Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

The Estate of Maureen O'Hara


TomJH
 Share

Recommended Posts

TCM is much advertising these days a Bonhams auction at the end of the month of numerous items from Miss O'Hara's estate. It is being done through her family (grandson, I believe).

 

But am I the only one to cringe a little when they say that among the items to be auctioned will be love letters from John Ford, the contents of which have never been completely revealed, they say in the blurb on the channel.

 

Now I know that Ms O'Hara stated in her autobiography that she was shocked when she realized that the legendary director had a "thing" for her in their very complicated relationship, and she did quote some of his letters.

 

Still, to have the further intimacy of his feelings towards her exposed to the light of day, something the actress herself didn't do, makes me wonder how O'Hara would feel about this.

 

It will undoubtedly be of interest to some film buffs but, call me a prude, to merely know that Ford had feelings (fantasies?) about O'Hara is enough for me. I don't want to see the intimate thoughts expressed in those letters on display for the world to see, not only out of respect for the privacy of a long deceased director but for that of the recipient of those missives, as well.

 

I realize this is mild stuff in this anything goes time of revelations about show biz figures, both living and dead.

 

But, in this instance somehow I feel that letting a famous director's specific romantic feelings about a co-worker remain private (especially since she had done that) would be the decent thing to do. In the final analysis, it's apparent that making some money trumps decency.

 

John-Ford-and-Maureen-OHara-in-Ireland.j

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

TCM is much advertising these days a Bonhams auction at the end of the month of numerous items from Miss O'Hara's estate. It is being done through her family (grandson, I believe).

 

But am I the only one to cringe a little when they say that among the items to be auctioned will be love letters from John Ford, the contents of which have never been completely revealed, they say in the blurb on the channel.

 

Now I know that Ms O'Hara stated in her autobiography that she was shocked when she realized that the legendary director had a "thing" for her in their very complicated relationship, and she did quote some of his letters.

 

Still, to have the further intimacy of his feelings towards her exposed to the light of day, something the actress herself didn't do, makes me wonder how O'Hara would feel about this.

 

It will undoubtedly be of interest to some film buffs but, call me a prude, to merely know that Ford had feelings (fantasies?) about O'Hara is enough for me. I don't want to see the intimate thoughts expressed in those letters on display for the world to see, not only out of respect for the privacy of a long deceased director but for that of the recipient of those missives, as well.

 

I realize this is mild stuff in this anything goes time of revelations about show biz figures, both living and dead.

 

But, in this instance somehow I feel that letting a famous director's specific romantic feelings about a co-worker remain private (especially since she had done that) would be the decent thing to do. In the final analysis, it's apparent that making some money trumps decency.

 

 

 

I view those letter as historical documents.    I don't see the need for anything to be private as well as having anything to do with decency.

 

He wrote the letters and these letters provide interesting information about the interaction between directors and actors.  

 

The one 'issue' I see here is that maybe she didn't want those letters released AND if that if true and she told that to her heirs they should honor her request.  BUT if she really felt this way,  she should have destroyed the letters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can make the historical document analogy, which can be applied to virtually all letters throughout history between two people of renown.

 

But they were also private correspondence between two persons. Unless one of the two people involved willingly agreed to let the letters be published or, at least, seen, it's really none of our business to see the specifics of a man's declaration of his feelings for a woman, in my opinion. Let Ford have his privacy.

 

Nor is it up to O'Hara to have destroyed the letters if she didn't want them seen, as you stated, James. They may have meant something to her. Presumably she did not leave any documentation, though, indicating that they were to remain private. If she felt that way about them, it was an oversight on her part.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can make the historical document analogy, which can be applied to virtually all letters throughout history between two people of renown.

 

But they were also private correspondence between two persons. Unless one of the two people involved willingly agreed to let the letters be published or, at least, seen, it's really none of our business to see the specifics of a man's declaration of his feelings for a woman, in my opinion. Let Ford have his privacy.

 

Once one gives a letter to someone protecting the privacy of said letter falls into the hands of the receiver.   If Ford asked her to destroy those letter and she didn't that is on her (and I believe she should have honored such a request).   But if he didn't ask, she had no duty to destroy them and now they are public records.

 

Anyhow,  what harm to his FILM legacy do these letter have?     I can't fault any man for having feelings, especially sexual ones, for O'Hara.     Now if the letters were to June Allyson,  that would be something to hide. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once one gives a letter to someone protecting the privacy of said letter falls into the hands of the receiver.   If Ford asked her to destroy those letter and she didn't that is on her (and I believe she should have honored such a request).   But if he didn't ask, she had no duty to destroy them and now they are public records.

 

Anyhow,  what harm to his FILM legacy do these letter have?     I can't fault any man for having feelings, especially sexual ones, for O'Hara.     Now if the letters were to June Allyson,  that would be something to hide. 

 

Hopefully O'Hara's family is not crassly exploiting love letters for economic gain, particularly if it would have upset O'Hara. However, I just don't know that that is the case,

 

These letters have little to do with a film legacy, just a person's privacy, even if that individual has passed away. However, information of this nature is, obviously, potential gold for biographers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tsk tsk. Just no respect for the red.

 

Eeh...you know me, Tom ol' boy.

 

Anybody's "fair game", and whether they're six feet under or not.  ;)

 

(...I believe that's known as being "irreverent"...stemming from the antithetical thought of one being reverential...and ya GOTTA know by now that when it comes to all that "reverential" stuff, I ain't got much o' that stuff in reserve, doncha?!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eeh...you know me, Tom ol' boy.

 

(...anybody's "fair game", and whether they're six feet under or not) ;)

 

Keeping in mind, of course, how humour about the dead is contingent upon time.

 

"Aside from that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?"

 

Funny old joke. Probably not a big laugh getter a week or so after Abe got interrupted while watching his last play. Well, okay, maybe a few in the South would have laughed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keeping in mind, of course, how humour about the dead is contingent upon time.

 

"Aside from that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?"

 

Funny old joke. Probably not a big laugh getter a week or so after Abe got interrupted while watching his last play. Well, okay, maybe a few in the South would have laughed.

 

Dude! The great and beautiful Irish-American actress in question here died over a year ago now, RIGHT?!

 

So then tell me here...How long's the "waiting period" supposed to be in cases such as this, HUH?

 

You KNOW, as Ricky Nelson once observed(btw, he's dead too, ya know), "You can't please everyone, so ya gotta please yourself", and heck dude, there STILL are people after half a freakin' century who can't find the humo(u)r in that OTHER one about Jackie and Dallas Texas, and REGARDLESS where they might reside in this big ol' beautiful country of ours..err..mine. NOT that YOUR big country up there isn't beautiful TOO of course...but I digress.

 

(...and so, what am I supposed to do here, dude...cater to all those people out there not possessing of at least a modicum amount of an appreciation for the irreverent and/or an appreciative taste toward the absurdities of the human condition?...sorry, kind sir, I think not)

 

;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dude! The great and beautiful Irish-American actress in question here died over a year ago now, RIGHT?!

 

So then tell me here...How long's the "waiting period" supposed to be in cases such as this, HUH?

 

 

Two years, five months and nine days. Well, you asked, didn't ya? ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two years, five months and nine days. Well, you asked, didn't ya? ;)

 

Excuse me here Tom, but my calculation here of:

 

2016(the present year) minus 2015(the year that beauty died on the October 24th of it) equals one.

 

***edit to follow***

 

Ah, after re-reading your reply again Tom, I now see you were just picking some random amount of time in order to say this it is the "requisite and minimum grieving time" allotted to those of us before the irreverent jokes are to commence, huh.

 

(...I TOO can be a little slow on the ol' uptake occasionally ya know, ol' buddy...yes, a rare occurrence to be sure, but as Joe E. Brown says at the end of that Wilder flick...well, YOU know) ;) 

Edited by Dargo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see both sides of this....

 

My personal feelings are like Tom's original post, in fact I think very eloquently stated. 

 

"making some money trumps decency" these days becomes a double entendre?

 

But someone sees gold in those letters- and you know these will be published in a book in the near future for all to see.

 

Humiliating in my opinion. But "humiliating" to whom? Both people are gone, their families don't really care and heck, most likely the public doesn't really care either.

 

As an historian, personal letters don't mean much to piecing together careers - we know the facts - lurid details aren't necessary.

 

I do admire however, Jackie Kennedy's stipulation that her "personal papers" can be publicly released 100 years after her death. By that point in time, everyone that could be affected is long past dead, and so the papers will take on a purely historical aspect.

 

This also reminds me of the law firm that represented Lizzie Borden in her 1892 trial. They are still in business, obviously different people. But the lawyer's files are kept in a safe where every 50 years they are reviewed to see if the firm wants to make them public, kind of like "up for parole". So far, they've rejected any public viewing.

It remains an inconclusive "unsolved mystery" and I'll never make 2042, bah!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

...This also reminds me of the law firm that represented Lizzie Borden in her 1892 trial. They are still in business, obviously different people. But the lawyer's files are kept in a safe where every 50 years they are reviewed to see if the firm wants to make them public, kind of like "up for parole". So far, they've rejected any public viewing.

It remains an inconclusive "unsolved mystery" and I'll never make 2042, bah!

 

RATS!

 

So Tiki, does this mean I'll never be able to bid at auction for Lizzie's AX?

 

Ya know, since I watched that TV-movie starring Elizabeth Montgomery years ago, I've thought that THAT would be REALLY cool to own one day!

 

(...okay, now tell me here Tom...it IS okay to kid LIZZIE, that's Borden not Montgomery, after all these years, RIGHT?!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So Tiki, does this mean I'll never be able to bid at auction for Lizzie's AX?

 

The murder axe is in Fall River Historical Society, as is most of the artifacts from the trial, like the plaster casts of the parents' skulls.

 

This was the back of my Halloween costume this past year:

 

LBordenBackSM.jpg

 

I carried a 1 lb hatchet dipped in blood gel in that steampunk belt - that was the size of the hatchet used in the murders, it was very small.

(the black lace & spider lights hat was just for levity)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...