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KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE, By Richard Thorpe


Palmerin
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What's with Mankiewicz' fixation on the competition that movies of the 1950s had with TV??? Doesn't he realize that, without television, he would be out of a job?

The battle at the beginning is all wrong. The classic centuries-old strategy is to first soften the enemy with artillery: archery and catapults=cannon, howitzers, mortars, missiles, and aviation--, and only then strike with the heavy cavalry=tanks and armored personnel carriers.

On the other hand, the broadsword is handled more accurately than in the ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD of Curtiz. That sword was no epee or saber; instead it was used like an axe to cleave the head of your opponent or to disable his arm.

Now let's have your own observations, if you please, my dears.

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So, ya wanna talk swords here, do ya Palmerin?!

 

Okay, I've got a question for ya here then.

 

Why is there a "w" in that word???

 

(...just could never figure out why)

 

;)

 

I don't know what the topic is here.   All I know is that  Mankiewicz has been out of a job for decades  (oh wait he was talking about Ben!).

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OH, and then of course when one speaks of medieval combat weapons, there's the trusty quarterstaff, and as Daffy here is demonstrating the proper use of...

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

(...well okay, in Daffy's case, he'll tell you that HIS is actually "a buck and a quarter staff"...but he doesn't want anybody to know that he overpaid for it)

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OK, so, if that's a "quarter" staff, how big is the WHOLE one?  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

 

MY guess?! On average about 10 feet in length!

 

Where do ya think that old expression about "not touching that" with a pole measuring that particular length comes from, anyway?

 

(...and don't now bother checking "ethymology.com" to see if I'm right...those guys over there make up as much of this stuff as I do, ya know) ;)

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So, ya wanna talk swords here, do ya Palmerin?!

 

Okay, I've got a question for ya here then.

 

Why is there a "w" in that word???

 

(...just could never figure out why)

 

;)

From Proto-Germanic *swerdą(literally ‘cutting, festering thing’), of uncertain origin, but most likely ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swer-(‘fester,cut’ later ‘ wound’). Cognate with Old Frisian swerd (West Frisian swurd), Old Saxon swerd (Low German Sweerd), Old Dutch swert (Dutch zwaard), Old High German swert (German Schwert), Old Norse sverð (Danish sværd, Norwegian sverd, Swedish svärd)

 

Which does not answer your question ... but hey, why is there a "w" in "answer?" Anybody "kno"?

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From Proto-Germanic *swerdą ‎(“literally ‘cutting, festering thing’”), of uncertain origin, but most likely ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swer- ‎(“‘fester,cut’ later ‘ wound’”). Cognate with Old Frisian swerd (West Frisian swurd), Old Saxon swerd (Low German Sweerd), Old Dutch swert (Dutch zwaard), Old High German swert (German Schwert), Old Norse sverð (Danish sværd, Norwegian sverd, Swedish svärd)

 

Which does not answer your question ... but hey, why is there a "w" in "answer?" Anybody "kno"?

 

Sorry, not me, Rich.

 

(...hell, as you know, I'm STILL tryin' to figure out why the Brits still spell certain words with that SINGLE superfluous "u", let ALONE all these OTHER words containing DOUBLE-"u"s that don't really need 'em)

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MY guess?! On average about 10 feet in length!

 

Where do ya think that old expression about "not touching that" with a pole measuring that particular length comes from, anyway?

 

(...and don't now bother checking "ethymology.com" to see if I'm right...those guys over there make up as much of this stuff and I do, ya know) ;)

 

"Ten foot pole"?   Always wondered about that.  All the Polish people I know rarely get that tall.  I sometimes need to stop taking things so literal .  My basement's FULL of stuff that people told me to "stick it where the sun don't shine!"  ;)

 

My garage is bursting at the seams now too.  B)

 

 

Sepiatone

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What's with Mankiewicz' fixation on the competition that movies of the 1950s had with TV??? Doesn't he realize that, without television, he would be out of a job?

The battle at the beginning is all wrong. The classic centuries-old strategy is to first soften the enemy with artillery: archery and catapults=cannon, howitzers, mortars, missiles, and aviation--, and only then strike with the heavy cavalry=tanks and armored personnel carriers.

On the other hand, the broadsword is handled more accurately than in the ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD of Curtiz. That sword was no epee or saber; instead it was used like an axe to cleave the head of your opponent or to disable his arm.

Now let's have your own observations, if you please, my dears.

what about that nifty scene from Westworld where in Medievalworld the black knight shoves a sword in the tourist's gut before even getting to have breakfast?

 

wasn't that a broadsword? :)

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what about that nifty scene from Westworld where in Medievalworld the black knight shoves a sword in the tourist's gut before even getting to have breakfast?

 

wasn't that a broadsword? :)

 

No ND. I think that was more a case of the futuristic theme park making sure they didn't run out of breakfasts for everyone. 

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