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Has anyone ever seen the Barbara Stanwyck movie "The Other Love"?


Debra Johnson
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If so answer me these 2 questions.  I just fininsed watching and:

 

1. I've come across "sanatoriums" in several classic movies/tv shows.  Do they still exist today?  Are today's "rehab centers" what "sanatoriums" were back then?

 

2. Barbara's character had TB......I thought that was a very contagious disease yet she was gallavanting around, coughing all over the place and kissing men.  Wouldn't she have infected others as well?

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If so answer me these 2 questions.  I just fininsed watching and:

 

1. I've come across "sanatoriums" in several classic movies/tv shows.  Do they still exist today?  Are today's "rehab centers" what "sanatoriums" were back then?

 

People went to places called sanitariums or -oriums (oria? orii?) in order to  "dry out". Faulkner and IIRC Chandler both did this -- I believe some characters do it in Chandler novels. That would be the equivalent of rehab

 

With the difference, other than substance abused, that sanitariums were for people with money. Today drug rehab is often part of a court-imposed punishment, so anybody can go.

 

 

2. Barbara's character had TB......I thought that was a very contagious disease yet she was gallavanting around, coughing all over the place and kissing men.  Wouldn't she have infected others as well  

 

 

F, Scott Fitzgerald claimed to have had a TB episode (biographers are in dispute over it). I do know that he told Sheilah Graham that he had. In one of her books she decribed how he flew into a rage when she tried to use of his cups/plates after he'd used it. I don't know what their physical relationship was like, but per Graham FSF insisted she hot-wash any cups, plates, or utensils afer he'd used them, and that she never eat food after he'd eaten off it.

 

If you're interested in more about the sanitarium life of the time, the Maugham film Trio has a section w/ Jean Simmons and Michael Rennie at one, and of course Mann's novel The Magic Mountain is set in one.

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People went to places called sanitariums or -oriums (oria? orii?) in order to  "dry out". Faulkner and IIRC Chandler both did this -- I believe some characters do it in Chandler novels. That would be the equivalent of rehab

 

With the difference, other than substance abused, that sanitariums were for people with money. Today drug rehab is often part of a court-imposed punishment, so anybody can go.

 

 

 

 

F, Scott Fitzgerald claimed to have had a TB episode (biographers are in dispute over it). I do know that he told Sheilah Graham that he had. In one of her books she decribed how he flew into a rage when she tried to use of his cups/plates after he'd used it. I don't know what their physical relationship was like, but per Graham FSF insisted she hot-wash any cups, plates, or utensils afer he'd used them, and that she never eat food after he'd eaten off it.

 

If you're interested in more about the sanitarium life of the time, the Maugham film Trio has a section w/ Jean Simmons and Michael Rennie at one, and of course Mann's novel The Magic Mountain is set in one.

 

I always kind of thought sanatoriums were for those addicted or insane......speaking of which.....are there still insane asylums in this country?  I don't recall hearing of either for years except in classic movies.

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My Grandmother spent some time in a "sanitorium" for TB back in about 1930 near Pittsburgh.  The story of how and why she "snuck out" of it is a long one, so I'll skip it.

 

But she managed to live to age 86, and her death had nothing to do with tuberculosis.  Anyway, the best I could find on this was this:

 

 

san·a·to·ri·um

(san'ă-tō'rē-ŭm), In modern usage this word is virtually synonymous with sanitarium.

An institution for the treatment of chronic disorders and a place for recuperation under medical supervision. Compare: sanitarium.
[Mod. L. neuter of sanatorius, curative, fr. sano, to cure, heal]
 
Notice, it's spelled S-A-N-A-----  instead of S-A-N-I---and the two different spellings are synonymous with each other.
 
It was the general public  that made  sanItArium synonymous with "Insane Asylum" over the years.  Which for decades now have been referred to as "Mental Health Facilities".  And sadly, to save money, many state run institutions for mental health have closed down, and the "residents" turned out into the streets to be folded in with much of the homeless.  At least, here in Michigan.
 
I've not seen the movie to which you refer however.  Sounds interesting though.
 
 
Sepiatone
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And sadly, to save money, many state run institutions for mental health have closed down, and the "residents" turned out into the streets to be folded in with much of the homeless.

 

And even worse, many end up in prison. 

 

For those coherent enough who admit they are suicidal, all that's available for them is a psychiatric ward in a local hospital. It's one or two floors. Same with the last major city I lived in.

 

But substance abuse/addiction rehabs are everywhere and mostly privately run, but likely government subsidized. I think the Salvation Army & Goodwill both treat addiction with support free for those who want it.

 

We have an old TB hospital on the outskirts of town, built high up on the crest of a high hill. Guess the goal was for "the germs" to rise up into the atmosphere where they couldn't infect the general population. So yes, TB was a highly contagious condition. That TB asylum is now a general hospital.

(and MrTiki reports there are inmates with TB, it's still around)

 

Remember in NOW VOYAGER, Charlotte Vale was sent to THE CASCADES to recuperate from her "nervous breakdown". There were many living there in different levels of rehabilitation, even teens, as in the charactor Christina Devoux.

You saw nurses attending people resting on the lawn, seemingly a "resort" for those needing "rest" from every day life.

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It's odd though, as contagious TB is supposed to be, and that my Grandmother "snuck out" before her treatment was completed, that nobody else in the family contracted it.

 

I do also remember that back in the "day", whenever anyone could get a job in a resaraunt or diner, even kids who were just trying to get a job as a dishwasher in some diner, we had to go somewhere to get a "food handler's card" and you didn't get it until you took, and passed a TB test.  That little "bulge" of something they put in your forearm that they'd check out a few days later.  I also remember them going around to schools administering those tests back in the mid '60's.

 

 

Sepiatone

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And sadly, to save money, many state run institutions for mental health have closed down, and the "residents" turned out into the streets to be folded in with much of the homeless.

 

And even worse, many end up in prison. 

 

For those coherent enough who admit they are suicidal, all that's available for them is a psychiatric ward in a local hospital. It's one or two floors. Same with the last major city I lived in.

 

But substance abuse/addiction rehabs are everywhere and mostly privately run, but likely government subsidized. I think the Salvation Army & Goodwill both treat addiction with support free for those who want it.

 

We have an old TB hospital on the outskirts of town, built high up on the crest of a high hill. Guess the goal was for "the germs" to rise up into the atmosphere where they couldn't infect the general population. So yes, TB was a highly contagious condition. That TB asylum is now a general hospital.

(and MrTiki reports there are inmates with TB, it's still around)

 

Remember in NOW VOYAGER, Charlotte Vale was sent to THE CASCADES to recuperate from her "nervous breakdown". There were many living there in different levels of rehabilitation, even teens, as in the charactor Christina Devoux.

You saw nurses attending people resting on the lawn, seemingly a "resort" for those needing "rest" from every day life.

 

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And sadly, to save money, many state run institutions for mental health have closed down, and the "residents" turned out into the streets to be folded in with much of the homeless.

 

And even worse, many end up in prison. 

 

For those coherent enough who admit they are suicidal, all that's available for them is a psychiatric ward in a local hospital. It's one or two floors. Same with the last major city I lived in.

 

But substance abuse/addiction rehabs are everywhere and mostly privately run, but likely government subsidized. I think the Salvation Army & Goodwill both treat addiction with support free for those who want it.

 

We have an old TB hospital on the outskirts of town, built high up on the crest of a high hill. Guess the goal was for "the germs" to rise up into the atmosphere where they couldn't infect the general population. So yes, TB was a highly contagious condition. That TB asylum is now a general hospital.

(and MrTiki reports there are inmates with TB, it's still around)

 

Remember in NOW VOYAGER, Charlotte Vale was sent to THE CASCADES to recuperate from her "nervous breakdown". There were many living there in different levels of rehabilitation, even teens, as in the charactor Christina Devoux.

You saw nurses attending people resting on the lawn, seemingly a "resort" for those needing "rest" from every day life.

 

 

 

 

Speaking of "nervous breakdown" that's another term than seems to have disappeared from American lexicon.....that was widely used years ago.  What is the euphemism for it in these times, anyone know?

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It's odd though, as contagious TB is supposed to be, and that my Grandmother "snuck out" before her treatment was completed, that nobody else in the family contracted it.

 

I do also remember that back in the "day", whenever anyone could get a job in a resaraunt or diner, even kids who were just trying to get a job as a dishwasher in some diner, we had to go somewhere to get a "food handler's card" and you didn't get it until you took, and passed a TB test.  That little "bulge" of something they put in your forearm that they'd check out a few days later.  I also remember them going around to schools administering those tests back in the mid '60's.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

I retired from the military recently and as recently as 2010 I know, whenever we deployed to foreign countries we had to have the "TB time" inoculation prior to leaving.

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Speaking of "nervous breakdown" that's another term than seems to have disappeared from American lexicon.....that was widely used years ago.  What is the euphemism for it in these times, anyone know?

I'm not sure.  I suppose "burn-out" comes close.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'm not sure.  I suppose "burn-out" comes close.

 

How about "going Postal"?

 

 

I dunno....

 

"Going postal"  is more of an "explosion" of built up rage.

 

A "nervous breakdown"  is more of an emotional "implosion".

 

 

Sepiatone

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And sadly, to save money, many state run institutions for mental health have closed down, and the "residents" turned out into the streets to be folded in with much of the homeless. At least, here in Michigan.

There was also the problem of people using psychiatry as a weapon against undesirables. This was especially true in places like the Soviet Union, but even some classic films like Suddenly Last Summer deal with the topic.

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Speaking of "nervous breakdown" that's another term than seems to have disappeared from American lexicon.....that was widely used years ago.  What is the euphemism for it in these times, anyone know?

Today the condition is called "being triggered." It is a rather common condition, occurring whenever someone is forced to consider a viewpoint different from their own. Sadly, there is neither a cure nor a treatment, and these people are doomed to spent the rest of their lives in universities (which, oddly enough, is what we used to call insane asylums).

 

Signed:  a former university professor

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Today the condition is called "being triggered." It is a rather common condition, occurring whenever someone is forced to consider a viewpoint different from their own. Sadly, there is neither a cure nor a treatment, and these people are doomed to spent the rest of their lives in universities (which, oddly enough, is what we used to call insane asylums).

 

Signed:  a former university professor

 

Giving it some thought, I suppose another euphanism for "nervous breakdown"  might be "Shutting down".

 

"Being triggered" would seem to be more like what people these days call a "Meltdown".

 

And a lot of THOSE guys wind up on MESSAGE BOARDS.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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Speaking of "nervous breakdown" that's another term than seems to have disappeared from American lexicon.....that was widely used years ago.  What is the euphemism for it in these times, anyone know?

 

The clinical term is "psychotic break". I would much rather tell people I suffered from a nervous breakdown, but I don't have a say in the DSM.

Also, "trigger" and "being triggered" are legitimate mental health terms. As so happens they have been co-opted by pop culture and twisted to the point that using them therapeutically can be confusing and actually counterproductive.

Tasteful or not, right or wrong, the mental health lexicon has long been a source of bastardized references used for comic or deleterious effect.

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