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Anyone Here Not Celebrate Christmas?


TikiSoo

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Should that not be: "those losy sperflos- 's in this langage"?

 

;)

 

Nope Sans. The 'U's in those words aren't superfluous, of course.

 

And "color" me perplexed that a lady as bright as you would even ASK that question!   ;)

 

(...and btw, great find of that old Tom Lehrer song...loved it...and Merr..errr..HAPPY Christmas to you and that husband of yours, and from whom of late I must say we hear much too little)

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Haven't heard that Lehrer tune for years.  THANKS for that SANS.

 

Saw a comic in today's paper about someone trying, because the two holidays coincide this year, to cover it all by wishing EVERYone a---

 

MERRY CHRISMUKKAH!    :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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Undecorating for Christmas

Our annual battle over when to take down the decorations is about to commence.  My family left them up until New Years Day.  My wife insists everything comes down on Dec. 26.

Does have advantages, if I don't do anything she takes everything down except breaking down the artificial tree and garland over the front door (requires the big ladder).

Laziness has its rewards.  Also, scheduling to be away most of Dec. 26.

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I normally put up my Christmas stuff on December 7 and take it down on January 7.

 

In most Christmas movies shown on TCM, people don't put up their tree until December 24.  I always thought this was an odd way of decorating and celebrating the season as a kid.  Then, it dawned on me that the song "Twelve Days of Christmas" relates to December 25 as the first day of Christmas.  The 12th day is actually on January 6, which many Christians call "Epiphany", but Orthodox Christians celebrate as their Christmas Day.  In its strictest sense, the Christmas Season in the Catholic Church is the shortest one of the year.  Advent is the next shortest, followed by Lent, then Easter.  Ordinary time is the longest portion of the church calendar.

 

Merry Christmas to all the posters here...hope you have a pleasant and drama-free holiday (unless you decide to binge-watch TCM)!

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Undecorating for Christmas

Our annual battle over when to take down the decorations is about to commence.  My family left them up until New Years Day.  My wife insists everything comes down on Dec. 26.

Does have advantages, if I don't do anything she takes everything down except breaking down the artificial tree and garland over the front door (requires the big ladder).

Laziness has its rewards.  Also, scheduling to be away most of Dec. 26.

 

 

You can procrastinate a little further by expressing your desire to keep the tree up until after January 7 which is Christmas Day for Orthodox Christians.

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My family traditionally  never took down the tree until after the first of the year.  No particular reason except maybe to play out the end of the year still in the Christmas mood, and maybe too, give a little extra time for "recuperating" from the holiday. 

 

As we were never drinkers, nor "all nighter" New Year's celebratants,  We were usually in good enough condition to do the task.

 

Even after I grew up, had a family and even into my second marriage, I continued the tradition.  I told my wife it was supposed to be "bad luck" to take it down before the new year.  And as she subscribes to a lot of other weird "bad luck" superstition stuff, she went along.  ;)

 

Sepiatone

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I remember when I was a kid and still used to "celebrate" christ mass, for what ever reason at that time. I had my first apartment and on the day after x mass I rescued someones perfectly good x mas tree from a dumpster, and resurrected it in a corner of my apartment. 

I really liked the green, and piney smell... Liked it so much that I kept it way to long!

Finally had to put it to rest when the needles turned brown and began falling off all over the floor.

 

I still like to bring a little green inside wherever I am at the time.

Still enjoy the color and odor of fresh pine. Especially if I'm in some cold and distant clime.

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Undecorating for Christmas

Our annual battle over when to take down the decorations is about to commence.  My family left them up until New Years Day.  My wife insists everything comes down on Dec. 26.

Does have advantages, if I don't do anything she takes everything down except breaking down the artificial tree and garland over the front door (requires the big ladder).

Laziness has its rewards.  Also, scheduling to be away most of Dec. 26.

 

We usually leave it up till it looks like a Charlie Brown Christmas tree.

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What I find interesting is your referral to it as "Christ Mass".

 

 

Sepiatone

"Christmas" is a shortened form of "Christ's mass" or Christ Mass

 

Xmas is an abbreviation of "Christ mass" from the initial letter chi (Χ) in Greek Khrīstos (Χριστός) or "Christ."

 

This slanted cross "X" or "sign of Christ" was reportedly ordered to be visibly marked on the shields of Constantine's soldiers in 312 AE when he faced down Maxentius' greater numbers at the Milvian Bridge for the control of Rome.

 

According to the historian Lactantius, Constantine, a pagan, supposedly had a "religious" conversion experience before the battle began, after an apparition in a dream told him "to mark the heavenly sign of god on his soldiers' shields,"

The historian Eusebius reported a somewhat different version with Constantine seeing a cross, or "X" in the sky along with the message "with this sign, you will conquer" which was confirmed following night when Christ visited him in a dream.

In either event, Constantine decisively won the battle and attributed the victory to Christ.

 

As a far flung empire, Imperial Rome generally had no problem tolerating it's various religions, so long as whichever Emperor was acknowledged as at the top of the pantheon.

For a long time ancient monotheistic religions such as Judaism had been granted special exemptions for not partaking in state festivals, so long as they paid their taxes. But Christianity was considered a wild upstart cult with adherents that not only refused to follow traditional rites but held secret (and misunderstood) rites of their own, arousing suspicion and incurring much public agitation. Despite (or probably because of) it's growing popularity, Christianity was eventually banned as a secret subversive society that threatened the necessary good will of the many gods that supported Rome.  

Under the orders of Emperor Diocletian, Christians throughout the empire had been subject to their most ruthless pogrom in Roman history, referred to as the "Great Persecution".

Diocletian had divided the empire into a tetrarchy and shortly after his abdication there was an empire wide internecine civil war and scramble for power and total control, which Constantine eventually won.  

 

The office of "Pontifex maximus" (Roman high priest) or "chairman of the college of the pontifices" ('priests'), had been held by all of the Caesar's since Julius; and all of the emperors since Augustus. So Constantine assumed the role when he became emperor.

Rome was still a pagan empire with many gods and many religions, of which Christianity was only one. Whether Constantine's religious conversion was genuine or not is still a point of debate, however most scholars agree that at the very least, Constantine likely viewed Christ as the most powerful in the pantheon of all the god's, and as such his followers were worthy of benevolent consideration, or at least a return to tolerance. Steps in that direction were made with the 311 AC "Edict of Toleration" and 313 "Edict of Milan" which granted Christianity an official legal and protected status within the empire.  

 

The Roman empire had adopted many gods throughout its history, and celebrated many pagan festivals throughout the year (many brought back to Rome and "Romanized" as a byproduct of military conquest and occupation).

Then, as now, most were not only tolerated but encouraged and endorsed by the state because they promoted a peaceful release of tension and harmony, as well as being a boon to traders and marketers.

 

Among the most popular were the Saturnalia, a holiday which honored Saturn (the father of Jupiter, and other popular Romanized gods) from December 17-23 of the Julian Calendar. And the birthday of Mithra.

December 25 was the date of the winter solstice on the Roman calendar. Being the shortest day of the year it marked the rebirth of Sol Invictus (the "Unconquered Sun"). Sol Invictus was the "official" life giving sun god and patron of soldiers.

 

With the "Edict of Thessalonica" in 380 AC, Christianity became the "official" religion of the Roman empire under emperor Theodosius I, and marked the official birth of the Universal or "catholic" Church of Rome (aka The Roman Catholic Church).

All citizens of the empire were ordered to "profess the faith of the bishops of Rome and Alexandria" thereby becoming "christians" by decree (this also included the numerous pagan priests).

This opened the door for religious persecution of all non-Christians, including Jews, and later Muslims, and laid the foundation stones for the later crusades to "recapture" the "holy" land.

 

"Christianization" of the popular festivals and holidays had long been in progress throughout the empire since the time of Constantine. So merging the various religious practices and changing the name of the festival honoring the birth of Sol the "sun" god to Christ, the "son of god" made reasonable sense.

 

Because the empire was so far flung, encompassing many cultures and religions, there were many variances of "christianity" from north to south and west to east.

 

When the empire split again, and the western half fell into the dark ages in the 5th century, the eastern Byzantine empire continued to flourish for almost another 1000 years, and the Greek or Eastern Orthodox Church continued to thrive, while Irish monks set out to "re-Christianize" what they could of "dark age" Europe.

When the Byzantines fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453, Islam was introduced on a grand scale into the Balkans in the East, throughout North Africa, across the strait of Gibraltar, and into Hispania in the west. But Christianity, in its various and evolving forms continued to adapt and thrive primarily throughout both Western, Northern and Eastern Slavonic Europe, as well as in Coptic, isolated sects, in Egypt, Ethiopia, and as distant as India.

 

But when I was a child I knew nothing of this.

All I knew is that I enjoyed the week off from school, the gift giving (and especially the receiving), as well as the lights and festive ceremonial atmosphere of the holiday.

All the while being confused with the conundrum of trying to harmonize the riddle of christmas, Jesus and Santa Claus???... likewise when Easter rolled around, with the hunt for rabbit eggs and candy, while in church the emphasis seemed to be on the the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ, and while my Jewish friends tried to explain to me the meaning of Passover, as they understood it....???

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I knew all that Stephan.  I was just commenting on your using a not so common phrase.  You must be that "life of the party" I done heard about!  ;)

 

I'd ask you for the TIME, but I don't want to know all about how the WATCH WORKS!  ;)

 

Sepiatone

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Undecorating for Christmas

Our annual battle over when to take down the decorations is about to commence.  My family left them up until New Years Day.  My wife insists everything comes down on Dec. 26.

Does have advantages, if I don't do anything she takes everything down except breaking down the artificial tree and garland over the front door (requires the big ladder).

Laziness has its rewards.  Also, scheduling to be away most of Dec. 26.

Why don't people just leave them up all year, so you don't have to re-decorate next year?

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Why don't people just leave them up all year, so you don't have to re-decorate next year?

My mother always left her most beautiful Christmas cards hanging up in the entrance hallway, permanently, all year round. Some people thought it was strange, but after awhile, you just got used to it.

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Why don't people just leave them up all year, so you don't have to re-decorate next year?

My thoughts as well.  House, inside and out, looks naked when the decorations come down.

We did get everything down yesterday except the main tree and its ornaments. That comes today.

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We usually leave it up till it looks like a Charlie Brown Christmas tree.

Current one is artificial, so that may take a while.

Did try the suggestions here re: why to leave decorations up longer, but not accepted by the other party.

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Why don't people just leave them up all year, so you don't have to re-decorate next year?

 

Some leaves those cheap icicle lights up all year long.

 

I always decorate the day after Thanksgiving and unplug January 2 @ midnight.  Take everything down,  hate the trend of too early decorating -  observe one holiday at a time.

 

Christmas decorating came way too early this year. :blink:

 

halloween-tree-by-Suzie_T.jpg

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Why don't people just leave them up all year, so you don't have to re-decorate next year?

 

Although I do not celebrate Christmas, I DO have some great LED warm white string lights strung up on my porch interior all year long. Along with my light up Moravian Star light over the table, this low level indirect lighting creates a soft glow on the porch for lazy relaxing on hot summer nights.

 

I also have a string of 100 of these lights hanging from my living room ceiling. Perfect low level indirect lighting for superior movie-watching!

 

(They used to be the regular incadescent lights, but I spent inordinate amounts of time finding & replacing the ONE bulb that burnt out. No more!)

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At our house the tree went up the Sunday before Christmas as that was my Dad's only day off.  Back then they were always fresh and I loved the aroma.  They stayed up until the Sunday after Epiphany which gave them about a three week run.  Since I've moved here I've put mine up in early December but will wait until after January 6th to dismantle it.  I have an Advent wreath, a creche under the tree, another I inherited from my aunt on a table, a dozen of those snowman, cookie, animal-faced and "Father Christmas" mugs you get at the discount stores for a dollar or two and some animal figurines in bow collars and Santa hats around the place.  Yes, I'm always a little sad when they have to go back in their boxes like when I get to the end of a book I like or a favorite series.  Hey, it's only eleven months until they come out again.          

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At our house the tree went up the Sunday before Christmas as that was my Dad's only day off.  Back then they were always fresh and I loved the aroma.  They stayed up until the Sunday after Epiphany which gave them about a three week run.  Since I've moved here I've put mine up in early December but will wait until after January 6th to dismantle it.  I have an Advent wreath, a creche under the tree, another I inherited from my aunt on a table, a dozen of those snowman, cookie, animal-faced and "Father Christmas" mugs you get at the discount stores for a dollar or two and some animal figurines in bow collars and Santa hats around the place.  Yes, I'm always a little sad when they have to go back in their boxes like when I get to the end of a book I like or a favorite series.  Hey, it's only eleven months until they come out again.          

 

Only NINE months if you start decorating the same time the retail stores do.  ;)

 

Sepiatone

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Anyone can't wait to take their decorations down after the 25th?  I leave mine up until after New Years.  I turn everything off when the clock reach 12:00AM January 2nd.

My wife is a fanatic about taking them down on the 26th.  This includes garlands, luminaries, floodlights and wreaths outside as well as everything inside.

This year only thing left in place on the 27th was the tree in the living room and it was down before lunch.

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