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TomJH

Racism in Trump's America

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Re:

Another example of over the top PC.  Base was named in 1918 and no one gave a hoot about it's name until YOU and a couple of others brought it up.

At least (according to the new about) not changing because of this nonsense.

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38 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Re:

Another example of over the top PC.  Base was named in 1918 and no one gave a hoot about it's name until YOU and a couple of others brought it up.

At least (according to the new about) not changing because of this nonsense.

Does anyone know how military bases are named in the first place?     Whatever that process is,   I don't see an issue with using that process for determine if there should be a name change.

E.g.  if the name of a military base is decided by a vote of Congress,    have a vote on if the name should be retained or change.

I fail to see why that would be a big deal ,  for either side,   in what I find to be a silly debate.   

HAM:   if a majority of members in Congress support something that means it isn't over-the-top by definition.    Instead it is the will-of-the-people. 

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1 hour ago, hamradio said:

Re:

Another example of over the top PC.  Base was named in 1918 and no one gave a hoot about it's name until YOU and a couple of others brought it up.

At least (according to the new about) not changing because of this nonsense.

Let's see,  in 1918 quite a few black citizens living in the South weren't even allowed to vote. So I don't know if they would have had a voice in any of this at all.

And all women in the United States were not even allowed to vote until 1920.

So we have some extraordinarily  significant demographic groups here who weren't even allowed to participate in democracy in 1918. So I suppose now's a good a time as any to review some of those decisions that were made in 1918.

What do you think?

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2 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Let's see,  in 1918 quite a few black citizens living in the South weren't even allowed to vote. So I don't know if they would have had a voice in any of this at all.

And all women in the United States were not even allowed to vote until 1920.

So we have some extraordinarily  significant demographic groups here who weren't even allowed to participate in democracy in 1918. So I suppose now's a good a time as any to review some of those decisions that were made in 1918.

What do you think?

Good points and similar to why I asked how these military bases were named the first place.     

With regards to any historical monument \ statue:   To me the government entity associated with the property should decide;  E.g.   if on city property,  city government decides.   If on county property,  county government decides.   If on state property,  state government decides.     If on Federal property,  Congress.

(And if on private property ALL levels of government should have little to NO say).

I would hope both Dems and Gopers would support the concept of: will of the people.   

 

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5 hours ago, jakeem said:

This is a suspicious death.

To allay the understandable fears of the public, a thorough investigation--

including an independent autopsy--

is warranted.

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On 6/14/2020 at 12:40 AM, Princess of Tap said:

 Here we go again--

According to Twitter, This is a white woman named Lisa Alexander who has been identified on Twitter as the CEO of La Face, a  vegan skin care company.

As a result of her racial harassment of this man of color--

on his own property--

she has lost some contractual business.

It would probably be a lot better for some people simply to mind their own business, especially when they don't know what they're talking about. But it is hard for some Lisas to admit that they could be wrong.

(Touch the Twitter link to watch the video. This racist encounter took place in San Francisco and you can Google/ YouTube to watch it on the local news there.)

 

1 hour ago, jakeem said:

 

d0Q4voGK_bigger.jpg
The CEO of a San Francisco-based skin care company apologized Sunday for calling police on a man who was stenciling a Black Lives Matter sign in chalk in front of his own home
 
7:29 AM · Jun 15, 2020·Sprinklr

 Well, this scenario is becoming all  too familiar.

The apology only comes after the "Karen" is exposed for what she really is.

And if you read all of these so-called apologies, there's always an excuse, somewhat of a  " it's not really entirely my fault", as well.

But the beauty of this is that once you realize there is a problem, then it can be addressed.

With video you can't deny the reality of a situation, which has been denied for far too long.

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29 minutes ago, jakeem said:

Another "proud" GOP political operative struts his stuff.

This Republican Senate aide, obviously a grown man,

is shown here

traumatising, racially harassing and threatening a 13 year-old child and her friends.

(The whole story is long and extremely unpleasant. Touch the article to read more and to look at the Facebook video.)

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4 hours ago, jakeem said:

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WATCH: Arthur Ashe Statue Defaced with ‘White Lives Matter’, Locals Scrub It & Get Confronted by Vandal as Cops, Ashe’s Nephew Show Up
 
6:15 AM · Jun 18, 2020·TweetDeck

Arthur Ashe was a world-class professional athlete in the sport of tennis and the first black man to win Wimbledon.

But Arthur Ashe was also a civil rights activist and worked in a tireless effort against apartheid in South Africa.

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5 hours ago, mr6666 said:

 

This white 60 year- old Homeland Security employee told a 15 year- old black teen that she didn't belong in this upscale gated neighborhood.

And that he was going to have her arrested.

 It turns out that the white man and the teenage girl live on the same street.

The girl lives with her grandparents, who are also black, and they have lived in this gated community longer than the white man.

 Since the run-in, the government employee has apologized to the grandfather-- who is not accepting the apology.

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So, question here...

Does one have to be a short, dumpy, balding white guy with an effeminate voice in order to "deserve" to live in that gated community?

(...somebody please get ahold of the CC&Rs and so we can get a ruling on this)

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8 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

This white 60 year- old Homeland Security employee told a 15 year- old black teen that she didn't belong in this upscale gated neighborhood.

And that he was going to have her arrested.

 It turns out that the white man and the teenage girl live on the same street.

The girl lives with her grandparents, who are also black, and they have lived in this gated community longer than the white man.

 Since the run-in, the government employee has apologized to the grandfather-- who is not accepting the apology.

The guy should probably be suspended from his job over this incident, but seeing as he works under the umbrella of a Republican administration, he'll probably get a raise.  Had the young girl involved in this incident been a boy instead, things may have escalated and turned out much worse than they actually did.  I continue to ask myself, "What is wrong with people?".

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4 hours ago, midwestan said:

The guy should probably be suspended from his job over this incident, but seeing as he works under the umbrella of a Republican administration, he'll probably get a raise.  Had the young girl involved in this incident been a boy instead, things may have escalated and turned out much worse than they actually did.  I continue to ask myself, "What is wrong with people?".

Sad to say, this has been going on for years in the United States.

The only difference now is the video taken on the cell phone and that video going viral on the internet.

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54 minutes ago, jakeem said:
 

NVnHvjJ7_bigger.jpg

JUST IN: Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced that one of the three police officers who discharged their weapons during the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor will be fired.
 
Robert Schroeder, Louisville's interim police chief, said Brett Hankinson "wantonly and blindly" fired 10 rounds into Breonna Taylor's apartment in a letter detailing Hankinson's firing.
 
12:41 PM · Jun 19, 2020·TweetDeck

All of this police lynching of black people will not stop until Justice is repeatedly served and the message gets across--

Loud & Clear --

that the police cannot indiscriminately murder black people and get away with it.

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26 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

All of this police lynching of black people will not stop until Justice is repeatedly served and the message gets across--

Loud & Clear --

that the police cannot indiscriminately murder black people and get away with it.

Violence between humans will never stop.    All that can be hoped for is that it is keep to a "reasonable" minimum.

This includes police abuse.        I know that some will gag over the use of "reasonable" but that is the reality of the human experience.

                   

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22 hours ago, mr6666 said:

 

He should be fired or allowed to take early retirement.  No way he should be working for Homeland Security.  If nothing else, as soon as he saw the phone camera come up, he should have shut up, gone inside his house and if he so desired call the gate to report an issue.  Not doing so shows he is unfit to work for Homeland Security.

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History of 'Juneteenth' -

"Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.  Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation - which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

Later attempts to explain this two and a half year delay in the receipt of this important news have yielded several versions that have been handed down through the years..........

........The reactions to this profound news ranged from pure shock to immediate jubilation. While many lingered to learn of this new employer to employee relationship, many left before these offers were completely off the lips of their former 'masters' - attesting to the varying conditions on the plantations and the realization of freedom. Even with nowhere to go, many felt that leaving the plantation would be their first grasp of freedom. North was a logical destination and for many it represented true freedom, while the desire to reach family members in neighboring states drove some into Louisiana, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Settling into these new areas as free men and women brought on new realities and the challenges of establishing a heretofore non-existent status for black people in America. ........

https://www.juneteenth.com/history.htm

:)

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I had too look up why Black History Month is in February.    It appears the only reason is that is the month when black students at Kent State University pushed for such a month.  6 years later President Ford made the month more official during the U.S. Bicentennial.   

June looks like a more suitable month for the celebration of black history in the Americas.  

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17 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I had too look up why Black History Month is in February.    It appears the only reason is that is the month when black students at Kent State University pushed for such a month.  6 years later President Ford made the month more official during the U.S. Bicentennial.   

June looks like a more suitable month for the celebration of black history in the Americas.  

Why?  Slavery still existed in MD and other states not effected by the Emancipation Proclamation.  Dec. 6, 1865 is the date the 13th Amendment was ratified by Alabama and abolished slavery everywhere.  "Juneteenth" only freed those slaves in the Galveston, TX area.

The end of the Civil War did NOT abolish slavery.  

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4 hours ago, TheCid said:

Why?  Slavery still existed in MD and other states not effected by the Emancipation Proclamation.  Dec. 6, 1865 is the date the 13th Amendment was ratified by Alabama and abolished slavery everywhere.  "Juneteenth" only freed those slaves in the Galveston, TX area.

The end of the Civil War did NOT abolish slavery.  

Got that one right, was call Child Labor, which affected all races :(

schuman1-cover-image.png

childlabor8.jpg?w=600

800px-Abolish_child_slavery.jpg

 

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4 hours ago, TheCid said:

Why?  Slavery still existed in MD and other states not effected by the Emancipation Proclamation.  Dec. 6, 1865 is the date the 13th Amendment was ratified by Alabama and abolished slavery everywhere.  "Juneteenth" only freed those slaves in the Galveston, TX area.

The end of the Civil War did NOT abolish slavery.  

You have a good point;   maybe a more appropriate event to celebrate would be the 13 amendment which was passed by Congress in January and ratified in December.

 

 

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16 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

You have a good point;   maybe a more appropriate event to celebrate would be the 13 amendment which was passed by Congress in January and ratified in December.

 

 

Too many holidays in December.

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19 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Got that one right, was call Child Labor, which affected all races :(

schuman1-cover-image.png

childlabor8.jpg?w=600

800px-Abolish_child_slavery.jpg

 

Child labor, no matter how bad it was and unfair is not slavery.

In slavery, human beings were owned just like you can own a car or a dog.

Black women were raped by the white male Masters, but you couldn't legally call it rape because the black women had no legal status-- they were chattel, property.

Black slaves had no Humanity under the law. When the house, the property, the horses and cows were sold--they were sold along with it.

That reminds me of a PBS program where they trace people's roots. They were trying to find the white -great-great-grandfather of some black celebrity and they actually had gotten to the white descendant. The white descendant had access to his ancestor's Plantation papers. And they were looking for this black celebrity's ancestor by name but they couldn't find it and finally they found it--alongside of the cows and the horses.  I don't have to tell you how embarrassed that white descendant was on television. But it's one thing to talk about slavery and it's another thing  to give real examples  of what it was like  for the  black  Americans involved .

That tells you all you need to know about slavery.

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