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Consummating Love in the Movies


skimpole
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I want to ask about when in the movies you can see the characters really are in love with each other, and the act that proves it.  Now of course, I know that "consummating" is usually a euphemism for when the characters first have sex.  And of course, in classic Hollywood characters don't have sex on screen, or if they do it has to be deniable.

 

And further of course, there's a difference between sex and love.  To take two obvious examples in Vertigo it is heavily implied that once Scotty Ferguson has transformed Judy Barton into the Madeline Elster of his dreams, they have sex.  But far from consummating their love, Ferguson has only consummated his self-delusion, since, spoilers (but seriously?) their relationship collapses in truly spectacular fashion. 

 

Vertigo5.jpg

 

Later in Badlands, Sissy Spacek's first sexual encounter with Martin Sheen is actually disappointing.  But later in the movie near the end, we see the sublimely romantic moment of the two dancing in the dark in the headlights of their car. 

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

So this post asks two questions.  (1) What scenes in movies show that the romantic pair are truly in love with each other?  (2) Are there sex scenes which show the pairs' love (as opposed to desire) for each other?

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I'd say Yuri and Lara here seemed to be thoroughly and completely in love...

 

doctorzhivago-05.jpg

 

(...although SURE, they DO seem to have an awful lot on their minds, and for a very good reason...being caught in the midst of a revolution can weigh heavily on some people, I hear)

 

;)

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I always liked the scene in "Mildred Pierce," where Mildred and Monte go to his beach house.  They swim (Joan Crawford's two piece didn't have shoulder pads, but her cover-up robe did) come back and sit on the rug in front of the fire.  He kisses her and tells her she makes his heart pound and takes his breath away, etc.  They kiss and fall back on the rug together.  Then we see the record on the turn table come to the end and just keep scratching  there.   We know no one would tolerate that abrasive sound unless they were very, very busy.

 

Did they ever really love each other?  I think so, but at different times.  I think Mildred got over him once she saw how weak he could be, but Monte always depended on Mildred, until his very last breath.

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Later in Badlands, Sissy Spacek's first sexual encounter with Martin Sheen is actually disappointing.  But later in the movie near the end, we see the sublimely romantic moment of the two dancing in the dark in the headlights of their car. 

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

So this post asks two questions.  (1) What scenes in movies show that the romantic pair are truly in love with each other?  (2) Are there sex scenes which show the pairs' love (as opposed to desire) for each other?

on screen, or if they do it has to be deniable.

 

I am thinking of Bonnie & Clyde. She is all frisky in the early part but he insists he is no "lover boy". Later she writes and reads the poem about the two of them that gets published in a newspaper. That works like Viagra on Warren Beatty.

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In most "classic" films of the "golden era"  such consmmation of love wasn't even HINTED at except possibly if the couple were married.

 

Sepiatone

 

See the post by AndreaDoria just above yours.    In the studio-era there were lots of hints given that unmarried couples were doing more then just holding hands and kissing.     The hints are there,  one just have to be open to them.  ;)

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I mentioned this one before in a similar thread some years back, but guest progammer Mario Cantone of Sex & the City made me see Sunset Boulevard, a film I'd probably seen 10 times before, in a whole new light when he discussed with Robert Osborne the scene in which Joe Gillis returns from his New Year's Eve party upon hearing Norma Desmond has attempted suicide, and she tells him, "I'll do it again", and then they begin kissing. Cantone said, "Of course, that's the moment when they make love for the first time." I think Osborne was little taken aback by the direction the discussion of the scene took, but after a moment, he said, "I think you're right."

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I mentioned this one before in a similar thread some years back, but guest progammer Mario Cantone of Sex & the City made me see Sunset Boulevard, a film I'd probably seen 10 times before, in a whole new light when he discussed with Robert Osborne the scene in which Joe Gillis returns from his New Year's Eve party upon hearing Norma Desmond has attempted suicide, and she tells him, "I'll do it again", and then they begin kissing. Cantone said, "Of course, that's the moment when they make love for the first time." I think Osborne was little taken aback by the direction the discussion of the scene took, but after a moment, he said, "I think you're right."

 

So up until that evening Joe was able to get all those nice gifts and he only had to rub her feet?   That sounds like a bargain!  

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What about examples of true love in movies that don't actually involve sex? 

 

OH, okay. Then how about THIS one???...

 

Lady+And+The+Tramp+%252832%2529.jpg

 

I mean, a candle-lit Italian dinner and all. How romantic, EH?!

 

(...and besides, I don't recall THESE two love birds, err, canines ever gettin' it on in "that way"...I mean, this IS a Disney flick, now isn't IT?!!!)

 

LOL

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This is certainly the most romantic scene in Blue Velvet, though given the nature of the movie, that should be taken with a grain of salt:17GUIDESUB4-master1050.jpg

 

 

This scene from Solaris is one of the most romantic:

 

big_1410732549_1386609525_image.jpg

 

Though the expression on their faces shows trouble to come, which does follow shortly afterwards:

 

hqdefault.jpg

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OH, okay. Then how about THIS one???...

 

Lady+And+The+Tramp+%252832%2529.jpg

 

I mean, a candle-lit Italian dinner and all. How romantic, EH?!

 

(...and besides, I don't recall THESE two love birds, err, canines ever gettin' it on in "that way"...I mean, this IS a Disney flick, now isn't IT?!!!)

 

LOL

 

Not to mention when she calls him out for his tramping ways with Trixie, Lulu and Chiquita-what's-her-name. That was before a real "rat" invades the nursery and he gets to prove to "pidge" that he has potential as a commitment oriented male.

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One of the raunchiest flicks made during the war years (besides The Outlaw and Bambi) was released right under Mussolini's nose (although the film did run into trouble later). This was Ossessione. I think I have sat through this one three times and it gets more entertaining with each re-visit. You always have to take a shower afterward.

 

Massimo Girotti and Clara Calamai certainly gave James Garfield and Lana Turner a run for their money in the American version of The Postman Always Rings Twice. He is shirtless during roughly a third of the film and it is obvious his director Luchino Visconti is as "obsessed" with him as much as his female co-star. (Supposedly "stuff" happened behind closed doors between star and director although Girotti was pretty hetero the rest of his life.) Not to be outdone, Clara Calamai had already gained notoriety for exposing her breasts in a previous film La cena delle beffe.

 

1990109,FLfLbqJLKlaoOXt4qOGTaGAbwP2ba5ci

ossessione.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

One of my favorite romantic movies is Tess, and it helps that it's based on one of my all time favorite novels.  The failure of Angel and Tess' marriage is especially poignant and tragic to me.

 

tess22.JPG

 

Many people dislike, or strongly despise, Angel Clare, but this strikes me as unfair.  He is after all growing up in a society which is so ideologically hostile to dealing with women's sexuality that it has no problem executing her.

 

tess1979angel.jpg

 

That Angel should try to make things right, and through bad luck and fail is not only moving, but reminds us of a very important point.  There is a theme throughout literature of epiphanies, of redemption, of grace.  It's a theme of some of the greatest directors in film history.  But the emphasis of grace, we forget its reliance on damnation, on the people who aren't saved.

 

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

 

So that at the very end, however briefly, they are able to show their love for each other, is something special.  Sentimentality, according to James Joyce, is unearned emotion.  Here is one time, when the emotion is clearly earned.

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OH, okay. Then how about THIS one???...

 

I mean, a candle-lit Italian dinner and all. How romantic, EH?!

 

(...and besides, I don't recall THESE two love birds, err, canines ever gettin' it on in "that way"...I mean, this IS a Disney flick, now isn't IT?!!!)

 

Yes, but think for a moment--

Just what exactly happened between the spaghetti, the putting of paws in cement, and:

http://www.caps.media/195/5-lady-and-the-tramp/full/lady-tramp-disneyscreencaps.com-5716.jpg ?

 

And that's not meant to be a joke, considering that the next scene, Lady's two friends Jock and Trusty are wondering who's going to do the "honorable" thing and engage her, for some unspoken reason they know and we don't, and then Lady flies into tearful betrayal to hear that Tramp had other dog-flings with Trixie and Chiquita.

Which, in tasteful Disney style, is otherwise unsubtly meant to hint at just WHERE those Lady and Tramp-resembling puppies came from a few months later at the Christmas climax:

http://www.caps.media/195/5-lady-and-the-tramp/full/lady-tramp-disneyscreencaps.com-8722.jpg

(We don't have to explain it to our kids, do we?)   ;)

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True love - the love between Rock Hudson and Jane Wyman in "Magnificent Obsession" when he starts to pretend that he is somebody else - there is no sex in this movie, their love is beyond sex -

 

 

Heh!

 

I knew some idiot once that tried to fly that crap past his wife when he was caught cheating.....

 

"But BABY!  It was only SEX.  It don't MEAN nothin'.  But, OUR love is on a HIGHER plane."

 

She told him, "Well just jump yo' **** OUT that plane, ****!"    :D

 

Sepiatone

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I want to make a digression about sitcoms.  I remember in the nineties when the consummation became distinctly more explicit.  To take an example of the more discreet standard, in Wings JoeHackett and Helen Chapel become a couple in the 1990-1991 season.  But it's not made clear that they are sleeping together.  They break up in the season finale and for the next three years are just friends.  Then in the 1993-1994 finale Helen's current boyfriend (a millionaire who ironically Joe introduced to Helen while hoping to get funding for his airplane business), proposed to her.  She accepted, and later Joe came to her house and congratulated her.  Then he left and when the episode finally ended, they were clearly in bed together.  (They married at the end of the 1994-95).  By contrast, when Ross and Rachel finally get together (for the first time) in Friends there's a joke about premature **** (actually a spilled juice box), and they're found in the morning at the museum Ross works at by a class of schoolchildren.  

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I want to make a digression about sitcoms.  I remember in the nineties when the consummation became distinctly more explicit.  To take an example of the more discreet standard, in Wings JoeHackett and Helen Chapel become a couple in the 1990-1991 season.  But it's not made clear that they are sleeping together.  They break up in the season finale and for the next three years are just friends.  Then in the 1993-1994 finale Helen's current boyfriend (a millionaire who ironically Joe introduced to Helen while hoping to get funding for his airplane business), proposed to her.  She accepted, and later Joe came to her house and congratulated her.  Then he left and when the episode finally ended, they were clearly in bed together.  (They married at the end of the 1994-95).  By contrast, when Ross and Rachel finally get together (for the first time) in Friends there's a joke about premature **** (actually a spilled juice box), and they're found in the morning at the museum Ross works at by a class of schoolchildren.  

 

This "digression of sitcoms" of which you speak can probably be traced back a few years even before your above examples, skimpole.

 

When the then new Fox Television network premiered "Married With Children" in 1987 it seemed, well to put it gingerly.."all bets were off".

 

In fact, one of the very reasons it stayed on TV for as long as it did was because of a boycott instituted against it and led by a man in Michigan who's sensibilities had been offended.

 

Yep, but all his boycott did was pique the interest of many others out there not familiar with this sitcom, and which subsequently would lead to higher ratings.

 

(...ironic, ain't it)

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It took time for Married with Children's sensibility to become more mainstream.  One couple I would like to see get together on TV is Ben Wheeler and Riley Perrin on Baby Daddy, an otherwise inconsequential sitcom.  Three times they tried to date but something went wrong.  Losing repeatedly due to bad luck so that your nitwit brother can finally get her with barely any effort on his part strikes me as incredibly unromantic as well as grotesquely unfair.  But some people think tallness makes one morally superior.

 

Ben-and-Riley-Baby-Daddy-image-ben-and-r

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