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Oscars "In Memoriam" segment song suggestions


jinsinna13
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The Oscars will be here before you know it. One of my favorite parts of the show is the "In Memoriam" segment. In recent years, the producers have opted for live music during the segment instead of instrumentals playing over film clips.

 

One of my favorite pieces that was used before, and I would love to have the producers use it again, was "Ever After" composed by George Fenton.(I sometimes wish the producers would go back to the instrumentals and clips over the live music.) Here is "Ever After" playing in the background of the segment in 71st Academy Award ceremony.

 

 

 

The other song I'm suggesting is "Believe" by Josh Groban. I know it's a Christmas song, but Groban could easily sing "this day" instead of "Christmas day". It's a powerful song, and Groban has a wonderful voice. Plus, he's wonderful live, which will be important when the producers choose a performer to sing live for the "In Memoriam" segment. (Watch Groban's live performance of "O Holy Night" at the Rockefeller Center Tree lighting from a few years back if you don't believe me.)  It's also a song that hasn't been done before for the segment. I get sick of hearing "Hallelujah" and the Charlie Chaplin version of "Smile" every other year. It's time for a different song, and "Believe" is the perfect fit.

 

 

 

Those are my suggestions. Let me know if you have any other suggestions.

 

 

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Anything that does NOT allow some smarmy ham singer to steal the spotlight.

 

Yes! "Believe" could still work as an instrumental. Listen to the melody in the background of the video while Groban is singing, and you see what I mean. A tribute video I saw recently had an instrumental of "Pure Imagination", and it worked.

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Yes! "Believe" could still work as an instrumental. Listen to the melody in the background of the video while Groban is singing, and you see what I mean. A tribute video I saw recently had an instrumental of "Pure Imagination", and it worked.

 

I wish I would've thought of "Pure Imagination" earlier.

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

It doesn't really even have to be a song.  "Asa's Death" from Grieg's PEER GYNT would work, or the 2nd movement from JEAN SIBELIUS's 3rd symphony.

 

Even the 2nd movement from Beethoven's 7th symphony works for me.

 

Show tunes or syrupy movie songs would just be so cliche

 

 

Sepiatone

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"People Who Died" by THE JIM CARROLL BAND.  Not exactly a sentimental tune, but so what?  The song runs a couple of seconds under 5 minutes.  Plenty of time to display photos of the recently deceased entertainers.   

 

      At the 3:48 mark you can jack up the volume when Carroll sings "I MISS 'EM . . . THEY DIED!"

 

      (The song is from the 1980 album "CATHOLIC BOY", btw).

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  • 2 weeks later...

Did anyone watch the "In Memoriam" segment last night?

 

Sara Barellis did a good job singing "Both Sides Now", which is a song I would have NEVER picked for the segment. It's better than "Hallelujah" or the Charlie Chaplin version of "Smile" for the hundredth time, but I wish they used "Believe" instead.

 

Oscar winners George Kennedy and Patty Duke and nominees Emmanuelle Riva, John Hurt, Gene Wilder, Debbie Reynolds, and Mary Tyler Moore were included along with Carrie Fisher, Anton Yelchin, Nancy Davis Reagan, Prince, and Zsa Zsa Gabor. Everyone else included in the tribute was either an actor I've never even heard of or a behind the scenes person.

 

The biggest snub of last night's segment was Oscar nominee Robert Vaughn. Yes, you read that right. Robert Vaughn was left out despite having been an Oscar nominee for The Young Philadelphians 57 years ago. Vaughn was also in classics like The Magnificent Seven and Bullitt, which people still watch today. It also hurt not to see Gloria DeHaven and Hugh O'Brian not included, but seeing Vaughn left out despite being an Oscar nominee really stung. I hope whoever put together the segment will be fired next year for what they did to Robert Vaughn.

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Did anyone watch the "In Memoriam" segment last night?

 

Sara Barellis did a good job singing "Both Sides Now", which is a song I would have NEVER picked for the segment. It's better than "Hallelujah" or the Charlie Chaplin version of "Smile" for the hundredth time, but I wish they used "Believe" instead.

 

Oscar winners George Kennedy and Patty Duke and nominees Emmanuelle Riva, John Hurt, Gene Wilder, Debbie Reynolds, and Mary Tyler Moore were included along with Carrie Fisher, Anton Yelchin, Nancy Davis Reagan, Prince, and Zsa Zsa Gabor. Everyone else included in the tribute was either an actor I've never even heard of or a behind the scenes person.

 

The biggest snub of last night's segment was Oscar nominee Robert Vaughn. Yes, you read that right. Robert Vaughn was left out despite having been an Oscar nominee for The Young Philadelphians 57 years ago. Vaughn was also in classics like The Magnificent Seven and Bullitt, which people still watch today. It also hurt not to see Gloria DeHaven and Hugh O'Brian not included, but seeing Vaughn left out despite being an Oscar nominee really stung. I hope whoever put together the segment will be fired next year for what they did to Robert Vaughn.

 

Actually, I mentioned in another thread that I thought she butchered the song.  It's long been a favorite of mine.  But yeah, I'll agree it was an odd choice.  I was fearing a reprise of "The Way We Were", which for those type of presentations gets used almost a much as "Traces" does for graduating "class songs".

 

And Vaughn certainly DOES deserve a mention.  But, the segment I thought, was to include ANYbody who died the past year who was a familiar face(or not) to people and on both the big AND small screen.  Academy award winner or nominee notwithstanding.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I too was disappointed to see Robert Vaughn and Gloria DeHaven  not mentioned during the "In Memoriam" segment. Other names not mentioned- Edward Albee, Pierre Etaix, Barbara Hale, Michele Morgan and Fritz Weaver. The Academy would be better served if they took a look at TCM's "In Remembrance" segment to see how to properly honor talent that was lost during the year. As of late, it seems like the main focus during the "In Memoriam" segment now is the singer, not the people that are being honored.

 

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I too was disappointed to see Robert Vaughn and Gloria DeHaven  not mentioned during the "In Memoriam" segment. Other names not mentioned- Edward Albee, Pierre Etaix, Barbara Hale, Michele Morgan and Fritz Weaver. The Academy would be better served if they took a look at TCM's "In Remembrance" segment to see how to properly honor talent that was lost during the year. As of late, it seems like the main focus during the "In Memoriam" segment now is the singer, not the people that are being honored.

 

First welcome to the site.   Joan and James; what a combo!

 

Related to your post;  each year there are many people disappointed in the TCM tribute.   E.g.  why was so-and-so left out,  why did they show an actor from a film this director directed instead of the director themselves,,,,  etc..

 

These tributes are hard to make and choice have to be made and there will always be unsatisfied viewers.

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I remember in 2002 Dorothy McGuire was omitted from the segment.  Her family was upset and, as a Best Actress nominee and star of any number of Hollywood classics, that was considered a glaring mistake.  Farrah Fawcett was left out and fans were outraged, but the Academy at least explained that her fame came primarily from television, not film.

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Actually, I mentioned in another thread that I thought she butchered the song.  It's long been a favorite of mine. 

 

Always grew up hearing Joni Mitchell and Judy Collins sing it, and their late-60's/early-70's folk-roots renditions made it sound too....anorexic, if you know what I mean.  (In the Karen Carpenter sense.)

Listening to it now, with the more heartfelt context, it wasn't bad at that.  Checking iTunes now for some similarly good non-Joni/Judy cover of it.

 

Still, the gut-feels from the In Memoriam segments usually come from when we see the little Chuck Workman-like Memorable Movie Moment next to an otherwise forgotten technical, director, screenwriter or producer name.

Marnie Nixon's dead, that's too bad, but if we were to see her accompanied by little dreamlike iconic-montages of Audrey Hepburn and Natalie Wood, and Nixon herself in Sound of Music...aww.  

 

As it was, only Gene Wilder, Carrie Fisher and Prince got the Unforgettable-Moment tributes.

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I remember in 2002 Dorothy McGuire was omitted from the segment.  Her family was upset and, as a Best Actress nominee and star of any number of Hollywood classics, that was considered a glaring mistake.  Farrah Fawcett was left out and fans were outraged, but the Academy at least explained that her fame came primarily from television, not film.

 

and way too many TV people and those who died later in the year. Like they can't add a minute to the tribute and include another 25 or 30 people. Astounding that Dorothy McGuire could have been omitted.... but they also left out in their years Art Carney and Peggy Lee.  They barely recognized Debbie Reynolds but had Prince in there for several seconds. Some 20-year-old must have assembled this.

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and way too many TV people and those who died later in the year. Like they can't add a minute to the tribute and include another 25 or 30 people. Astounding that Dorothy McGuire could have been omitted.... but they also left out in their years Art Carney and Peggy Lee.  They barely recognized Debbie Reynolds but had Prince in there for several seconds. Some 20-year-old must have assembled this.

 

People now have to "pay" to get added (at least the less famous people). Dont understand why Carrie got the last slot after her mother in the tribute. Because younger people know her better? Debbie should have.

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