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I like the film too, misswonderly3, and was surprised not to find any new discussions about it either last night or this morning.

Perhaps it doesn't have the classic noir structure (and no femme fetale), but neither did PARTY GIRL.

I thought Young was very good, too. She was especially good in the scene where Eddie G and her father were showing her the Holocaust film. She was nervous and defensive, and nearly jumped out of her seat when the filmstrip reel ended and made a loud sound.

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I did watch the film... err... parts of it.  I kind of fell asleep.  Not the movie's fault, but I made the mistake of lying down on the couch and I was a goner.  I will need to re-watch it and then give a more informed opinion.  I have seen it before, quite some time ago, and I found the movie boring.  However, I was enjoying the first part of the film until I fell asleep.  I also saw the end of the film and found it interesting.  I just missed the middle. 

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56 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

in fact I don't care all that much for either Nazi or Commie based Noirs for some reason.

I don't really care for them when the main noir character is a Nazi or Commie like in The Stranger.   Instead I like some of these film when the main character is a more typical noir figure;  someone that operates on edge of darkness (e.g. is a criminal) but is still an overall decent person in that they wouldn't sell out their country for a buck.  E.g.  The Richard Widmark character (and Jean Peters and Thelma Ritters) in Pick-Up on South Street.

In Nazi or Commie noirs they are just really evil people and when too much of the plot is focused on them,  I find it less compelling.    As already noted in The Stranger the most interesting aspect is how the wife (Young),  deals with what is unfolding. 

 

   

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25 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Pickup on South Street is excellent, one of my favorites, but the Commie character there is actually pretty minor.

I'm also a big fan of Pickup.   (clearly my favorite Nazi\Commie noir).

I believe we have a very similar POV here but I would have said 'because the Commie character is actually pretty minor'.

 

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I've seen it a ton of times before and watched it last night mainly because I haven't seen

it in years. Loretta's character is too hysterical to take seriously. She always seems to

be on the edge of a nervous breakdown. The main story of Eddie unmasking Welles as

a Nazi is fairly interesting and done with some nice touches, but it's rather predictable.

What I most enjoy about the movie is the small town setting and especially the character

of Potter, the owner of the general store. Hey let's open up that little man's suitcase, shall

we? I just need a witness. Thanks. And when he puts on his eye shade during an especailly

tough game of checkers. Hilarious. One minor point is how the heck did the little Nazi guy

manage to knock out Eddie with just one lucky swing of that gym equipment. Hmmm. 

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7 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I've seen it a ton of times before and watched it last night mainly because I haven't seen

it in years. Loretta's character is too hysterical to take seriously. She always seems to

be on the edge of a nervous breakdown. The main story of Eddie unmasking Welles as

a Nazi is fairly interesting and done with some nice touches, but it's rather predictable.

What I most enjoy about the movie is the small town setting and especially the character

of Potter, the owner of the general store. Hey let's open up that little man's suitcase, shall

we? I just need a witness. Thanks. And when he puts on his eye shade during an especailly

tough game of checkers. Hilarious. One minor point is how the heck did the little Nazi guy

manage to knock out Eddie with just one lucky swing of that gym equipment. Hmmm. 

Just one of the many "suspensions of disbelief" one must facilitate in order to appreciate this movie, I would say.

Others being:

1-Eddie is knocked out by that gym ring(as Vautrin here noted), but not only for a few minutes but for hours, as he awakens hours later and after the wedding.

2-Eddie then, and even after suffering this head injury which is later said to result in a knot on his head the size of a golf ball, then calmly indulges in a game of checkers with the store owner after purchasing a bottle of aspirin.

3-After Eddie calls D.C. and tells his department associate he doesn't think Welles is his guy, he suddenly awakes from his sleep that night remembering that Welles says during the evenings dinner party that "Marx was not German, but was a Jew'. One would think that THAT would have immediately registered with him that Welles very well might be the Nazi he's looking for.

4-This whole story takes place just a year after the end of WWII, and so how did Welles manage after fleeing Europe so shortly after the fall of Nazi Germany and to become not only employed as a member of the faculty of that boy's school, but also to become a respected member of the local community AND to woo and then wed who appears to be the most eligible bachelorette in town? And all this without, IMHO, being a particularly personable or even attractive sort.

(...still though, and even with these observations of mine, I, and like MissW here, found myself enjoying this film a little more than I remember previously enjoying it the first two times I'd watched it)  

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9 hours ago, Vautrin said:
9 hours ago, Vautrin said:

 Loretta's character is too hysterical to take seriously. She always seems to be on the edge of a nervous breakdown.

I think that's what makes her performance good. She's trying to hide her gradual discovery of who her husband really is while also trying to convince herself and those trying to enlighten her that he isn't the man they are looking for.

 

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have to use voice transcription to write most everything, and it kind of reminds me a little bit of Gilda Radners “Emily Litella” character from Saturday night live who always heard things incorrectly.

(Like when President Reagan wanted to make Puerto Rico a steak.)

That was a good one.   :D  and too, I liked when she was up in arms over "All this fuss about "flea erections"  in China, and "Endangered f e c e s! "   :D

Back to noir stuff....

MOVIES! channel shows noir films on weekend nights, like Saturday or Sunday( I can't recall the specific night they feature them) and though they DO cut up with commercials, you DON'T get some raspy voiced wag droning on about the film or the ERA like some sort of "expert".  ;)

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

That was a good one.   :D  and too, I liked when she was up in arms over "All this fuss about "flea erections"  in China, and "Endangered f e c e s! "   :D

Back to noir stuff....

MOVIES! channel shows noir films on weekend nights, like Saturday or Sunday( I can't recall the specific night they feature them) and though they DO cut up with commercials, you DON'T get some raspy voiced wag droning on about the film or the ERA like some sort of "expert".  ;)

Sepiatone

We no longer get Movies! channel as the local broadcaster replaced it with another network.

Regardless, when we did have it, the commercials were long and frequent.  Even recording the movies and fast forwarding through them was very disruptive to the flow of the movie.  Not to mention whatever editing they did to permit more commercial time.

Whereas, on TCM you can mute the "wag" until the movie starts and afterwards.  Then ZERO interruptions.  While I may not listen to the presenters, I do occasionally and usually find their information quite informative.  Incidentally, this thread is about Noir Alley, but I assume you are not including Eddie Mueller as one of the "wags."

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1 hour ago, TheCid said:

We no longer get Movies! channel as the local broadcaster replaced it with another network.

Regardless, when we did have it, the commercials were long and frequent.  Even recording the movies and fast forwarding through them was very disruptive to the flow of the movie.  Not to mention whatever editing they did to permit more commercial time.

Whereas, on TCM you can mute the "wag" until the movie starts and afterwards.  Then ZERO interruptions.  While I may not listen to the presenters, I do occasionally and usually find their information quite informative.  Incidentally, this thread is about Noir Alley, but I assume you are not including Eddie Mueller as one of the "wags."

The Movies-TV network does NOT edit a film for 'more commercial time',  but only to remove content.   This is stated before each movie (e.g. I just saw it yesterday when No Way Out was on).   BUT they sure do edit out content.  E.g. the "n" word in No Way Out (which Richard Widmark said to Sidney Poitier often in this controversial film).

 

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Saw parts of Nightmare Alley on Movies-TV Sunday Noir night (No Way Out was also shown);

QUESTION:   Why does the Power character have to get married to Coleen Gray?   I saw the the bar scene where Blondell and the Strong Man (Mazurki) get all angry and then in the next scene the two are married.

Saw this scene last night and I couldn't recall what lead up to it and why Zea and muscle head were acting like they were Gray's parents!     

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49 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The Movies-TV network does NOT edit a film for 'more commercial time',  but only to remove content.   This is stated before each movie (e.g. I just saw it yesterday when No Way Out was on).   BUT they sure do edit out content.  E.g. the "n" word in No Way Out (which Richard Widmark said to Sidney Poitier often in this controversial film).

 

OK.  Doesn't Movies! TV add run time?  I know some of the other channels will take a 24 minute TV show and then the run time is close to 40 or 45 minutes.

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8 minutes ago, TheCid said:

OK.  Doesn't Movies! TV add run time?  I know some of the other channels will take a 24 minute TV show and then the run time is close to 40 or 45 minutes.

Movies-TV does NOT try to fit movies into pre-determined time frames like 2 hours.   Therefore a film will sometimes start at an odd time (not on the hour or half-hour),   and they also use 'filler' programming (like TCM),   so a film can start on the hour or half-hour.

So yea they add a lot of run time for all the commercials.      

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  15 hours ago, Vautrin said:
  15 hours ago, Vautrin said:

 Loretta's character is too hysterical to take seriously. She always seems to be on the edge of a nervous breakdown.

Sagebrush said:

"I think that's what makes her performance good. She's trying to hide her gradual discovery of who her husband really is while also trying to convince herself and those trying to enlighten her that he isn't the man they are looking for."

I thought this aspect of The Stranger was the most interesting element of the film, and said so. Yes, as Vautrin points out, Loretta's character is "hysterical" and "seems to be on the edge of a nervous breakdown". But I would be too, if I were having to deal with the revelations about my new husband that she's having to deal with.

I think it's kind of in bad taste to quote oneself, but still, I'm going to do it here because what I said in my earlier post about this movie so completely addresses this matter of Mary's emotional "hysteria" :

"The most compelling aspect of this film is her gradual realization that the man she married is a vile Nazi war criminal. And this happens in stages: First, she is told by her husband that the odd little man who came to their home that day she was hanging curtains ( the same day they were married ), was a blackmailer, and that he (Charles Rankin is the name he goes by) paid him off and got rid of him. That in itself is disturbing and unsettling to her, the idea that her adored husband is hiding something. Then, stage two: he admits to her that he in fact murdered this man, claiming that he wanted to spare her and her family from scandal. Get your head around that, Loretta ! 

THEN, as if that's not enough, she's told by her own family  - beloved father and brother, people she absolutely trusts - as well as Eddie G., that the man she married and is in love with is a monstrous Nazi war criminal, responsible for some of the worst atrocities of the Holocaust.  It's these revelations in stages that I find interesting, and Loretta does a really good job of showing her dawning realization of who exactly she's married to in her face. First dismay, then disbelief, then confusion, then horror. And don't forget, these two have just returned from their honeymoon. She has to deal with the fact that she's been physically intimate with a Nazi war criminal. I love the way this is suggested, never openly talked about. But we get a sense of it when Charles, admitting to her that he killed the "little man" who (he falsely claims) was blackmailing him, says something like "Yes, my darling, these very hands that caressed you the night before strangled that little man."   Plus, when she finally recognizes to herself just who her husband is, she tells him to go ahead and kill her, but to do it without touching her  : "Just DON'T PUT YOUR HANDS ON ME ! !"  "

 

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17 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE STRANGER Is one of my favorites, unfortunately I still don’t have cable back since the hurricane and I’m still posting with my phone, which is way tougher than posting on my PC.

Are you back home now? Everything ok?

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17 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I've seen it a ton of times before and watched it last night mainly because I haven't seen

it in years. Loretta's character is too hysterical to take seriously. She always seems to

be on the edge of a nervous breakdown. The main story of Eddie unmasking Welles as

a Nazi is fairly interesting and done with some nice touches, but it's rather predictable.

What I most enjoy about the movie is the small town setting and especially the character

of Potter, the owner of the general store. Hey let's open up that little man's suitcase, shall

we? I just need a witness. Thanks. And when he puts on his eye shade during an especailly

tough game of checkers. Hilarious. One minor point is how the heck did the little Nazi guy

manage to knock out Eddie with just one lucky swing of that gym equipment. Hmmm. 

 

Yeah, that was a lucky break there. A perfect hit!

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I've seen The Stranger a dozen times probably, but watched it again, partly to hear Eddie's comments. The film reminds me in some ways of Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt. Both are set in small towns where nothing very bad could ever happen, but then something does. Someone from the "outside" world who brings with them the evil lurking out there.........

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17 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I've seen it a ton of times before and watched it last night mainly because I haven't seen

it in years. Loretta's character is too hysterical to take seriously. She always seems to

be on the edge of a nervous breakdown. The main story of Eddie unmasking Welles as

a Nazi is fairly interesting and done with some nice touches, but it's rather predictable.

What I most enjoy about the movie is the small town setting and especially the character

of Potter, the owner of the general store. Hey let's open up that little man's suitcase, shall

we? I just need a witness. Thanks. And when he puts on his eye shade during an especailly

tough game of checkers. Hilarious. One minor point is how the heck did the little Nazi guy

manage to knock out Eddie with just one lucky swing of that gym equipment. Hmmm. 

It's funny, Vautrin I've seen that film many times, always enjoy it but only saw the bit in this latest showing where Loretta is dealing with the lady at the house, who drops down as if she is having a heart attack, preventing Loretta from going to the tower. I think I am prejudiced against Loretta, since her hysterics did start making me laugh. I always think she is gorgeous in films, but I'm not the biggest fan of her acting. But all in all, the film is a good one and Welles is always interesting as is Eddie G. so it is still worthy watching.

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40 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I've seen The Stranger a dozen times probably, but watched it again, partly to hear Eddie's comments. The film reminds me in some ways of Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt. Both are set in small towns where nothing very bad could ever happen, but then something does. Someone from the "outside" world who brings with them the evil lurking out there.........

Yes ! Smart girl, Hibi ! I was thinking the very same thing, but didn't want to add to my already very long post about this film.

But yes, I too thought of Shadow of a Doubt while watching The Stranger. As you say, both films have a small town setting, with friendly ( and rather nosy) citizens. Both seem like "nothing very bad could ever happen", but then "something does".  And "someone from outside" brings evil to the little town...

Also: in both films, the protagonist is female. And she's the opposite of a femme fatale, she represents decency and innocence. And each of these protagonists at first utterly loves and trusts the very person who brings evil to their sweet, supposedly safe, home. Both Mary and Charlie realize the terrible nature of their beloved gradually, at first refusing to believe it. And both of them have their lives put in jeopardy when the formerly trusted evil one realizes that the young woman who previously adored him is now on to him.

Of course, there's the difference of Mary's adored trusted villain being her husband, whereas "Charlie"'s is her uncle. So it's kind of worse for Mary, because of what I said earlier about how she has to deal with the fact that she's (presumably) been sexually intimate with this monster.  Although the film does somehow get across the idea that their newly-wed sex life might not be so great....

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