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Thanks, TCM, for In the Mood for Love


slaytonf
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I know there are people who will complain about how awful it is TCM showed this movie, one from the 2000s (!), in color (!!), and. . . foreign (!!!).  They want to turn TCM into an exclusively studio-era Hollywood-based channel.  But I'm glad TCM is being faithful to its origins and brining us great movies like this.  First, In the Mood is a gorgeous movie.  It's no wonder it won awards for cinematography.  Doesn't appear to be shot in Technicolor.  Guess it wasn't around by then.  Well, if this is what movies can look like without Technicolor, I have hope for the future of humanity.  

 

And it was good to pair it with Brief Encounter (1945).  I didn't realize it was at first.  I was thinking pretty highly of myself, recognizing the resonances with it, when I looked at the sked to get info on it and. . . there Brief Encounter was, showing right afterward.  It's interesting to compare the two.  You start thinking of the morality and mores back then, and those of today.  And then you realize In the Mood takes place back then, or closer to it than today.  But then movies are always about the time they are made in, not the time they depict, and were the mores and morals of the time really them, or do we just get the sanctioned orthodoxy in Brief Encounter, while the reality back then was the same as it is today, only we're just more honest and open about it?  Oh, maybe, I guess, only I wasn't alive back then, or not old enough to be aware.  It's just at the end of Brief Encounter, I don't feel bad for Laura Jensen, or that she cheated herself or anyone else.  Maybe I have some pangs for Dr. Harvey, but perhaps he can fix it up with his wife.  All in all, a wonderfully melancholy rumination on the meaning of fidelity.

 

But at the end of In the Mood for Love, I feel a tremendous regret at the failure of Li-zhen and Mo-wan to get together.  All the more pitiful when it seems their marriages are both over by the end of the movie.

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It was indeed a beautiful film. I liked the use of slow motion to move the story along, but it started to slow toward the middle for me and my PST timezone, and next thing I knew Brief Encounter was airing ( which is one of my very favorites!) I hope they show it again when the effects of sleepiness don't overtake me.  * I never DVR films- I just never get around to watching them.*

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   It's interesting to compare the two.  You start thinking of the morality and mores back then, and those of today.  And then you realize In the Mood takes place back then, or closer to it than today.  But then movies are always about the time they are made in, not the time they depict, and were the mores and morals of the time really them, or do we just get the sanctioned orthodoxy in Brief Encounter, while the reality back then was the same as it is today, only we're just more honest and open about it?  Oh, maybe, I guess, only I wasn't alive back then, or not old enough to be aware.  It's just at the end of Brief Encounter, I don't feel bad for Laura Jensen, or that she cheated herself or anyone else.  Maybe I have some pangs for Dr. Harvey, but perhaps he can fix it up with his wife.  All in all, a wonderfully melancholy rumination on the meaning of fidelity.

 

 

I wonder if the morals have really changed that much, or is it that classic Hollywood didn't really tell it like it was. I know extra marital affairs and having children out of wedlock was looked down upon, but did that equate to stricter morals, or did it merely mean you were more secretive about it ?(such as Loretta Young disappearing for 7 months, then returning with an adopted child)

I so much liked the character of Fred Jesson that I hated Laura for wanting to cheat on him the first time I saw the film!!

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I know there are people who will complain about how awful it is TCM showed this movie, one from the 2000s (!), in color (!!), and. . . foreign (!!!).  They want to turn TCM into an exclusively studio-era Hollywood-based channel. 

 

I have that one on DVD and I consider it as much a "Hollywood" film as any of the old stuff. What impresses me the most is its use of bright colors. There are plenty of films since the 1990s that definitely belong on TCM, including most of the Merchant Ivory productions that blend in well with the woodwork (continuing where David Lean left off).

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Simply Beautiful movie that I saw in France nearly 20 years ago. At the time all Europe was abuzz with this fantastic love story.

 

I still intend to buy that Nat King Cole record, Quizás.

 

You really have to see this on a large screen with that music coming out--it almost makes you feel like you're part of this beautiful sad drama.

 

What I love most about it was the Technicolor-- it seemed almost as a sad character.

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