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It's Myrna's Month on TCM


lydecker
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So totally doing a happy dance about this. I've had enough of Natalie Wood and documentaries!!

lydecker:  Could not agree more with both statements...the only Natalie Wood movies I enjoyed were the ones she appeared in as a child and "Love with a Proper Stranger" otherwise too blah for me...some documentaries were excellent others I had absolutely no interest in...as for Myrna...who doesn't love Myrna.  She's beautiful, understated yet glamours and with William Powell...its always 5 star entertainment. 

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I'll chime in with the rest of you.  She's on my list of actresses.  Two of my favorite roles of hers are The Rains Came (1939), with Tyrone Power, and directed by Clarence Brown, and Stamboul Quest (1934) with George Brent, and directed by Sam Wood.

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 & the never even nominated actress was surprisingly & much to the chagrin of the likes of *B. Davis, *J. Crawford & the nicknamed "Queen of the MGM lot: *N. Shearer'

Was voted by over 20 million fans as "The Queen of Hollywood" in the same poll/survey that famously voted *Gable as "The King" in 1938

 

MGM held a rather tacky ceremony 1st & then there was a much bigger & classier one held at "The El Capitain"-(still there, for now on Hollywood, Blvd)

 

Somewhat pal & 3 time co-star *"The Great: Spencer Tracy" even presented him with a crown

 

She was always John Dillinger's favorite star & he snuck out to see Myrna in 1934's good (***) & *Oscar winning-(screenplay) "Manhattan Melodrama" (M-G-M) at The Biograph Theatre in Chicago-(also still there)

When he was shot down by the FBI

 

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I'll chime in with the rest of you.  She's on my list of actresses.  Two of my favorite roles of hers are The Rains Came (1939), with Tyrone Power, and directed by Clarence Brown, and Stamboul Quest (1934) with George Brent, and directed by Sam Wood.

 

Those are two of my favorite performances of hers, too.

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I never got it how some people DON'T like Myrna.   As a kid, I thought, "Gee!  What a great MOM she'd be."   And as an adult, I thought, "Jeez....but to have a WIFE like her!"

 

You can HAVE those "Bette Davis eyes".   I'll take Myrna's over Bette's ANY day!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'll chime in with the rest of you.  She's on my list of actresses.  Two of my favorite roles of hers are The Rains Came (1939), with Tyrone Power, and directed by Clarence Brown, and Stamboul Quest (1934) with George Brent, and directed by Sam Wood.

 

I like The Rains Came very much. The story and characterizations may not work so well (although George Brent is exceptionally good) but the film has wonderful set design, costumes and photography, with great special effects. This is an excellent illustration of the Hollywood studio system, through matte paintings and miniature work, producing the convincing exotic atmosphere of a foreign land that 1930s film audiences would only know through the movies. This is one great looking film.

 

I just saw Stamboul Quest about a week ago, and found this WW1 era spy romance watchable but pretty silly. But I thought Myrna was beautifully costumed and never looked more glamourous.

 

CObPiXWUcAAYYUG.jpg

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I'll chime in with the rest of you.  She's on my list of actresses.  Two of my favorite roles of hers are The Rains Came (1939), with Tyrone Power, and directed by Clarence Brown, and Stamboul Quest (1934) with George Brent, and directed by Sam Wood.

Love George Brent and the best description of him was by David Thomson in his biography book of the movies.  To summarize his observation...he had two personas: one with a moustasche and one without.

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I like The Rains Came very much. The story and characterizations may not work so well (although George Brent is exceptionally good) but the film has wonderful set design, costumes and photography, with great special effects. This is an excellent illustration of the Hollywood studio system, through matte paintings and miniature work, producing the convincing exotic atmosphere of a foreign land that 1930s film audiences would only know through the movies. This is one great looking film.

 

I just saw Stamboul Quest about a week ago, and found this WW1 era spy romance watchable but pretty silly. But I thought Myrna was beautifully costumed and never looked more glamourous.

 

CObPiXWUcAAYYUG.jpg

 

I think it may be George Brent's best performance.  As for Stamboul Quest, it's just wonderful silliness and melodrama!

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Its great to see December to be Myrna's month.  Her material from the 30's and 40's is terrific.  

 

We also get to see some really early "vamp" roles and her alongside a very young...

 

Alice White

 

Loretta Young  

 

besides the lovable pairing with William Powell.  

 

I had not seen "Show of Shows" before and it was great seeing her, circa 1930, dancing.  

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I never got it how some people DON'T like Myrna.   As a kid, I thought, "Gee!  What a great MOM she'd be."   And as an adult, I thought, "Jeez....but to have a WIFE like her!"

 

You can HAVE those "Bette Davis eyes".   I'll take Myrna's over Bette's ANY day!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

her adorable nose, too!

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I just saw Stamboul Quest about a week ago, and found this WW1 era spy romance watchable but pretty silly.

 

 

 

I like her character's power and influence, a hallmark of women's roles for the era.  The plot was also more daring than most, coming just that short of stating explicitly her job is to become Ali Bey's mistress in order to expose him.  The ending is devastating--or would be if they didn't tack on that thoroughly superfluous last scene.  But, as I've said elsewhere, just turn the movie off in time, and you'll have a fine movie.

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I think it may be George Brent's best performance.  As for Stamboul Quest, it's just wonderful silliness and melodrama!

 

I agree that The Rains Came may have George Brent's best performance. It's a shame that his character largely disappears in the film's last third or so as story emphasis swings over to Myrna and Ty (plus a lot of special effects with an earthquake and flood that may even have today's CGI generation of movie fans expressing an appreciative nod of the head in approval).

 

On the other hand, George's impulsive, often immature character frequently got on my nerves in Stamboul Quest. In contrast to him, Myrna Loy's character is so mature and in control of her emotions. (Plus she looks great).

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I like her character's power and influence, a hallmark of women's roles for the era.  The plot was also more daring than most, coming just that short of stating explicitly her job is to become Ali Bey's mistress in order to expose him.  The ending is devastating--or would be if they didn't tack on that thoroughly superfluous last scene.  But, as I've said elsewhere, just turn the movie off in time, and you'll have a fine movie.

 

Yes, yes.  You are exactly right.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I was looking at Myrna Loy's filmography on imdb. She no doubt has a large body of work to her name, but there are a few I am curious about that I have never seen anywhere -

 

So This Is Paris (1926) - I think Grapevine Video had a VHS copy of this but I can't find a copy on youtube or anywhere else. I know it survives.

 

Black Watch (1929) - John Ford's first talkie also survives.

 

Under a Texas Moon (1930) - Technicolor and survives. Apparently it has been exhibited in recent years but never on TCM to the best of my knowledge.

 

Renegades (1930) - early Fox talkie that seems to survive.

 

The Woman in Room 13 (1931) - UCLA has a nitrate print but has no plans to restore it or preserve it.

 

To Mary With Love (1936) Costars Warner Baxter and still exists, yet doesn't seem to be available anywhere.

 

Lonelyhearts (1959)

 

I'd really like to see these.

 

 

 

 

 

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