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Warren Is Back - - Rules Don't Apply


Princess of Tap
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God's gift to Hollywood actresses and Discerning moviegoers everywhere is finally back.

 

Shirley MacLaine's little brother is starring, directing, writing and producing a movie again-- Rules Don't Apply. It's about Studio Life at RKO near the end of the Golden Era in the 50's, when movie mogul Howard Hughes ran it all.

 

Of course, Warren is playing Howard Hughes.

 

Who better to make a movie about Hollywood than Warren, who was the recipient of the Irving G. Thalberg Award-- the most prestigious award bestowed by the Academy.

 

Warren has been nominated for the Oscar 14 times. He won once for directing the movie Reds.

 

Let's see if the public likes his latest movie, Rules Don't Apply, which opens November 23rd.

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Of course, Warren is playing Howard Hughes.

 

Yes, as long as Beatty can't follow his real-life political ambitions (which he all got out of his system in "Bulworth", or at least as a rehearsal), he'll pretty much stick to just playing "himself" as unstoppably ambitious and looney-impulsive dreamer-negotiator characters who want to change the world personally, and who make a mess of it.

Which is pretty much why he took the role as "Bugsy".

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Looks to be interesting.  I've never had any dislike on any level of Warren, and enjoyed many of the movies he did.  Funny, the only one I REALLY didn't like was the one most people really LOVED.

 

SHAMPOO.

 

But, to each his own.

 

Sepiatone

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Sepitatone, good going by I already-(only somewhat) wrote about this upcoming Hollywoods Golden Anniversary fan by *Beatty

 

Don't see it at as big *Oscar contender though, but as few

 

 

Will see if November (23rd)

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I just saw the trailer and it looks like a typical big budget film for Warren, having fun with a Hollywood icon. Of course he found a role for his actress wife Annette Benning and 3 veteran actor friends-- the great Marty Sheen, Broadway's Matthew Broderick and the ubiquitous Alec Baldwin.

 

At 2 & a half hours, Rules Don't Apply is longer than average, but nowhere near as long as we had to sit through with Reds, which was, 3 hours and 25 minutes.

 

I think Warren's best film was Bonnie and Clyde at just over 90 minutes.

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I am a huge Warren Beatty fan, and it's like a dream come true to me that he has emerged from retirement after 15 years to put on his multiple hats and give us another film. I was quite sure that would never happen. I will definitely go see this. I fear it's going to get lost in the awards season shuffle. It doesn't seem to have any of the buzz of Moonlight or Manchester by the Sea or Nocturnal Animals, probably because it appears to be much lighter in tone than those heavy, heavy dramas. It's probably not realistic to expect it to do much box office in this multiplex and superhero world. I hope it catches on with the art house crowd and does as well as say something like Hell or High Water or one of Woody Allen's more successful films and maybe inspire Mr. Beatty to give us at least one more film.

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I sorta feel like I should start a new thread for this, if I want anybody to read it (though that's no guarantee, either ), but okay, anyone who has any interest in Mr. Beatty or his career should definitely check out the issue of Entertainment Weekly that's on the stand right now (the one with the DC TV superheroes on the cover). It features a career-spanning interview with Beatty, who sits down for interviews about as often recently as he puts out movies! Also fascinating commentary from many of his movie co-stars over the years, including Gene Hackman, Dyan Cannon, Diane Keaton, Charles Grodin, Carol Kane and Lee Grant. Among many fascinating insights: Beatty recounts a White House screening of Reds for Ronald Reagan (!), bristles at the implication he was a lothario (all of his relationships with various famous actresses lasted at least two years each, he points out), asserts one day Ishtar will be rediscovered as a highly entertaining film and bemoans how a film can't remain in the theaters long enough for people to slowly discover it anymore. Great stuff!

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I sorta feel like I should start a new thread for this, if I want anybody to read it (though that's no guarantee, either ), but okay, anyone who has any interest in Mr. Beatty or his career should definitely check out the issue of Entertainment Weekly that's on the stand right now (the one with the DC TV superheroes on the cover). It features a career-spanning interview with Beatty, who sits down for interviews about as often recently as he puts out movies! Also fascinating commentary from many of his movie co-stars over the years, including Gene Hackman, Dyan Cannon, Diane Keaton, Charles Grodin, Carol Kane and Lee Grant. Among many fascinating insights: Beatty recounts a White House screening of Reds for Ronald Reagan (!), bristles at the implication he was a lothario (all of his relationships with various famous actresses lasted at least two years each, he points out), asserts one day Ishtar will be rediscovered as a highly entertaining film and bemoans how a film can't remain in the theaters long enough for people to slowly discover it anymore. Great stuff!

Sew--

 

Please write about anything you want to say About Warren.

 

I've been a fan of Warren's since Splendor in the Grass. It's special for me because the screenplay was written by the great Kansas Pulitzer prize-winning playwright William Inge. His work depicts real Kansas people and yet at the same time it has universal themes. William Inge won the Oscar for that screenplay. He actually appears in one scene as the minister at the door of the church.

 

But I have to say that I was really amazed with Bonnie and Clyde-- Warren kicked around that movie for a long time before he could sell it. As you well know, they called it Warren's gangster movie; they called it a white elephant-- but boy, we're the wrong.

 

We've been getting promos for Rules Don't Apply for about a week now and I think it's opening in major theaters.

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Early buzz is good on his comedy-drama & though premature, who  knows he could even earn his first *Oscar nom in the supporting race?

 

Art-Direction, Costumes, already seem a lock

 

 

(P>s> WILL ALL KEEP{ EYES OUR FOR ANYTHING ON *SCORSESE'S EPIC  "SILENCE")

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I just saw the trailer and it looks like a typical big budget film for Warren, having fun with a Hollywood icon. Of course he found a role for his actress wife Annette Benning and 3 veteran actor friends-- the great Marty Sheen, Broadway's Matthew Broderick and the ubiquitous Alec Baldwin.

 

At 2 & a half hours, Rules Don't Apply is longer than average, but nowhere near as long as we had to sit through with Reds, which was, 3 hours and 25 minutes.

 

I think Warren's best film was Bonnie and Clyde at just over 90 minutes.

Princess of Tap, how much have you been able to see of this one by & *Beatty-(I musta' caught the trailer 10 times)

 

& Mr. 0sborne said he was never a fan of *Beatty's, bue to him seeming like the type of guys in school that would be mean & pick on him

 

 

(NOTE: I didn't get to see his Mulholland place, when on the 5 & 1/2hr bus tour of many Hollywood locations. Apparently, his area is closed off to the public, unlike where buddy *Nicholson lives & *Brando just had

 

I'm pretty certain though he filmed the beginning sequences from 1978's wondrous "Heaven Can wait" around there though)

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God's gift to Hollywood actresses and Discerning moviegoers everywhere is finally back.

 

Shirley MacLaine's little brother is starring, directing, writing and producing a movie again-- Rules Don't Apply. It's about Studio Life at RKO near the end of the Golden Era in the 50's, when movie mogul Howard Hughes ran it all.

 

Of course, Warren is playing Howard Hughes.

 

Who better to make a movie about Hollywood than Warren, who was the recipient of the Irving G. Thalberg Award-- the most prestigious award bestowed by the Academy.

 

Warren has been nominated for the Oscar 14 times. He won once for directing the movie Reds.

 

Let's see if the public likes his latest movie, Rules Don't Apply, which opens November 23rd.

& hopefully better then *"The Woodman" early summer release "Café, Society" ($10m.) (**1/2)

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  • 2 weeks later...

At the other end of the spectrum, Warren Beatty's Rules Don't Apply bombed with a five-day gross of $2.2 million from 2,382 theaters, one of the worst starts ever for a title going out in more than 2,000 theaters. New Regency backed the $27 million film, which is distributed by Fox.

Rules Don't Apply is Beatty's ode to old Hollywood and tells the story of a young woman (Lily Collins) and man (Alden Ehrenreich) who work for Howard Hughes.

 

The deep supporting cast features any number of wonderful actors in mostly very limited roles; among the more prominent are Matthew Broderick as a top flunky, Alec Baldwin as Bob Maheu and Martin Sheen as Noah Dietrich.

To be sure, the film is beautifully decked out to evoke a very specific time and place according to Beatty's memory of them. Contributing impressively are cinematographer Caleb Deschanel, production designer Jeannine Oppewall and costume designer Albert Wolsky. There were four editors and 16 producers.

 

**********************************************************************

 

4 editors and 16 producers, it must be a record. I notice Alec played Alec again, this was a bomb before it was dropped.

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five-day gross of $2.2 million from 2,382 theaters

 

So that is $923 per theater for 5 days

 

Or only $184 a day.

 

At $10 to see the movie you get 18 people a day.

 

18 people a day!

 

If it's shown three times you have 5 people watching. Could it be any worse?????

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I couldn't go opening weekend because of the holiday and family obligations, but I'm planning to go this weekend. Sorry it had a poor opening weekend only from the sense it might discourage Beatty from working anymore after he sat on the sidelines for 15 years or discourage others from backing him. Otherwise, I don't really care about a film's box office. It doesn't enter at all into my consideration about whether I'll go see a film or not. It looks like a fun movie about a specific era of Hollywood and the most eccentric studio head ever. I would think it would be right up the alley of TCM fans.

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Sorry it had a poor opening weekend only from the sense it might discourage Beatty from working anymore after he sat on the sidelines for 15 years or discourage others from backing him. Otherwise, I don't really care about a film's box office. It doesn't enter at all into my consideration about whether I'll go see a film or not. It looks like a fun movie about a specific era of Hollywood and the most eccentric studio head ever. I would think it would be right up the alley of TCM fans.

I couldn't agree with your more sewhite2000....this is the only movie I have seen advertised that I even would consider paying box office ticket price and an over priced soda drink.  Otherwise its TCM for me...along with Amazon Prime and Acorn-TV. 

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I asked my aunt and uncle about a recent film I had seen in a theater. Their response was "It'll be on Direct soon, we'll see it there"

 

Considering they have a big 60" screen with stereo sound and all the bells and whistles, they really have no reason to leave home to watch anything. Theaters are trying to get older generations to visit to watch films but, they have no reason to do so.

 

The only reason to go to a theater is the communal experience. Kids cheering, booing and all that. That's the one thing that only a theater can give. That's why there are so many really good dramas on netflix and such. Also why TCM had to go that route. 

 

And no $7 popcorn at home either.  :o 

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Rules Don't Apply is Beatty's ode to old Hollywood and tells the story of a young woman (Lily Collins) and man (Alden Ehrenreich) who work for Howard Hughes.

 

Which is one thing that confused audiences--IS it about Howard Hughes?  And if so, what makes it "better" than Leo Dicaprio's version?   And if it isn't about Hughes...what the heck IS it about?

And more importantly, since it was in the theater next to Moana, who cared?

 

Basically, I can't even watch Heaven Can Wait or Dick Tracy anymore without realizing how vanity and disorganized Warren Beatty is as a director.  Good visual sense of imagery, but can't tell a decent A-B story without falling back on a musical montage.

(Reds was...okay, for somebody who was clearly a Dr. Zhivago fan, but will somebody PLEASE reboot Dick Tracy with the same pop-color style and an actual director?)

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Which is one thing that confused audiences--IS it about Howard Hughes?  And if so, what makes it "better" than Leo Dicaprio's version?   And if it isn't about Hughes...what the heck IS it about?

And more importantly, since it was in the theater next to Moana, who cared?

 

Basically, I can't even watch Heaven Can Wait or Dick Tracy anymore without realizing how vanity and disorganized Warren Beatty is as a director.  Good visual sense of imagery, but can't tell a decent A-B story without falling back on a musical montage.

(Reds was...okay, for somebody who was clearly a Dr. Zhivago fan, but will somebody PLEASE reboot Dick Tracy with the same pop-color style and an actual director?)

 

Eric.

Beatty made the usual rounds in hawking this film a few weeks back(NBC's "Today" and such), and he made it a point to say that the main thrust of the story wasn't about H.H., but was about the two younger characters in it..neophytes to the Hollywood scene, and the culture shock they receive by their new surroundings being so different from their small town middle-american upbringing. 

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Oh and btw Eric...

 

The impression I got while watching Beatty hawk his movie on "Today" and just from the short clip that was shown during it, was that it was sort of an attempt to cover some of the similar ground as Richard Benjamin's MY FAVORITE YEAR, but it seemed to lack the comedic light touch of Benjamin's film.

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