Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Some small thing(s) about SCROOGE(1951)---


Sepiatone
 Share

Recommended Posts

Only ONE in my case, but feel free to ADD if you like.  :)

 

In the scene in which MR. JORKIN is talking to young Scrooge, he says, "You're the kind of buck they're looking for these days." he walks off whistling a little tune.  I finally nailed it down...

 

It sounds a LOT like the PHIL HARRIS tune "The Thing".  Took me a while to get there though...

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Patrick Macnee, who played the young Jacob Marley in the Christmas Past sequence, appeared with Mervyn Johns (the movie's Bob Cratchit) in a 1965 episode of TV's "The Avengers." It was a holiday-themed episode of the British spy series titled "Too Many Christmas Trees."

 

The storyline involved a bout of bad dreams afflicting Macnee's character, John Steed. Johns guest starred as a Dickensphile who turned out to be the man behind the Father Christmas mask in reality. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Only ONE in my case, but feel free to ADD if you like.  :)

 

In the scene in which MR. JORKIN is talking to young Scrooge, he says, "You're the kind of buck they're looking for these days." he walks off whistling a little tune.  I finally nailed it down...

 

It sounds a LOT like the PHIL HARRIS tune "The Thing".  Took me a while to get there though...

 

That seems a bit unlikely--The director was certainly trying to be faithful in recreating Early Victorian English Period Atmosphere, and any number of early English Victorian popular songs would sound a lot like Harris' Thing.

(I would have assumed "The Man Who Broke The Bank at Monte Carlo" would be the more obvious choice for Mr. Jorkin, but that would also be historically inaccurate.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That seems a bit unlikely--The director was certainly trying to be faithful in recreating Early Victorian English Period Atmosphere, and any number of early English Victorian popular songs would sound a lot like Harris' Thing.

(I would have assumed "The Man Who Broke The Bank at Monte Carlo" would be the more obvious choice for Mr. Jorkin, but that would also be historically inaccurate.)

 

I'm thinking possibly the script called for Mr. Jorkin to "walk off whistling a little tune" and actor JACK WARNER  absentmindedly came up with it.

 

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

By the way, that Christmas episode of "The Avengers" featured a clever in-joke. While visiting Steed at his home, Emma Peel (Diana Rigg) hands him some holiday cards from female acquaintances. One is from Steed's former investigative partner Cathy Gale, who was played by Honor Blackman.

 

Steed's response: "Mrs. Gale! Ah, how nice of her to remember me. What can she be doing in Fort Knox?"

 

patrick-macnee-honor-blackman-the-avenge

Macnee as Steed and Blackman as Mrs. Gale

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

By the way, that Christmas episode of "The Avengers" featured a clever in-joke. While visiting Steed at his home, Emma Peel (Diana Rigg) hands him some holiday cards from female acquaintances. One is from Steed's former investigative partner Cathy Gale, who was played by Honor Blackman.

 

Steed's response: "Mrs. Gale! Ah, how nice of her to remember me. What can she be doing in Fort Knox?"

 

patrick-macnee-honor-blackman-the-avenge

Macnee as Steed and Blackman as Mrs. Gale

 

 

I liked Cathy Gale better in some ways than Ms. Peel.  Gale's and Steed's relationship wasn't all roses and cheery-bye.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just noticed that the FX Movie Channel (FXM) has scheduled several showings of the Alastair Sim version of "A Christmas Carol" (released in Britain as "Scrooge"). The first is tonight at 7 Eastern Standard Time.


 


That means more opportunities to see my favorite scene from the classic movie:


 


Ebenezer Scrooge (Sim): "Spirit, are these yours?"


 


The Spirit of Christmas Present (Francis De Wolff): "They are Man's. They cling to me for protection from their fetters. This boy is Ignorance, this girl is Want. Beware them both, but most of all, beware this boy!"


 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6MFN8yiVc0


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I too, always liked that part.  How profound.  And TRUE!

 

I also like the part where in the segment with Christmas Past, the scene in which Mrs. Dilbert comes in to announce that Marley is dying and says, "I'm to tell Mr. Scrooge if he wants to take his leave of him that he should nip along smartly..."

 

Always  LOVED that phrase.

 

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOVE the bittersweet scene in which Tiny Tim (Glyn Dearman) marvels at the offerings in a toyshop window -- and momentarily becomes crestfallen when someone buys the miniature boat he wanted (but could never afford). 

 

Dearman, who grew up to become a notable producer for BBC Radio, died in 1997 at the age of 57. He was a memorable Tiny Tim.

 

a-christmas-carol-1951-window-1.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOVE the bittersweet scene in which Tiny Tim (Glyn Dearman) marvels at the offerings in a toyshop window -- and momentarily becomes crestfallen when someone buys the miniature boat he wanted (but could never afford). 

 

Dearman, who grew up to become a notable producer for BBC Radio, died in 1997 at the age of 57. He was a memorable Tiny Tim.

 

I saw this film again the other night... and yes, this toyshop scene also struck me (again).  I was really drawn in by the look on the boy's face... such natural and realistic acting.  It was beautiful.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also never get enough of a scene that proves how much Scrooge deserved his reputation as a curmudgeon. After the miser leaves his office on Christmas Eve, he is spotted by a blind beggar's seeing-eye dog. The canine immediately runs off, pulling its master away with it.

 

I wonder if Scrooge ever kicked the dog.

 

scrooge_2091779b1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also never get enough of a scene that proves how much Scrooge deserved his reputation as a curmudgeon. After the miser leaves his office on Christmas Eve, he is spotted by a blind beggar's seeing-eye dog. The canine immediately runs off, pulling its master away with it.

I don't know if it was meant to be funny, but that scene made me laugh. :) It just seemed to be a rare moment of comic relief to an otherwise serious message film.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's interesting to look at how The Ghost of Christmas Past has been portrayed in the umpteen movie and TV versions of "A Christmas Carol." 

 

Dickens described Scrooge's second unearthly vistor as a "...figure -- like a child; yet not so like a child as like an old man...Its hair, which hung about its neck and down was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it, and the tenderest bloom was on the skin. The arms were very long and muscular; the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength. Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare."

 

In the 1951 Alastair Sim version, The Ghost of Christmas Past (played by Michael J. Dolan) appears to be an elderly man.

 

still-5-1.jpg?w=1000

 

But in the 1938 MGM version starring Reginald Owen, the Ghost looks a lot like Ann Rutherford.

 

a-Edwin-L.-Marin-A-Christmas-Carol-DVD-R

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOVE the bittersweet scene in which Tiny Tim (Glyn Dearman) marvels at the offerings in a toyshop window -- and momentarily becomes crestfallen when someone buys the miniature boat he wanted (but could never afford). 

 

Dearman, who grew up to become a notable producer for BBC Radio, died in 1997 at the age of 57. He was a memorable Tiny Tim.

 

a-christmas-carol-1951-window-1.jpg

 

I always thought him the best out of all the others.  Always wondered what became of the kid, and sad to learn he died WAY too young.

 

I also, when I first saw the movie, that those toys seemed "too modern" for the time the story was supposed to take place.  Did find out later on though that they really WEREN'T out of place.

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Angela Pleasence (Donald's daughter) played The Ghost of Christmas Past in a 1984 CBS made-for-television production that starred George C. Scott as Scrooge.

 

scott-past.jpg

 

And here's what the character looked like in "A Muppet Christmas Carol" (1992), which starred Sir Michael Caine.

 

ghost-of-christmas-past-muppet-christmas

Jim Henson Productions

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Ghost of Christmas Past resembles a young girl (or is it a long-haired boy?) in the animated musical special "Mister Magoo's Christmas Carol," which originally aired on NBC in 1962.

 

11951993-mmmain.jpg

 

And here's how Joel Grey appeared in the role opposite Sir Patrick Stewart in a 1999 TV movie.

 

895b845826a133ddba7b159ae2844822.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...