marty Feldman): Too late!

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"What a Maroon" I think, and I stand to be corrected, could be attributed to none other than Bugs Bunny in referring to Elmer Fudd! And hence the "R K Maroon" Company in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit." It's simply a takeoff on the word "moron!"

Hope this helps!

 

Hollis

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