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23 hours ago, Hibi said:

Yeah, the scene is very tightly edited. I may have to pause it......

Plus the guy who shoots Carey is on the edge of the scene. One of the funniest scenes is

when Cook first comes home to Marie and she zings him enough to have a comedy act.

 

 

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46 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Plus the guy who shoots Carey is on the edge of the scene. One of the funniest scenes is

when Cook first comes home to Marie and she zings him enough to have a comedy act.

 

 

Yeah, Marie gets all the good lines in the film....

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Plus the guy who shoots Carey is on the edge of the scene. One of the funniest scenes is

when Cook first comes home to Marie and she zings him enough to have a comedy act.

 

 

That is one un-intentional funny scene.    The only one I can like of where the Cook character gets picked on more,  with jokes that are very demeaning,  is by Spade in 1941's,  The Maltese Falcon.  

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

That is one un-intentional funny scene.    The only one I can like of where the Cook character gets picked on more,  with jokes that are very demeaning,  is by Spade in 1941's,  The Maltese Falcon.  

That is the example that comes to mind first, and besides the jokes there is the scene where

Spade grabs Cook when he has his hands in his pockets and delivers him to Greenstreet that

way. Ouch. I'm sure there are other examples, as Cook so often played a loser who practically

had demean me written on his forehead. 

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

That is one un-intentional funny scene.    The only one I can like of where the Cook character gets picked on more,  with jokes that are very demeaning,  is by Spade in 1941's,  The Maltese Falcon.  

Oh, I dunno, James.

I always thought Jack Palance did a pretty good job of pickin' on poor ol' Elisha on this one muddy old west town street in a particular Western of note.

(...guess you forgot about that one, eh?!) ;)

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18 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Did you see the Manhattan car chase at least? It's one that rivals the one in Bullit.

Yes.  I stopped watching right after the chase scene.  It was magnificent.  I thought that was a good place to stop for a little bit and then come back to it, but by the time I came back it was gone.

And that final scene with Windsor and Cook is just fantastic.  You almost hear sympathy for him in her voice and those final words just sum her up so well.

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13 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Check this out......

Wow!

I'll be buying this....

Poor quality film has long been one of the problems with Detour, even on TCM.  Never have decided whether I like it enough to buy it or not, but this will be in favor of doing so.

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Looney REALLY blew it with CRACK-UP (1946).  Fell asleep several times last night.  Then I woke up early and watched THE BIG HEAT (1953) On Demand before the rebroadcast of Noir Alley.  Then fell asleep at basically the same points during CRACK-UP again. :rolleyes:  Oh well, THE BIG HEAT (1953) was great. :lol:

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The only false note if I remember it right, regarding Crack Up was, in regards to NYC was the trains going into Grand Central Terminal should not have sounded like steam locomotives. 

Yeeeeah CJ, I suppose there's an outside chance that the paunchy and middle-aged Pat O'Brien MIGHT have been able to actually shimmy all the way down that ship's docking rope and onto that pier without falling into the water.

(...maybe?!) ;)

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6 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yeeeeah CJ, I suppose there's an outside chance that the paunchy and middle-aged Pat O'Brien MIGHT have been able to actually shimmy all the way down that ship's docking rope and onto that pier without falling into the water.

(...maybe?!) ;)

Anyway I probably should have elaborated a bit, The New York Central RR began electrifying its lines in and around New York, in 1906 (the railroad was required by the new city ordinance to discontinue use of steam locomotives by July 1, 1908). The correct sound would have been an air horn.

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11 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The only false note if I remember it right, regarding Crack Up was, in regards to NYC was the trains going into Grand Central Terminal should not have sounded like steam locomotives. 

Your later post is correct re: electric locos in NYC.  

Muller did mention at the end that the trains were actually stock footage.  I recognized the one in the opening sequence as being from Narrow Margin.

There was an interesting little short at the end of the movie on Noir.  Robert Mitchum was referred to as the king of Noir (or something like that).

As for Crack Up, I have seen it before and it is OK, but not all that great.  I can see why some may have fallen asleep while watching it.

My favorite O'Brien movie is Having a Wonderful Crime with Carole Landis and George Murphy.  A light and entertaining mystery-comedy.

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9 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yeeeeah CJ, I suppose there's an outside chance that the paunchy and middle-aged Pat O'Brien MIGHT have been able to actually shimmy all the way down that ship's docking rope and onto that pier without falling into the water.

(...maybe?!) ;)

Yeah, and he did it pretty quick too. 

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9 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yeeeeah CJ, I suppose there's an outside chance that the paunchy and middle-aged Pat O'Brien MIGHT have been able to actually shimmy all the way down that ship's docking rope and onto that pier without falling into the water.

(...maybe?!) ;)

Much easier to shimmy down than climb up.

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I'd seen Crack Up once before a few years back on TCM, but had forgotten much of the plot and who the villain was so it was like watching it for the first time. Very dark and very enjoyable. Robert Bray (from Lassie) had a wordless menacing role. Great camera work.

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On 12/2/2018 at 11:50 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

GReat outro by EDDIE today, There are two things I have to chime in with:

I like ROSEANNA MCKOY! 

And FREDERIC BROWN is a pretty interesting writer. I think his best novel, which is still only about 120 pages or so, is THE FAR CRY- recommended highly

Lorna, I've seen Crack-Up a couple of times, but missed the airing on Noir Alley. Which means I missed Eddie's comments. I was curious about whoever "Roseanna Mckoy" is, and looked her up. As far as I can tell, she doesn't have any connection to Crack Up or to film at all. I think I must have missed something, something Eddie must have said about her in his "intro " or "outro" commentaries.

Can you enlighten me please? Who's "Roseanna McKoy" and what does she have to do with the film Crack- Up ?

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On 12/2/2018 at 7:42 AM, TheCid said:

Poor quality film has long been one of the problems with Detour, even on TCM.  Never have decided whether I like it enough to buy it or not, but this will be in favor of doing so.

I've seen Detour a few times. I disliked it the first time I saw it, but wanted to give it another chance, as so many noir fans seem to revere it (notice I didn't say "love" it, as it's not a lovable film...) But with each subsequent viewing, I disliked it as much as ever.

I kind of like my noirs to be "fun" (which is possible ! Sergeant, don't start arguing with me about this, please !), and Detour is one of the least fun noirs I've ever seen. Plus, once those two get stuck in that dingey hotel room, or rented apartment, or whatever it is, it's just such a claustrophobic experience (and yes, I know, "claustrophobia" is often cited as a potential element of film noir.)  I cant' stand the Anne Savage character; Miss Savage herself is very good, it's not her acting I have a problem with. And there are many female characters (I suppose we could call her a "femme fatale") in noir who are nasty and selfish and evil, but I tend to like them; they're entertaining and fun to watch. But Vera's more a harpy than a femme fatale - she's no fun !

...Hey, good thing phones with long cords (or any kind of cord) are now almost obsolete, eh? 

Anyway, sorry to come off as a grouch...Just sayin', I can't get excited about any version of that film, Detour.

"That said", it was comradely and nice of cigarjoe to give us all a heads up about this new release of that film. I'm sure many here appreciated it.

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9 hours ago, Hibi said:

I'd seen Crack Up once before a few years back on TCM, but had forgotten much of the plot and who the villain was so it was like watching it for the first time. Very dark and very enjoyable. Robert Bray (from Lassie) had a wordless role. Great camera work.

Some SPOILERS

I like Crack-Up, too, Hibi. Although Pat O'Brien is not exactly an ideal noir protagonist, he's actually believable in this film. Any anyway, Pat O'Brien: what's not to like? I also enjoyed Herbert Marshall as the villain. Herbert Marshall actually seems to have specialized in playing seeming good guys who turn out, near movie's end, to be bad guys. (As in Foreign Correspondent, for example...)

I thought the semi-romantic relationship between Pat and Clare was kind of sweet, maybe because it was so tentative.

I also liked the whole "world of art" that the film depicted. And that gaming gallery, complete with pinball etc., was fun  - shows that even back then a lot of people had a thing about those kinds of games (well, the 1940s version of them.)

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10 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Some SPOILERS

I like Crack-Up, too, Hibi. Although Pat O'Brien is not exactly an ideal noir protagonist, he's actually believable in this film. Any anyway, Pat O'Brien: what's not to like? I also enjoyed Herbert Marshall as the villain. Herbert Marshall actually seems to have specialized in playing seeming good guys who turn out, near movie's end, to be bad guys. (As in Foreign Correspondent, for example...)

I thought the semi-romantic relationship between Pat and Clare was kind of sweet, maybe because it was so tentative.

I also liked the whole "world of art" that the film depicted. And that gaming gallery, complete with pinball etc., was fun- shows that even back then a lot of people had a thing about those kinds of games (well, the 1940s version of them.)

 

SPOILERS.

 

But Herbert Marshall wasnt a villain. I suspected he was as he often is, but not in this film! I liked the fact that the good girl secretary turned out to be not so good. I'd forgotten that aspect as well.......

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