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So Why Not Kirk Douglas, TCM?


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Funny, they can manage a few Kirk films. 

 

It's not about what a channel can manage as much as it's about what a channel wants to present to its viewers. If the goal is to present Kirk Douglas films, then it seems fairly easy to do.

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Well I have read Mr. Douglas was not the nicest of guys, especially during his younger days. I mean SERIOUSLY not nice, as in physically abuse at times. Maybe that's one reason to ignore his birthday. But I'm sure that it's nothing on these boards haven't heard before.

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It's not about what a channel can manage as much as it's about what a channel wants to present to its viewers. If the goal is to present Kirk Douglas films, then it seems fairly easy to do.

Decades channel? Where do you guys find these channels? My cable system must suck, cuz I don't get it, nor do I get Fox Movie Channel. TCM is the only classic movie channel I receive.

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Decades channel? Where do you guys find these channels? My cable system must suck, cuz I don't get it, nor do I get Fox Movie Channel. TCM is the only classic movie channel I receive.

 

Fox Movie Channel is usually on a higher tier of cables packages. It's not a pay channel like HBO, but it usually isn't basic cable, either. It's not the greatest channel, as it repeats the same stuff over and over, but I guess if you haven't had the channel, you'll find a lot of stuff to watch for the first few months.

 

Decades is another one of those local station affiliates like MeTV that having been growing in number over the last few years. It's on a higher tier of my cable package, too. I have Comcast/Xfinity, btw.

 

http://www.decades.com/

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Well I have read Mr. Douglas was not the nicest of guys, especially during his younger days. I mean SERIOUSLY not nice, as in physically abuse at times. Maybe that's one reason to ignore his birthday. But I'm sure that it's nothing on these boards haven't heard before.

 

First of all, most movie buffs don't know much, if anything, about whether Douglas was or wasn't a nice guy, outside of a few vague rumours. Secondly, if the channel avoided giving film tributes to every Hollywood star about whom nasty or unpleasant things had been said we would be having significantly fewer tributes than we have had.

 

There is NO EXCUSE (Nada! Zilch! None!) for TCM having failed to acknowledge this great star's 100th birthday, especially since he is still with us to have appreciated it. Kirk Douglas should have been the December Star of the Month.

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Fox Movie Channel is usually on a higher tier of cables packages. It's not a pay channel like HBO, but it usually isn't basic cable, either. It's not the greatest channel, as it repeats the same stuff over and over, but I guess if you haven't had the channel, you'll find a lot of stuff to watch for the first few months.

 

Decades is another one of those local station affiliates like MeTV that having been growing in number over the last few years. It's on a higher tier of my cable package, too. I have Comcast/Xfinity, btw.

 

http://www.decades.com/

My cable server's "basic" package goes up to channel 197( beyond that are the HD choices) which is ANTENNA TV.  METV is 196, and DECADES is 133.

 

Last week Decades was on what they called a "Cop Show Binge" and the weekend was taken up with "77 Sunset Strip" which was fun delving into for me!  This week, it's a "Comedy Binge" and they showed some old "Laugh-In" and now it's ABBOTT AND COSTELLO.

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My cable server's "basic" package goes up to channel 197( beyond that are the HD choices) which is ANTENNA TV.  METV is 196, and DECADES is 133.

 

Last week Decades was on what they called a "Cop Show Binge" and the weekend was taken up with "77 Sunset Strip" which was fun delving into for me!  This week, it's a "Comedy Binge" and they showed some old "Laugh-In" and now it's ABBOTT AND COSTELLO.

 

Yea, I watched a lot of 77 Sunset Strip.   Like a lot of these late 50s \ early 60s shows the music is great since it features jazz combos.   A common setting in the show was Dino's  (as in Martin),  which I assume was a real place on the Strip (???).    Anyhow a jazz piano trio played there and was well featured.   

 

One episode feature Mary Tyler Moore, pre Dick Van Dyke show.    Wow did Mary look good.   She looked similar to Gene Tierney with that cute overbite but Mary had a much more full formed body.       

 

These era shows are cool since they feature many 30s - 50s 'B' stars and supporting players as well as aging 'A' stars,  and up and coming actors like Mary.      

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Yea, I watched a lot of 77 Sunset Strip.   Like a lot of these late 50s \ early 60s shows the music is great since it features jazz combos.   A common setting in the show was Dino's  (as in Martin),  which I assume was a real place on the Strip (???).    Anyhow a jazz piano trio played there and was well featured.   

 

One episode feature Mary Tyler Moore, pre Dick Van Dyke show.    Wow did Mary look good.   She looked similar to Gene Tierney with that cute overbite but Mary had a much more full formed body.       

 

These era shows are cool since they feature many 30s - 50s 'B' stars and supporting players as well as aging 'A' stars,  and up and coming actors like Mary.      

 

Yep, your assumption is correct, James. I remember seeing that large caricature of Dean Martin's face adorning the sign in front of it for many years as I'd drive through the Sunset Strip area back in the day, and until the place was razed in the mid-'80s to make way for an office building which stands there today...

 

Here's an excerpt from the supplied link to this subject posted below...

 

Dino's Lodge was a real-life Los Angeles restaurant that lasted twenty years. It is primarily remembered by fans of the television series 77 Sunset Strip. Ed Byrnes played the pseudo-hipster character Kookie, a kid working as a valet at Dino's Lodge, which was a neighbor to the private eye headquarters of the program's protagonists. When Dino's Lodge first opened it was a happening nightspot frequented by the Hollywood elite. When 77 Sunset Stripmade it famous to television viewers, it descended into a tourist trap and was abandoned by its celebrity clientele. By the early seventies, this restaurant that had once hosted parties for Frank Sinatra, was part of a cornball travel agency package that advertised a two-hundred and forty-dollar "guided tour of a motion picture studio, a full day at Disneyland and dinner at Dino's Lodge."

 

http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2011/07/dining-at-dinos-lodge.html

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First of all, most movie buffs don't know much, if anything, about whether Douglas was or wasn't a nice guy, outside of a few vague rumours. Secondly, if the channel avoided giving film tributes to every Hollywood star about whom nasty or unpleasant things had been said we would be having significantly fewer tributes than we have had.

 

There is NO EXCUSE (Nada! Zilch! None!) for TCM having failed to acknowledge this great star's 100th birthday, especially since he is still with us to have appreciated it. Kirk Douglas should have been the December Star of the Month.

Jealousy always does motivate a lot of comments that someone was not a nice guy. Unless someone bends over backwards to be nice to most people, those comments tend to come out. Especially if someone is a lousy tipper.

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Jealousy always does motivate a lot of comments that someone was not a nice guy. Unless someone bends over backwards to be nice to most people, those comments tend to come out. Especially if someone is a lousy tipper.

 

SO not true, DGF!

 

Ya see, CANADIANS have the reputation of being "lousy tippers" here in the states, and yet STILL the common thought down this way is that for the MOST part they're pretty nice folks and more polite than the norm!

 

LOL

 

(...I think I just lost whatever little respect I still have from our friends to the north around here...whaddya ya think, ol' buddy?...did I just blow it???)   ;)

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SO not true, DGF!

 

Ya see, CANADIANS have the reputation of being "lousy tippers" here in the states, and yet STILL the common thought down this way is that for the MOST part they're pretty nice folks and more polite than the norm!

 

LOL

 

(...I think I just lost whatever respect I still have from our friends to the north around here...whaddya ya think, ol' buddy?...did I just blow it???)   ;)

That's because nobody is jealous of these folks from the North, and the frigid weather they have to put up with.

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That's because nobody is jealous of these folks from the North, and the frigid weather they have to put up with.

 

Yeah...YEAH! That's always been MY theory about all this TOO!

 

;)

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For a light hearted clip of the unexpected, here are Kirk and Burt singing a duet together at the 1958 Oscars, "celebrating" the fact that neither of them had been nominated that year:

 

 

 

 

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Yep, your assumption is correct, James. I remember seeing that large caricature of Dean Martin's face adorning the sign in front of it for many years as I'd drive through the Sunset Strip area back in the day, and until the place was razed in the mid-'80s to make way for an office building which stands there today...

 

Here's an excerpt from the supplied link to this subject posted below...

 

Dino's Lodge was a real-life Los Angeles restaurant that lasted twenty years. It is primarily remembered by fans of the television series 77 Sunset Strip. Ed Byrnes played the pseudo-hipster character Kookie, a kid working as a valet at Dino's Lodge, which was a neighbor to the private eye headquarters of the program's protagonists. When Dino's Lodge first opened it was a happening nightspot frequented by the Hollywood elite. When 77 Sunset Stripmade it famous to television viewers, it descended into a tourist trap and was abandoned by its celebrity clientele. By the early seventies, this restaurant that had once hosted parties for Frank Sinatra, was part of a cornball travel agency package that advertised a two-hundred and forty-dollar "guided tour of a motion picture studio, a full day at Disneyland and dinner at Dino's Lodge."

 

http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2011/07/dining-at-dinos-lodge.html

 

Dargo--

 

You have led a Charmed Life, indeed. This Edd "Kookie" Byrnes fan salutes you!

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Neither Kirk or Burt ever sang in a film, correct?

 

Kirk starred in a musical made-for-TV version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, which I've never seen. I don't know if he sang in it or not, though the reviews I've seen of his performance were favourable.

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Yea, I watched a lot of 77 Sunset Strip.   Like a lot of these late 50s \ early 60s shows the music is great since it features jazz combos.   A common setting in the show was Dino's  (as in Martin),  which I assume was a real place on the Strip (???).    Anyhow a jazz piano trio played there and was well featured.   

 

One episode feature Mary Tyler Moore, pre Dick Van Dyke show.    Wow did Mary look good.   She looked similar to Gene Tierney with that cute overbite but Mary had a much more full formed body.       

 

These era shows are cool since they feature many 30s - 50s 'B' stars and supporting players as well as aging 'A' stars,  and up and coming actors like Mary.      

 

I mentioned that sort of thing about "77" in the "I Just Watched" thread( SERIOUSLY misnamed!) .  Missed the one with Mary though.

 

That show spurred other "private eye" type programs within a year or two of each other.  Like HAWIIAN EYE, and SURFSIDE 6.  Probably too, had the same parade of "up and comers".

 

Sepiatone  (and thanks for the "great musical ear" comment)

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Kirk starred in a musical made-for-TV version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, which I've never seen. I don't know if he sang in it or not, though the reviews I've seen of his performance were favourable.

 

Didn't Kirk also sing in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea? I haven't seen it in decades but I seem to recall him playing a concertina and singing some sea ditty.

 

No relation to P Diddy.

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Didn't Kirk also sing in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea? I haven't seen it in decades but I seem to recall him playing a concertina and singing some sea ditty.

 

No relation to P Diddy.

 

I believe he did, clore.

 

Kirk also sang (and not a bad singing voice either) while strumming a banjo in Man Without A Star, a good Universal western of 1955 that, unfortunately, is not so easy to find today, but used to come on local TV channels a lot years ago.

 

Kirk sings a ballad in a saloon, "And the Moon Grew Brighter and Brighter," doing it with his usual high energy gusto, and making it fun to watch him.

 

He plays an easy going cowboy, full of charm, doing a lot of gun tricks, if memory serves me correctly. His character, though, hates barbed wire and what it's doing to the freedom of the range. With a mean looking hombre like Richard Boone hanging around you know he's going to come into trouble sooner or later.

 

876-3.jpg

 

l-homme-qui-n-a-pas-d-etoile-man-without

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I mentioned that sort of thing about "77" in the "I Just Watched" thread( SERIOUSLY misnamed!) .  Missed the one with Mary though.

 

That show spurred other "private eye" type programs within a year or two of each other.  Like HAWIIAN EYE, and SURFSIDE 6.  Probably too, had the same parade of "up and comers".

 

Sepiatone  (and thanks for the "great musical ear" comment)

The episode I saw had Connie Stevens as a guest star (I think). She turned up as a regular on "Hawaiian Eye".

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I believe he did, clore.

 

Kirk also sang (and not a bad singing voice either) while strumming a banjo in Man Without A Star, a good Universal western of 1955 that, unfortunately, is not so easy to find today, but used to come on local TV channels a lot years ago.

 

Kirk sings a ballad in a saloon, "And the Moon Grew Brighter and Brighter," doing it with his usual high energy gusto, and making it fun to watch him.

 

He plays an easy going cowboy, full of charm, doing a lot of gun tricks, if memory serves me correctly. His character, though, hates barbed wire and what it's doing to the freedom of the range. With a mean looking hombre like Richard Boone hanging around you know he's going to come into trouble sooner or later.

 

 

So, kind of a precursor of sorts to a later of Kirk's roles in LONELY ARE THE BRAVE. I believe there's a scene in that one where he clips a barbed wire fence while muttering about this same complaint.

 

And regarding Kirk singing, I just found on YouTube another instance of him doing this(and in Spanish yet) in another seemingly little remembered film, 1961's THE LAST SUNSET...

 

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Kirk starred in a musical made-for-TV version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, which I've never seen. I don't know if he sang in it or not, though the reviews I've seen of his performance were favourable.

A musical version of DR. JEKYLL? Why not a musical version MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW (on TCM last night)?

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