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FORGOTTEN Oldies


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I was 9(and still of course, in elementary, or "primary" school?) when my best friend's older sister brought this record home.  But over time I learned it wasn't a Capitol label record, so ....   The still on the clip  I think hasn't much to do with the original release...  At the time, the only surfing I was familiar with was 

;)  

Well, on to the Beach Boys----

From  '61 if not mistaken.   But a few weeks before my  10th birthday.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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6 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I was 9(and still of course, in elementary, or "primary" school?) when my best friend's older sister brought this record home.  But over time I learned it wasn't a Capitol label record, so ....   The still on the clip  I think hasn't much to do with the original release...  At the time, the only surfing I was familiar with was 

;)  

Well, on to the Beach Boys----

From  '61 if not mistaken.   But a few weeks before my  10th birthday.  ;) 

Sepiatone

"Hawaiian Eye" with Poncie Ponce!

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The 70's is my favorite decade for music. It's before my time, but good is good no matter the decade. I don't listen to current music all that much. Just don't care for it. Everyone sounds the same to me. My dad is a big influence on me musically. I'm proud that I can say he has introduced me to a lot of forgotten albums/songs from his teenage years and now they're all that I listen to.

Does anyone know these two selections?

This next one I discovered myself. 😊

 

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4 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

Wow!  PAUL WILLIAMS.  I actually own 3 CDs of his music, including A Little On The Windy Side!  Here's the whole album: 

 

I really like this. I found it on iTunes. I might buy it.

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23 minutes ago, Rudy's Girl said:

The 70's is my favorite decade for music. It's before my time, but good is good no matter the decade. I don't listen to current music all that much. Just don't care for it. Everyone sounds the same to me. My dad is a big influence on me musically. I'm proud that I can say he has introduced me to a lot of forgotten albums/songs from his teenage years and now they're all that I listen to.

Does anyone know these two selections?

This next one I discovered myself. 😊

 

Barbara Lewis had a big hit with  "Hello Stranger" in 1963. She wrote the song.

Yvonne Elliman sings it verbatim the same way with the same arrangement.

But Yvonne had her own big hits too. She was very lucky because The Bee Gees wrote for her.

Paul Williams was a popular composer who wrote hits for Karen Carpenter and her brother--The Carpenters. His music was so popular that he also performed in public and recorded.

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One of my favorite Paul Williams/Roger Nichols songs is "Out in the Country" by Three Dog Night. Another song by Yvonne Elliman that I really like is "I Can't Get You Outta My Mind."  Not to get off-topic, but I remember them both being on Hawaii Five-0.

 

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13 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Paul Williams was a popular composer who wrote hits for Karen Carpenter and her brother--The Carpenters. His music was so popular that he also performed in public and recorded.

Was?  He also wrote for HELEN REDDY and THREE DOG NIGHT and with BARBRA STREISAND... many others, plus his first album Someday Man (which I own and listen to sometimes) was released in 1970... he didn't sell as well as artists he wrote for, but he started recording pretty early.  Did I mention my favorite DAVID BOWIE album is Hunky Dory, and my favorite track is a song WILLIAMS wrote with his songwriting partner BIFF ROSE: "Fill Your Heart"?

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6 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

He also wrote for HELEN REDDY and THREE DOG NIGHT and with BARBRA STREISAND

"Evergreen" is a beautiful song. I believe he won an Oscar for the lyrics. I'm a big fan of Helen Reddy. "Crazy Love" is one of my fav love songs, even though I think it was Van Morrison's first. I like her version better.

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

We've kind of gone astray here.   Let's get back on track=-----

And too....  Remember psychedelia?  ------------------ ('67)

;)

Sepiatone

 it seems like I bought one of their records called "We Ain't Got Nothing Yet". 

Far as American "British Invasion" music went these were pretty good. The Outsiders were pretty good too--but for the most part the American scene was rather mediocre-- garage bands who should have stayed in the garage.

The American scene on the West Coast was top quality and the Lovin Spoonful were very competitive and Innovative coming out of Greenwich Village.

 

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21 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 it seems like I bought one of their records called "We Ain't Got Nothing Yet"

Far as American "British Invasion" music went these were pretty good. The Outsiders were pretty good too--but for the most part the American scene was rather mediocre-- garage bands who should have stayed in the garage.

The American scene on the West Coast was top quality and the Lovin Spoonful were very competitive and Innovative coming out of Greenwich Village.

 

That was their third single , which hit the radio just on the heels of their cover(one of over 200) of TOBACCO  ROAD. in '66( not '67, which was my goof)  The Blues Magoos were regulars at Detroit's Checkmate club,  which me and a buddy would be "snuck" into by his older brother, who worked there.  The Magoos of course, weren't a Detroit band, but from New York,  so there were probably several other places in other towns in which they were considered "regulars", just like Cleveland's JAMES GANG were also pretty much "regulars" at Detroit's Grande Ballroom.  ;) 

ALLHALLOWS--- that Pat Boone tune surely SHOULD be forgotten  ;)  just like his white bread cover of....  

But too, I'll humbly admit that as a kid, I did like and bought the 45 of this Pat Boone tune...... (from '61 or 2)

;) 

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

That was their third single , which hit the radio just on the heels of their cover(one of over 200) of TOBACCO  ROAD. in '66( not '67, which was my goof)  The Blues Magoos were regulars at Detroit's Checkmate club,  which me and a buddy would be "snuck" into by his older brother, who worked there.  The Magoos of course, weren't a Detroit band, but from New York,  so there were probably several other places in other towns in which they were considered "regulars", just like Cleveland's JAMES GANG were also pretty much "regulars" at Detroit's Grande Ballroom.  ;) 

ALLHALLOWS--- that Pat Boone tune surely SHOULD be forgotten  ;)  just like his white bread cover of....  

But too, I'll humbly admit that as a kid, I did like and bought the 45 of this Pat Boone tune...... (from '61 or 2)

;) 

Sepiatone

 The Nashville Teens had a hit with "Tobacco Road" in 1964 as part of the British Invasion. The record you're talking about must have been a cover and it was never a national hit.

As far as Pat Boone was concerned, a lot of people were doing what he did starting with Ricky Nelson and others.

Pat Boone had a very good voice and was a real legitimate singer. Later he went into the movies. He was on the same level of real singers who did standard material. In those days legitimate singers had to try to do rock and roll to get on the charts. Andy Williams covered somebody's rock and roll song and got a number one hit out of it called "Butterfly". And Ricky Nelson covered Fats Domino's song "I'm Walking" and got a career out of it.

Those who could sing well did go on to do that and Pat Boone was certainly one of them.

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22 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

As far as Pat Boone was concerned, a lot of people were doing what he did starting with Ricky Nelson and others.

Pat Boone had a very good voice and was a real legitimate singer. Later he went into the movies. He was on the same level of real singers who did standard material. In those days legitimate singers had to try to do rock and roll to get on the charts. Andy Williams covered somebody's rock and roll song and got a number one hit out of it called "Butterfly". And Ricky Nelson covered Fats Domino's song "I'm Walking" and got a career out of it.

Those who could sing well did go on to do that and Pat Boone was certainly one of them.

White artists were covering black artists long before PAT or RICKY... The difference for RICKY NELSON was surrounding himself with talent like JAMES BURTON (guitar god) and JAMES KIRKLAND.  I don't dislike PAT BOONE, but I don't like his records and hear even middle of the road (at best) stuff like  "Be Bop Baby" more than any PAT BOONE at all. 

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