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Just now, Allhallowsday said:

We had an electircal record player in a carry case; it had 4 speeds - 15, 33, 45, and 78! 

Everybody had one.

We called those stereos.

Mine was a little red jobby that a little girl could easily carry.

But my older brother had a very big stereo that he would take outside in the backyard and broadcast with these big speakers.

When he wasn't at home, I would go into his room and play my Beatle albums on it-- those 2 speakers were good and loud!

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1 minute ago, Allhallowsday said:

Yeh well it weren't no stereo. 

Then I guess you had a little portable record player.

It sounds so quaint to use that phrase record player, but that's what it was.

I can remember in grade school that is what the teachers used to play the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway shows.

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2 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Then I guess you had a little portable record player.

It sounds so quaint to use that phrase record player, but that's what it was.

I can remember in grade school that is what the teachers used to play the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway shows.

That's what I wrote.  "Record player". .. "in a carry case". 

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2 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

That's what I wrote.  "Record player". .. "in a carry case". 

That's what we called a stereo because everybody I knew had stereos except for the teachers in schools with their limited budget.

The 1950s was the age of stereophonic sound.

Check out the movie "Silk Stockings" starring Fred Astaire-- there's a Cole Porter number in that movie that explains it very well.

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I think there was a "cusp" in the tech transition, just as in the mid to late '80's you were able to still buy either CDs or vinyl LPs.  Example:   

Though it was also available on CD, I bought STEVE WINWOOD's   "Back In The High Life"('86) on vinyl due to CDs still being priced much higher than they'd eventually cost. 

At first, since my step sister also had "Tutti Frutti" on 45, I thought it was available on 78 "back then" (ten or so years before I acquired the 78)  due to the belief that African-Americans, likely the more strident fans of that "appalling" rock'n'roll music (or so whitey probably believed) couldn't afford the proper machines with which to play 45rpm records.  That of course, turned out to be just silly assumption on my adolescent part.  :rolleyes:

And ALLHALLOWS--  I think you meant that old phonograph you mention had 16rpm, not 15 ;)  I've never seen a 16 rpm platter, but understand they were mostly used in the  late '40's-early '50's    for Audio books or pre recorded radio broadcasts( which too I read somewhere was the speed's main use during WWII) .  I'm not sure how long making recordings for 16rpm platters lasted.  

Incidentally.....   I still have a "home stereo" system.  I play only CDs for music through it, but do have an ols MARANTZ stereo receiver  in the basement with a turntable hooked up to it for all the vinyl I still have.  There's no room for the turntable upstairs in my entertainment center, as other medium components take up much space.  I also have one of those CROSLEY "retro" components that along with vinyl platters also accommodates CDs and cassette tapes  and has a 78rpm setting for my 78s and old cassettes that have no CD reissues available.  The system upstairs also handles the sound from VHS tapes and DVDs

Sepiatone

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We had a huge console stereo with the 4-speed turntable, and an AM/FM tuner built in.  Must've been six feet wide.  The AM dial had the CONELRAD markings on it.  I didn't know what that was (I was born in 1963) until I was an adult.  One of our local stations in my small town just happened to be at one of those frequencies, so I always thought growing up that the factory magically knew what your local radio stations were and marked it for you on the dial. 

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I never thought much of their 2nd and 3rd LPs  , as they weren't as good as their  debut LP,   and I enjoyed their never being nailed down.  I read them referred to as :hard rock",  "proto metal",  "acid rock"  and as the Fathers of "Heavy Metal"  but to me, the one who described it best was a writer for CREEM magazine, who called their music "Speed-Rock".   And I also liked this version of an old blues tune I liked for years before---

Sho' 'nuff!   Guns 'n' What?    Motley Who?   Def Whazzit?  :D  HEAVY METAL??   Gosh, I though you meant HELIUM metal!  :D  Really, I thought that's what Axl Rosebud inhaled before steppin' up to the mic!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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I think BLUE CHEER are the progenitors of what came to be called Heavy Metal.  In fact, LED ZEPPELIN may have copied what BLUE CHEER was doing.  I actually like BLUE CHEER's second album better than the first, but the first one is special.  BTW the old blues tune is "Parchman Farm" - they knew the song by ear...  so misspelled it!  BLACK SABBATH often get the credit BLUE CHEER deserves; of course BLACK SABBATH are overrated. 

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In fact, the first time I and others first heard the term "Heavy Metal" in relation to music was in a K-TEL records song compilation called "Heavy Metal" commercial from '70 or so that oddly included a few artists who later would NEVER be considered "Heavy Metal" artists.  My attempts to find the clip with the cover were in vain, I did find it a couple of years ago, but sadly posted it in a forum that no longer exists.  So I'll offer this "oldie" (and possibly forgotten too...)   '49

Sepiatone

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1 minute ago, Allhallowsday said:

^ I don't know it.  Uh, maybe understandably forgotten.  ROY BROWN only charted Billboard once in July 1957 with "Let The Four Winds Blow"

 

Roy Brown was one of the best rhythm and blues singers I ever heard. I had his record on 45--

" Good Rockin at Midnight ".

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This Detroit boy was once thought of as an answer to Fats Domino.   didn't get as big(fame-wise ;) ) but did do a lot of work for early Motown....

Richard "Popcorn" Wylie    possibly '60 or '61?

Sepiatone

 

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

This Detroit boy was once thought of as an answer to Fats Domino.   didn't get as big(fame-wise ;) ) but did do a lot of work for early Motown....

Richard "Popcorn" Wylie    possibly '60 or '61?

Sepiatone

 

Sep-- Living near a big city you got a lot of Records over there that never reached the Midwest. And this Popcorn is probably just one example.

 But Fats Domino did make it to Northeast Kansas and I saw him once in his Heyday and Glory sitting at the piano doing "Blueberry Hill". And that was the only 78 I ever had.

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It's sad your 78 library was so limited.  But mine grew over time by scouring yard/garage sales and any used record shops I could find to look for certain items.  Like some early FATS DOMINO recordings mentioned in KEN KESEY's "Sometimes a Great notion"( Great novel.  I highly recommend it.)  Like----

Sepiatone

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm sure you don't believe he thought up the name.   No doubt Muddy's song was an inspiration.  ;) 

And in the "same name, different song" category, here's one that came out about the same time the other by the same name(that you'll probably think of) came out.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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49 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

HEY.....   Remember this folk trio?

Sepiatone

Next you'll be posting Frank Ifield. LOL But he wasn't all that bad, at all.

But seriously, if memory serves me correct, Dusty Springfield is in that group. She was simply one of the greatest top 40 singers ever and could sing any style. She was one of the few, aside from Dionne Warwick, who could even work with Burt Bacharach because he was so demanding and precise. In other words, he expected the kind of professionalism that you got from the top singers.

But I have to say the top 40 people that he worked with had decent range and we're enjoyable to listen to, like Gene Pitney, Bobby Vee-- But Tom Jones was special--on a much higher level.

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