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Oscars by the Numbers--No, Letters


slaytonf
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And here I was thinking all these years that there were twenty-six letters in the alphabet.  What are those two that come after 'z' again?  Oh, I see, there isn't a letter per day.  Wonder why. . . .maybe they couldn't find enough movies for some letters.  That shouldn't be a problem for TCM, they could just repeat the movies they have to fill it out.  Wouldn't mind seeing Jaws twelve times.  So let's see what they got--there's always some gold in the sand.

 

And right off the bat, almost, it's Blazing Saddles (1974)!  'Bout time, too.  Too late for me, though.  I've already bought the DVD.  Maybe Young Frankenstein is the more popular of Mel Brooks' great ones, but I think you have to say this is his most important work, as it does more than just brilliantly spoof a genre.  It attacks a social evil head on and in a revolutionary--yes, revolutionary way.

 

I saw Deliverance (1972) a long time ago.  I remember liking it.  Don't know if I will now.  There's some kind of morality play going on in it, the apparently strong showing its weakness, or hollowing out, and the supposedly weak (read artistic) revealing its strength, or becoming strong through adversity.  A passing of the scepter.  I may remember it wrong.

 

The Four Days of Naples (1962) has aired before, but it's worth watching again.  It's a good action movie demonstrating how the Italians were innocent participants in the Axis, and the Germans were the true villains of WWII.

 

Hey!  Gone With the Wind (1939)!  Just joking.

 

I don't think The Green Goddess (1930) is new, or very good, but I'll watch George Arliss in anything.

 

La Ronde (1950) has been on before, but bears watching any number of times.  It's one of those witty, worldly sex comedies you got before you could show bare breasts.

 

Mon Oncle D'Amerique (1980) is also not new, but a little philosophical meditation on morality from Alain Resnais is like a palette-cleanser for life.

 

The Ruling Class (1972) is a comic satire demonstrating how you'd better not disturb the delicate flower of innocent wonder or you will awake the evil demon of amoral cynicism.

 

And oh boy! what a way to end the month!  That Man From Rio (1964)!  This is a terrific action/adventure movie about a French soldier on a week's leave, who goes to Paris to visit his sweetie, only she get's kidnapped, because she's the daughter of an archeologist who found something in South America on a dig that has something important about it, and he goes off following the kidnappers, and it gets complicated after that.  Stars Françoise Dorléac and Jean-Paul Belmondo in what must have been the most physically demanding role for any actor, anytime.

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Martin Scorsese monthly column in Now Playing pointed out that there are no films starting with "E" in the lineup. Weird.

EERIE, I'd say.

 

Nope Rich, I don't think that movie about that canal and starring Johnny Mack Brown, Joe E. Brown, Anna May Wong and Rex the Wonder Horse was in the lineup either.

 

(...oh...wait...you spelled that with two "E"s here didn't ya...sorry...never mind then)

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Ok...I have to admit it...I am in love with the ABC's of the Oscar movies.  Great idea, easy to follow and easy to schedule.  However one more thing I would like to see (from the group of never satisfied) is on the intermission posting of the next three movies it would be helpful to have what the award was for...is it a nomination and then for what...is it a winner and for what.  Helps me from accessing my numerous movie dictionaries to figure it out. 

 

Now for the reason...I like to look at the film from the perspective of which award it won or was nominated for so I am able to evaluate the film from that perspective....Cedric Gibbons for art...OK then I'll pay attentions to the sets, the montages and other items requiring an art director's deft touch.  Do you understand my perspective from this point of view...music then I'll listen to the score....costumes then I'll pay attention to that aspect of the film. If this is too studious for many of you I'm sorry. 

 

Just finished books on Wilder and Curtiz so am looking forward to their films and have my Ford and Wyler books on standby as well as my David Thomson and Leonard Maltin.  Now I know the schedule has all the particulars but who wants to sit down to watch a movie and access their computer.  Not me..its my Coke and another little habit I won't divulge.  Thanks for letting me whinge.

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Martin Scorsese monthly column in Now Playing pointed out that there are no films starting with "E" in the lineup. Weird.

 

That's because "The Elephant Man" was Paramount, "E.T." and "Erin Brockovich" were Universal, "The English Patient" was Miramax, and "Elizabeth" was independent, but no Elmer Gantry??

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That's because "The Elephant Man" was Paramount, "E.T." and "Erin Brockovich" were Universal, "The English Patient" was Miramax, and "Elizabeth" was independent, but no Elmer Gantry??

 

Or they could have taken poetic license.

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Elizabeth and Essex: The Private Lives of

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Now for the reason...I like to look at the film from the perspective of which award it won or was nominated for so I am able to evaluate the film from that perspective....Cedric Gibbons for art...OK then I'll pay attentions to the sets, the montages and other items requiring an art director's deft touch.  Do you understand my perspective from this point of view...music then I'll listen to the score....costumes then I'll pay attention to that aspect of the film. If this is too studious for many of you I'm sorry. 

 

If you want to go to the trouble, the IMDB page for movies lists nominations and wins for almost every conceivable award.

 

That's because "The Elephant Man" was Paramount, "E.T." and "Erin Brockovich" were Universal, "The English Patient" was Miramax, and "Elizabeth" was independent, but no Elmer Gantry??

 

 

The Elephant Man, and The English Patient have been shown on TCM.  More than once, I think.

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It was an "A" day yesterday and I really enjoyed all the selections, best of all American in Paris.  My absolutely favourite routine is Georges Guetary.  His one number is terrific and I get tingles everytime I see it.  There were two other numbers of his in the show but they were deleted for continuity reasons and time.  I wish I could find them 

 

When I want to cheer myself up..I just go to You Tube and take the "Stairway to Paradise" and it makes my day. 

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