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Warren Beatty to Guest Host TCM Tonight (January 4, 2017)


Barton_Keyes
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While many have certainly heard of the "triple threat" (a person who can act, sing and dance), another important accolade is the quadruple threat: a person who has been nominated for Best Picture, Director, Actor and Writing at the Academy Awards for a single film. This particular distinction is quite rare, with few people receiving this honor.

 

Warren Beatty is one of them, and, according to http://www.tcm.com/this-month/movie-news.html?id=1285705&name=Warren-Beatty-to-host-Quadruple-Threats-1-4-on-TCM, he will be appearing on TCM tonight to introduce two of his own films, HEAVEN CAN WAIT and REDS, and Orson Welles' CITIZEN KANE.

 

Warren%2BBeatty%2Bwide.jpg

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It's about time that TCM give the people what they want, a real live movie star hosting Classic Movies, who is not just a movie star but is someone who actually creates movies.

 

It goes on and on, and they have all kinds of people who know a lot about film, as much as anybody on this website or less, but people really want to see the people who make film discuss it.

 

I can remember the first time I saw Carrie Fisher with Robert Osborne discussing film. They actually had someone on who knew what they were talking about from experience. Someone who was not only knowledgeable and witty, but an actual creator/artist in cinema - - That's what we need to see more of.

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TCM actually gets a major film star and creator as presenter on tonight and some posters want to throw age zingers at him. Perhaps jealousy that Warren Beatty has actually accomplished something with his life has something to do with it.

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TCM actually gets a major film star and creator as presenter on tonight and some posters want to throw age zingers at him. Perhaps jealousy that Warren Beatty has actually accomplished something with his life has something to do with it.

 

Tom--

 

To be frank with you, there are some young people today who haven't been taught manners as we were taught growing up in the 1950s. My grandmother taught me to have respect for older people. And then the joke she would say was-- you're young now, but if you live long enough and you're lucky, you might get to be old too!

 

From my perspective, I can honestly say that a man or woman who was a genius at 30 is probably not like the average octogenarian at Walmart when they get to 80 years of age.

 

The tendency that we have in this society to put everybody in the same category/ demographic-- that's called stereotyping, whether it's age, sex, race, sexual preference excetera is ridiculous.

 

People are individuals and need to be treated as such.

 

I listened to Warren tonight and I can honestly say that I don't know many 30 year- olds who are as lucid or are as smart, as he is OR who could produce and take the lead role in a movie like Bonnie and Clyde.

 

In reviewing Warren's record in American Cinema, the only person I can compare it to is Orson Welles.

 

Unfortunately Orson couldn't be with us tonight, but we were very fortunate to hear from Warren.

 

Talking about what you've accomplished in life is not self-promotion, it's sharing your art with those who are interested.

 

There's so much trash out there in the entertainment marketplace today that I honestly believe that some young people have trouble discerning or understanding or appreciating art-- as well as the artists--when they encounter it.

 

We only have any artist for a brief period of time, so we should show some respect and appreciation.

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Tom--

 

To be frank with you, there are some young people today who haven't been taught manners as we were taught growing up in the 1950s. My grandmother taught me to have respect for older people. And then the joke she would say was-- you're young now, but if you live long enough and you're lucky, you might get to be old too!

 

From my perspective, I can honestly say that a man or woman who was a genius at 30 is probably not like the average octogenarian at Walmart when they get to 80 years of age.

 

The tendency that we have in this society to put everybody in the same category/ demographic-- that's called stereotyping, whether it's age, sex, race, sexual preference excetera is ridiculous.

 

People are individuals and need to be treated as such.

 

I listened to Warren tonight and I can honestly say that I don't know many 30 year- olds who are as lucid or are as smart, as he is OR who could produce and take the lead role in a movie like Bonnie and Clyde.

 

In reviewing Warren's record in American Cinema, the only person I can compare it to is Orson Welles.

 

Unfortunately Orson couldn't be with us tonight, but we were very fortunate to hear from Warren.

 

Talking about what you've accomplished in life is not self-promotion, it's sharing your art with those who are interested.

 

There's so much trash out there in the entertainment marketplace today that I honestly believe that some young people have trouble discerning or understanding or appreciating art-- as well as the artists--when they encounter it.

 

We only have any artist for a brief period of time, so we should show some respect and appreciation.

 

Beautifully stated, Princess.

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A major star with 15 Oscar nominations as actor, director, producer, writer. Oscar winning director for Reds and winner of Irving Thalberg special Oscar.

 

With several Marion Davies film premieres coming up (The Bride's Play (1921) premieres in March), I wonder if she'll get a mention in Beatty's intro of Citizen Kane?

 

-----------------

 

The dopey age comments should be deleted as irrelevant and stupid.

 

 

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I didn't have a chance to watch Warren. I do have the Reds DVD and saw the film three times when it was first released. I think it's a brilliant, moving, monumental film -- a beautifully done epic romance in the best sense of the classics, with the added innovation of the Witnesses and their sometimes moving sometimes amusing versions of their own history. One of my top ten films of all time.

 

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TCM actually gets a major film star and creator as presenter on tonight and some posters want to throw age zingers at him. Perhaps jealousy that Warren Beatty has actually accomplished something with his life has something to do with it.

He seemed a bit catatonic to me, as if he was all played out. All I saw was his discussion with Ben before HEAVEN CAN WAIT.

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He seemed a bit catatonic to me, as if he was all played out. All I saw was his discussion with Ben before HEAVEN CAN WAIT.

 

In a recent NY Times profile of Beatty, for which he was interviewed for several hours, the writer noted that there's a big difference between Warren's on-the-record and off-the record conversations:

 

We also spent two hours talking before he consented to being recorded. Inquisitive and engaging, Mr. Beatty said he wanted to get to know me. But when he finally did go on the record, the colorful tales vanished, the free-flowing chat dried up, and his speech became so tortuously stilted that I had to ask why he was suddenly talking like a robot. “If you think I am being careful, you are correct,” he said in a slow drip.

Then there were the pauses, some so long that I wondered if he had forgotten the question. He would start a word, then stop, then start again, then sigh. The silence yawned. Planes passed overhead. This seems to be his way: Interviewers have been noting these peculiarities for decades.

 

I would guess that we were getting the more guarded "on-the-record" Beatty on TCM last night, although I think you could see him visibly relax when he talked about his movies.  I saw him both after HEAVEN CAN WAIT and before REDS, and he seemed very articulate and interesting during both conversations with Ben, once he had settled on how to answer Ben's questions.  (I hope I'm half that articulate when I'm nearing 80.  Heck, I'd like to be that articulate at my current age, which is considerably younger.)

 

Because I didn't see any advance promotion of his appearance, I was totally surprised by seeing a creator of Beatty's magnitude -- actor, director, writer, producer -- on TCM, and I'd say it was one of the most thrilling things I've seen on the channel for years.  Let's face it, there aren't many stars left from the golden age of Hollywood, so we're probably never going to see someone like past interviewees Mickey Rooney, Lauren Bacall, or Robert Mitchum on TCM again.  Beatty came along right at the end of the golden age, so he not only knew and worked with some of the folks from that era, but also, from what I've heard, revered their work. (I've read that THE PHILADELPHIA STORY was a major influence on his decision to go into show business.)  I think we were very lucky to see him on TCM.

 

Although I like other Beatty movies, REDS is definitely my favorite, and probably one of my favorites of all movies.  Like one of the other folks here, I saw it three times in the theatre when it was first released -- a substantial investment of time for a movie that runs over three hours -- and have watched it since then on DVD.  I love the romance and drama being played out among historical events, love seeing notable figures of the time being played by notable actors (e.g., Eugene O'Neill played by Jack Nicholson), and love the testimony of the Witnesses, who bring widely varying first-hand perspectives to the events in the movie.  Beatty and Diane Keaton each do a great job in their lead roles, as do all of the supporting players.  From what I've read, Beatty started working on the screenplay for REDS in the 60s, and filmed the first Witness interview in 1971, so it was obviously a film about which he cared deeply, and that shows on the screen.  I can't imagine how he could have done better as the star, director, writer, and producer.  An outstanding work, one that Warren can justly be very proud of.

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I didn't see any of the films last night, but I've seen them before, so I knew what I missed.

 

I've always liked Beatty as an actor and director, the only film of his I couldn't  really get "into" was SHAMPOO.

 

I can't say much about his interviewing behavior though, I've never seen an interview with him.  But, there are others in the "biz" who although are brilliant in films and when giving speeches at awards ceremonies or other occasions, give lousy interviews.  One local newsman/talk show host said HIS worst experience with an interview was with ELLIOTT GOULD.

 

Who really knows why?  Could be they were caught at or near the end of a long trail of interviews and got tired of answering the same questions over and over, or thought the questions dumb.  And maybe some celebrities don't like talking about themselves as much as other celebrities do.  And some certainly DO.    But anyway.....

 

I've long thought TCM should, if the party agrees to it, treat the "guest host" situation the wasy they do on SNL.  You know, just the "guest host" introducing the film and doing a bit of preamble with no Ben or Bob sitting across from them conducting a simultaneous  interview/movie intro.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Gentle people-

 

I'm impressed that there exists people in the world that will mount steed and tilt for a great Hollywood talent. And I certainly hope you do the same so when there's a major skirmish, as when someone attacks Warren Beatty for his liberal (often categorized by his detractors as "commie") sympathies.

 

Now...

If one has watched Warren Beatty's interviews or even occasional Red Carpet snippets -especially during the Annette Bening years of his life (24 years already)- you will have noted a sedate, and -as some in this thread have well-observed- nearly metaphorically "catatonic" Beatty. This is a mighty contrast from his rakish jet-setting persona of the late 60s-70s.

 

In BingFan's wonderful post, he cites a profile where Beatty acknowledges his new "safe" tact. So, it is not simply some cheap, ageist jab I take when I tease Warren for his sluggish, pokey modern persona. It's the fact that this public display of an elder statesman in repose is an affectation. Lest you think this all ret-con CYA foofram, I started perceiving it that way when I noticed how his somewhat weary way of expressing himself reminded me not of a mature Warren, but an aged George ("Shampoo"). He was playing a role.

 

So, folks, if Warren is going to put US on, I have no problem suggesting that he might consider a cup of warm milk- and maybe a light wrap- before retiring. The fact this characterization so far away from the rock star image of his physical prime is what makes it funny, not mean.

 

You can be darn sure that I'd never make the same joke about Eva Marie Saint.

 

PS- For what it's worth, I find Beatty an articulate, intelligent and passionate man. I could go on, but that would be a bit more self-indulgent than I am currently feeling.

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Wow. Well, I can't express how depressed I am that I missed this. I felt at times like I was Beatty's only defender in the thread on Rules Don't Apply, in which many, many potshots were lobbed at him by multiple posters. One poster in particular took great joy in the film's financial failure, I think because he objects to Beatty's political opinions (it's the same guy who thinks TCM should fire Ben Mankiewicz because he apparently has a podcast 99.9 per cent of TCM's viewers have never heard of on which he expresses liberal views). Between that thread and the one on Vertigo where I learned most of my fellow posters, at least the ones who cared to express an opinion, felt this much-lauded film was at best mediocre and hardly one of Hitchcock's crowning achievements, I'm coming to the realization that I'm not really in lockstep with a lot of my fellow posters, opinion-wise. I saw Rules in the theater (yes, I was the one, in anticipation of the low-attendance jokes). Not Beatty's greatest film ever but certainly competent and enjoyable, and it was a delight for me to see him on the big screen again after a 15-year absence. Certainly undeserving of the drubbing it received here and elsewhere, in my opinion, by people who have clearly never seen Freddy Got Fingered or The Expendables 2, But okay, that's not my purpose for posting, so let me refocus.

 

Was there any promotion for this event on TCM's homepage? I missed it if there was. I had looked at the schedule and was aware that the two Beatty films were airing, but as I'm a huge Beatty fan, they were both films I had seen many times before. Neverthless, I turned on TCM in the middle of Reds and watched about an hour of it, but I missed the intros and outros completely. I went to bed having no idea Beatty had been on, and I guess yesterday was a rare day I didn't get on the message boards either, because I didn't know until three hours ago that this had happened.

 

I have to say this sort of thing frustrates me about TCM. We all know they run promos for the Wine Club practically between every movie, but an appearance by a star of Beatty's magnitude gets zero promotional attention on the actual channel and maybe zero on the website (as I say, I'm not sure about that - I certainly didn't see it on the big banner, anyway). This thing only airs once and will never air again. So, if you missed it, you missed it, unless you can obtain a recording somewhere or it surfaces on YouTube. I think from a business sense, it might behoove TCM to let its viewers know the Beatty appearance is coming on the actual network.  I have to assume some portion of TCM's viewers aren't online-savvy.

 

Winslow, I wouldn't say Beatty's "safe tact" isn't exactly new. To the best of my memory, he's been hesitant and cautious in answering questions with lots of stops and starts all the way back to the days of Shampoo or so. However, I found this link to highlights of an interview with Beatty conducted by Alec Baldwin at a TCM Film Festival screening of Reds in 2011, where he apparently really relaxed and opened up (how did I never know about this before either? When was there ever a TCM promo saying Warren Freaking Beatty was going to be at a TCM Film Festival? I never saw it). I guess the mockers can point out the irony of one multimillionaire interviewing another about a film documenting the American Communist movement, but anyway, here it is:

 

http://www.assignmentx.com/2011/warren-beatty-discusses-his-1981-film-reds-at-the-2011-tcm-classic-film-festival/

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Wow. Well, I can't express how depressed I am that I missed this. I felt at times like I was Beatty's only defender in the thread on Rules Don't Apply, in which many, many potshots were lobbed at him by multiple posters. One poster in particular took great joy in the film's financial failure, I think because he objects to Beatty's political opinions (it's the same guy who thinks TCM should fire Ben Mankiewicz because he apparently has a podcast 99.9 per cent of TCM's viewers have never heard of on which he expresses liberal views). Between that thread and the one on Vertigo where I learned most of my fellow posters, at least the ones who cared to express an opinion, felt this much-lauded film was at best mediocre and hardly one of Hitchcock's crowning achievements, I'm coming to the realization that I'm not really in lockstep with a lot of my fellow posters, opinion-wise. I saw Rules in the theater (yes, I was the one, in anticipation of the low-attendance jokes). Not Beatty's greatest film ever but certainly competent and enjoyable, and it was a delight for me to see him on the big screen again after a 15-year absence. Certainly undeserving of the drubbing it received here and elsewhere, in my opinion, by people who have clearly never seen Freddy Got Fingered or The Expendables 2, But okay, that's not my purpose for posting, so let me refocus.

 

Was there any promotion for this event on TCM's homepage? I missed it if there was. I had looked at the schedule and was aware that the two Beatty films were airing, but as I'm a huge Beatty fan, they were both films I had seen many times before. Neverthless, I turned on TCM in the middle of Reds and watched about an hour of it, but I missed the intros and outros completely. I went to bed having no idea Beatty had been on, and I guess yesterday was a rare day I didn't get on the message boards either, because I didn't know until three hours ago that this had happened.

 

I have to say this sort of thing frustrates me about TCM. We all know they run promos for the Wine Club practically between every movie, but an appearance by a star of Beatty's magnitude gets zero promotional attention on the actual channel and maybe zero on the website (as I say, I'm not sure about that - I certainly didn't see it on the big banner, anyway). This thing only airs once and will never air again. So, if you missed it, you missed it, unless you can obtain a recording somewhere or it surfaces on YouTube. I think from a business sense, it might behoove TCM to let its viewers know the Beatty appearance is coming on the actual network.  I have to assume some portion of TCM's viewers aren't online-savvy.

 

Winslow, I wouldn't say Beatty's "safe tact" isn't exactly new. To the best of my memory, he's been hesitant and cautious in answering questions with lots of stops and starts all the way back to the days of Shampoo or so. However, I found this link to highlights of an interview with Beatty conducted by Alec Baldwin at a TCM Film Festival screening of Reds in 2011, where he apparently really relaxed and opened up (how did I never know about this before either? When was there ever a TCM promo saying Warren Freaking Beatty was going to be at a TCM Film Festival? I never saw it). I guess the mockers can point out the irony of one multimillionaire interviewing another about a film documenting the American Communist movement, but anyway, here it is:

 

http://www.assignmentx.com/2011/warren-beatty-discusses-his-1981-film-reds-at-the-2011-tcm-classic-film-festival/

 

Beatty is not a talking head. He's a thinking head, something the selfie-crazed generation that sees everything as a reality TV show can't grasp.

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In response to my own question, I did find a listing for the Beatty "guest-hosting" spot (if that's the right word) at the very bottom of the TCM homepage in the news box, the last listing. Hardly prominent placement. Not up there on the banner with Jane Wyman, Vanessa Redgrave and the recipe thing. 

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In a recent NY Times profile of Beatty, for which he was interviewed for several hours, the writer noted that there's a big difference between Warren's on-the-record and off-the record conversations:

 

We also spent two hours talking before he consented to being recorded. Inquisitive and engaging, Mr. Beatty said he wanted to get to know me. But when he finally did go on the record, the colorful tales vanished, the free-flowing chat dried up, and his speech became so tortuously stilted that I had to ask why he was suddenly talking like a robot. “If you think I am being careful, you are correct,” he said in a slow drip.

Then there were the pauses, some so long that I wondered if he had forgotten the question. He would start a word, then stop, then start again, then sigh. The silence yawned. Planes passed overhead. This seems to be his way: Interviewers have been noting these peculiarities for decades.

 

I would guess that we were getting the more guarded "on-the-record" Beatty on TCM last night, although I think you could see him visibly relax when he talked about his movies.  I saw him both after HEAVEN CAN WAIT and before REDS, and he seemed very articulate and interesting during both conversations with Ben, once he had settled on how to answer Ben's questions.  (I hope I'm half that articulate when I'm nearing 80.  Heck, I'd like to be that articulate at my current age, which is considerably younger.)

 

Because I didn't see any advance promotion of his appearance, I was totally surprised by seeing a creator of Beatty's magnitude -- actor, director, writer, producer -- on TCM, and I'd say it was one of the most thrilling things I've seen on the channel for years.  Let's face it, there aren't many stars left from the golden age of Hollywood, so we're probably never going to see someone like past interviewees Mickey Rooney, Lauren Bacall, or Robert Mitchum on TCM again.  Beatty came along right at the end of the golden age, so he not only knew and worked with some of the folks from that era, but also, from what I've heard, revered their work. (I've read that THE PHILADELPHIA STORY was a major influence on his decision to go into show business.)  I think we were very lucky to see him on TCM.

 

Although I like other Beatty movies, REDS is definitely my favorite, and probably one of my favorites of all movies.  Like one of the other folks here, I saw it three times in the theatre when it was first released -- a substantial investment of time for a movie that runs over three hours -- and have watched it since then on DVD.  I love the romance and drama being played out among historical events, love seeing notable figures of the time being played by notable actors (e.g., Eugene O'Neill played by Jack Nicholson), and love the testimony of the Witnesses, who bring widely varying first-hand perspectives to the events in the movie.  Beatty and Diane Keaton each do a great job in their lead roles, as do all of the supporting players.  From what I've read, Beatty started working on the screenplay for REDS in the 60s, and filmed the first Witness interview in 1971, so it was obviously a film about which he cared deeply, and that shows on the screen.  I can't imagine how he could have done better as the star, director, writer, and producer.  An outstanding work, one that Warren can justly be very proud of.

One of the things I remember most about Beatty is that he was one of the only ones to stand up and applaud for Elia Kazan at the Kazan tribute. He of course owed his career to Kazan because Kazan selected him for SPLEMDOR IN THE GRASS.

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One of the things I remember most about Beatty is that he was one of the only ones to stand up and applaud for Elia Kazan at the Kazan tribute. He of course owed his career to Kazan because Kazan selected him for SPLEMDOR IN THE GRASS.

 

It's no secret that both Warren and his sister have strong political views and they have never been afraid to express them or to go against the grain of conventional or conformist thinking.

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