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Here's a surprise: Tyrone Power for Star of the Month


slaytonf
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Surprisingly, he's only had a day in SUTS.  Of course, immediately it will occur to people the reason he's not had his time in the lime is because he worked at Fox.  But in these modern times, with the wily 21st Century loosening its death grip on its catalog, the opportunity for redressing this long-standing wrong might exist.  A first-ranked star throughout his career, his life could have come from one of the movies that typified the ones he acted in.  Scion of a wealthy rubber manufacturer, his early life was lived in riches, until the suicide of his father (jumping from a bridge, no less, as I read) revealed it for the empty facade it was, leaving his surviving family penniless.  Work he did to earn his living.  Found he then the stage.  Hollywood found him, after fits and starts, finally making him a real star with his role in Lloyds of London (1936).  He was mainly delivered to the public as the counter to the lead female in romantic fare, working with as fine a list of actresses as you could want.  With one of the prettiest faces in movies (women included) he must've caused the weakening in uncounted pairs of knees--of any kind.  He despised the roles he was forced into, actively seeking grittier stuff to play.  He found it, too, delivering some powerful performances.  He found success in other genres, too, including comedy and swashbuckly--in my opinion comparing equally with Mr. Flynn in the latter.  I don't have to list his filmography.  I'm sure everyone has their favorite.  I would like to mention one of the less-well-known, Prince of Foxes (1949), with Orson Welles, directed by Henry King, and produced by-what else?-Twentieth Century Fox.  It starts out as a Machiavellian-inspired political intrigue pic set in Medici-era Italy.  The end runs to the action/adventure type, which is a little of a disappointment, considering the beginning.  But it's still a good one.

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Tyrone Power is definitely worthy of a SOTM tribute. It would be great if TCM could gather enough of his Fox films, especially the rare ones, and include those it usually airs to do a fairly comprehensive overview. Come on TCM, think out of the box, instead of what is easy.

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When it comes to Ty Power, he never gave a bad performance.

 

I like the same things that everybody else likes - - Zorro, The Black Swan, Blood and Sand, Rose of Washington Square, Eddy Duchin etc.

 

But I wish that everybody could see the ones that are so outstanding or not really typical of his image in Hollywood--

 

 

My personal favorites are:

 

The Sun Also Rises, Witness for the Prosecution, The Razor's Edge, and, of course, Nightmare Alley. The first three have tremendous actors and actresses working with him who have fantastic reputations, so you can see just how great he is, when he is backed up with people of equal standing.

 

Nightmare Alley is a tour-de-force for Tyrone Power and I really do believe had he been allowed to go on in that genre, he would have been one of the greatest noir stars of the post-war era.

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 Scion of a wealthy rubber manufacturer, his early life was lived in riches, until the suicide of his father (jumping from a bridge, no less, as I read) revealed it for the empty facade it was, leaving his surviving family penniless.

 

Tyrone Power was one of the great stars of Hollywood's Golden Era. Too often his acting ability was wasted in glamourous star vehicles but, particularly later in his career in films such as Nightmare Alley and, towards the very end, Abandon Ship he showed what a really strong dramatic actor he could be when given the opportunity.

 

I'm also a fan of the slow but handsomely produced Prince of Foxes. The film has great utilization of real castles in its Italian location shooting, and a brief but impressive battle sequence depicting the besiegement of a castle. With Orson Welles' cunning portrayal of Cesare Borgia, the film further benefits from Welles alumni Everett Sloane as a sly assassin who constantly switches political sides. The film's most memorable scene has Sloane proclaiming, "Out pops the jelly!" To anyone who has seen the film those words will be a chilling reminder of what is about to happen.

 

The Mark of Zorro, however, remains my favourite Power film, with one of his most endearing and skillful performances. His subtlety at delicate wry humour is on full display in his scenes as the fey Don Diego, and the film climaxes with one of the great screen duels in cinema history between himself and Basil Rathbone. I only wish the actor could have had material as good as this more often.

 

A correction, though, slaytonf. Please throw away whatever source told you that Power's father died a suicide.

 

Tyrone Power Sr., a stage and film actor who, among other stage roles, had played Claudius to John Barrymore's Hamlet, died of a heart attack, foreshadowing his son's similar death by 27 years. Power Sr. died in the arms of Power Jr., in fact.

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Surprisingly, he's only had a day in SUTS.  Of course, immediately it will occur to people the reason he's not had his time in the lime is because he worked at Fox.  But in these modern times, with the wily 21st Century loosening its death grip on its catalog, the opportunity for redressing this long-standing wrong might exist.  A first-ranked star throughout his career, his life could have come from one of the movies that typified the ones he acted in.  Scion of a wealthy rubber manufacturer, his early life was lived in riches, until the suicide of his father (jumping from a bridge, no less, as I read) revealed it for the empty facade it was, leaving his surviving family penniless.  Work he did to earn his living.  Found he then the stage.  Hollywood found him, after fits and starts, finally making him a real star with his role in Lloyds of London (1936).  He was mainly delivered to the public as the counter to the lead female in romantic fare, working with as fine a list of actresses as you could want.  With one of the prettiest faces in movies (women included) he must've caused the weakening in uncounted pairs of knees--of any kind.  He despised the roles he was forced into, actively seeking grittier stuff to play.  He found it, too, delivering some powerful performances.  He found success in other genres, too, including comedy and swashbuckly--in my opinion comparing equally with Mr. Flynn in the latter.  I don't have to list his filmography.  I'm sure everyone has their favorite.  I would like to mention one of the less-well-known, Prince of Foxes (1949), with Orson Welles, directed by Henry King, and produced by-what else?-Twentieth Century Fox.  It starts out as a Machiavellian-inspired political intrigue pic set in Medici-era Italy.  The end runs to the action/adventure type, which is a little of a disappointment, considering the beginning.  But it's still a good one.

a manufacturer of prophylactics?

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A correction, though, slaytonf. Please throw away whatever source told you that Power's father died a suicide.

 

Tyrone Power Sr., a stage and film actor who, among other stage roles, had played Claudius to John Barrymore's Hamlet, died of a heart attack, foreshadowing his son's similar death by 27 years. Power Sr. died in the arms of Power Jr., in fact.

 

 

Golly, was I that wrong?  I'll have to check. . . .

 

Aaah! You're right.  I was mixing up biographies.  But it's still a movie script bio.  His father's legacy didn't lead to work, so on a friend's advice, he went to Broadway.  Seems Hollywood is far-sighted, because, at the distance New York was from there, he got noticed like he wasn't before.  Ensue stardom.

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Slay--

 

The person that you describe sounds like Robert Montgomery, Elizabeth Montgomery's father. I don't know how you got the two of them confused.

 

 

That's it.  I got them mixed up because I am on a campaign to find stars that deserve the red velvet treatment.  Reading lots of material on them created a meltdown in my mental circuits.  I was thinking of Mr. Montgomery, but opted for Tyrone Power, instead--for now.  

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I've read two biographies of Tyrone Power, both of which gave me a different view of the man.

 

I'll always remember Farley Granger's tale of a visit to the home of Tyrone Power and his then-wife, Linda Christian.

 

She asked Farley Granger if he wanted him or her.

 

Mr. Granger did not continue with the story.

 

Tryone Power inhabited every role with grace and beauty - and talent, too.

 

 

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