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I don't watch Noir Alley, but did watch Eddie Muller's in/out description of DOA. Found it on Watch TCM. Also found it is available on the Noir Alley site.

I can understand why people like watching Noir Alley just for Eddie's details.

Look forward to hearing Eddie talk about Key Largo.

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Okay so Looney is checking back in.  I had this elaborate plan to post when the new season started, but then I've been sick all week and didn't feel like doing anything.  Truth be told I haven't watched much TCM since I was denied seeing MURDER MY SWEET (1944) again by the "CONTENT UNAVAILABLE" demon.  Since I did not know that was the end of the NOIR ALLEY Season I was treated to THE L-SHAPED ROOM (1962), which aired in the NOIR ALLEY slot soon after MURDER MY SWEET (1944).  I REALLY loved that movie.  I've always liked Brock Peters work, but I was blown away by Leslie Caron.

Okay, Okay onto D.O.A. (1949)

You are not going to believe this story, but two days prior to seeing this film I saw the 1988 version.  I had no clue the D.O.A. (1949) was the week's NOIR ALLEY offering.  I just found a used DVD 8 pack.  I bought it.  It happened to have the 1988 version and I just happened to decide to watch it.  It was very strange and didn't really hold a candle to the 1949 offering.  Dennis Quaid was possibly a little too unhinged or off the wall or something.  He just didn't seem to fit in this movie -nor did Meg Ryan.  The best qualities from 1988 were Daniel Stern and seeing Jane Kaczmarek in a role that wasn't Lois from MALCOLM IN THE MIDDLE.   My apologies, but after you've seen Lois you can't see there is an actress playing a role. :lol:

So D.O.A. (1949) was definitely one that I got more into as it went along.  I thought O'Brien being over the top and frantic fit the mood.  And what a reason to be murdered, witnessing a signature of someone basically passing by.  OUCH!!!!! It was pretty entertaining.  I likely wouldn't pay much attention to it if I had the chance to see it again, but I enjoyed it for one go-round.

 

Dear Diary - I talk to a person every once in awhile about TCM.  The only issue is he always says "TMC".  Do I correct him?  Do I risk sounding like a snob? :unsure:  I am asking because I already have to correct a lot of what he says and answer a lot of questions he has about all kinds of movies.  I don't think he minds when I answer his questions, but sometimes I feel like telling him "It is TCM not TMC" or even yelling it at him might send the wrong message. :D

D.O.A. (1988) Does have a cool poster . . . 1193604454_D.O.A.1988IMDB.jpg.224dbe65e3ba1f8ed9e15698ed56552a.jpg

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Got my drink, spilled it a bit in my rush and instead of High Sierra and an Eddie Muller intro, I get Dark Passage without the intro. Honestly, I thought Dark Passage was the feature for this week and thought it sounded familiar but couldn't place it. 5 minutes in and you can't see Humphrey Bogart's face and now I remember it and it being on Noir Alley previously, with Eddie commenting on having a big name star and not showing his face for most of the movie. One hell of a stylistic choice.

I don't mind the rewatch, and Hollywood voices back then are the bees knees.

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10 hours ago, Ampersand said:

Got my drink, spilled it a bit in my rush and instead of High Sierra and an Eddie Muller intro, I get Dark Passage without the intro. Honestly, I thought Dark Passage was the feature for this week and thought it sounded familiar but couldn't place it. 5 minutes in and you can't see Humphrey Bogart's face and now I remember it and it being on Noir Alley previously, with Eddie commenting on having a big name star and not showing his face for most of the movie. One hell of a stylistic choice.

I don't mind the rewatch, and Hollywood voices back then are the bees knees.

Interesting. I got HIGH SIERRA on this week's Noir Alley ( in Northern CA.)

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12 hours ago, Ampersand said:

Got my drink, spilled it a bit in my rush and instead of High Sierra and an Eddie Muller intro, I get Dark Passage without the intro. Honestly, I thought Dark Passage was the feature for this week and thought it sounded familiar but couldn't place it. 5 minutes in and you can't see Humphrey Bogart's face and now I remember it and it being on Noir Alley previously, with Eddie commenting on having a big name star and not showing his face for most of the movie. One hell of a stylistic choice.

I don't mind the rewatch, and Hollywood voices back then are the bees knees.

Ampersand, do you live in Canada? Because I got the same thing: High Sierra was scheduled for Noir Alley, but I (a resident of Canada) got Dark Passage. Now, this seems to be starting to happen more often than it used to: I'll see something on the "American " schedule, only to find it's being bumped and replaced with something else on the Canadian one. I was so disappointed the last time this happened, I started a thread about it.

Anyway, if you got Dark Passage instead of High Sierra, if you live in Canada, that would be why. (If you live in the States, I have no idea why it would have happened.) I've seen both films, but I own Dark Passage, so was more interested in High Sierra, which I haven't seen in years. But the main thing I was frustrated about was missing Eddie's commentary on H. S. I always enjoy his commentaries.

However, I do remember a few things about High Sierra:     SPOILERS !

It's an oddly touching story, with the Bogart character desperately trying to escape and getting trapped in the hills like that. And his misplaced interest and sympathy for the Joan Leslie character, when he's got beautiful, intelligent, loyal Ida Lupino right in front of him, is frustrating. But of course misplaced trust is a classic noir trope. I also remember the poor little dog playing a fateful part in the story. The whole film is an intriguing combination of gangster/ on-the-lam/ noir/ and drama. And it's interesting to remember that director Raoul Walsh also brought us, the same year, a quasi-noir, Manpower, and of course, a few years later, the unforgettable White Heat - among other worthy noir titles.

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Okay since I waited all week to post about D.O.A. (1949) I'll go ahead and post my thoughts on HIGH SIERRA (1941) as soon as possible - meaning now.  I am not saying this a a bad movie by any means - but I don't like IT.  :D  It just doesn't sit right with me.  There is absolutely nothing "Bad" about it; I just get annoyed.  Even when you know the twists and turns are coming because they are predictable it punches.  I love Ida Lupino and I think Bogart is great.  I mean the whole cast is good.  I think it just makes you want things to go so differently and then they don't.   I mean I really hate that ending and I guess I am supposed to.  It is like I see the things coming and I'm like "Okay don't do that.  No don't do that.  You're doing it.  Stop doing that.  Don't turn there.  Park there and hide.  No stay on the bus and keep going.  Don't go to that scene.  No quit that.  Don't talk to that reporter.  Get away from that scene. AND LOSE THE DOG ALREADY!!!!!" :lol:

So it isn't that I don't think it is a brilliant film; it just isn't my favorite Bogart movie with the word "Sierra" in the title - though I admit I often repeat many of the same statements from above while I am watching that movie. ;)

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18 hours ago, Looney said:

Okay so Looney is checking back in.  I had this elaborate plan to post when the new season started, but then I've been sick all week and didn't feel like doing anything.  Truth be told I haven't watched much TCM since I was denied seeing MURDER MY SWEET (1944) again by the "CONTENT UNAVAILABLE" demon.  Since I did not know that was the end of the NOIR ALLEY Season I was treated to THE L-SHAPED ROOM (1962), which aired in the NOIR ALLEY slot soon after MURDER MY SWEET (1944).  I REALLY loved that movie.  I've always liked Brock Peters work, but I was blown away by Leslie Caron.

Okay, Okay onto D.O.A. (1949)

You are not going to believe this story, but two days prior to seeing this film I saw the 1988 version.  I had no clue the D.O.A. (1949) was the week's NOIR ALLEY offering.  I just found a used DVD 8 pack.  I bought it.  It happened to have the 1988 version and I just happened to decide to watch it.  It was very strange and didn't really hold a candle to the 1949 offering.  Dennis Quaid was possibly a little too unhinged or off the wall or something.  He just didn't seem to fit in this movie -nor did Meg Ryan.  The best qualities from 1988 were Daniel Stern and seeing Jane Kaczmarek in a role that wasn't Lois from MALCOLM IN THE MIDDLE.   My apologies, but after you've seen Lois you can't see there is an actress playing a role. :lol:

So D.O.A. (1949) was definitely one that I got more into as it went along.  I thought O'Brien being over the top and frantic fit the mood.  And what a reason to be murdered, witnessing a signature of someone basically passing by.  OUCH!!!!! It was pretty entertaining.  I likely wouldn't pay much attention to it if I had the chance to see it again, but I enjoyed it for one go-round.

 

Dear Diary - I talk to a person every once in awhile about TCM.  The only issue is he always says "TMC".  Do I correct him?  Do I risk sounding like a snob? :unsure:  I am asking because I already have to correct a lot of what he says and answer a lot of questions he has about all kinds of movies.  I don't think he minds when I answer his questions, but sometimes I feel like telling him "It is TCM not TMC" or even yelling it at him might send the wrong message. :D

D.O.A. (1988) Does have a cool poster . . . 1193604454_D.O.A.1988IMDB.jpg.224dbe65e3ba1f8ed9e15698ed56552a.jpg

The 1988 version wasn't that good at all.

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Not that it makes much of a difference, but I've always considered High Sierra to be a

typical gangster flick, though with a better script and more depth than most, and not

a noir. Now if Bogie had shot the dog and kicked the crippled girl, well...

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10 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Ampersand, do you live in Canada? Because I got the same thing: High Sierra was scheduled for Noir Alley, but I (a resident of Canada) got Dark Passage. Now, this seems to be starting to happen more often than it used to: I'll see something on the "American " schedule, only to find it's being bumped and replaced with something else on the Canadian one. I was so disappointed the last time this happened, I started a thread about it.

Anyway, if you got Dark Passage instead of High Sierra, if you live in Canada, that would be why. (If you live in the States, I have no idea why it would have happened.) I've seen both films, but I own Dark Passage, so was more interested in High Sierra, which I haven't seen in years. But the main thing I was frustrated about was missing Eddie's commentary on H. S. I always enjoy his commentaries.

However, I do remember a few things about High Sierra:     SPOILERS !

It's an oddly touching story, with the Bogart character desperately trying to escape and getting trapped in the hills like that. And his misplaced interest and sympathy for the Joan Leslie character, when he's got beautiful, intelligent, loyal Ida Lupino right in front of him, is frustrating. But of course misplaced trust is a classic noir trope. I also remember the poor little dog playing a fateful part in the story. The whole film is an intriguing combination of gangster/ on-the-lam/ noir/ and drama. And it's interesting to remember that director Raoul Walsh also brought us, the same year, a quasi-noir, Manpower, and of course, a few years later, the unforgettable White Heat - among other worthy noir titles.

I do, I remember it happening last year where Canada got a noir about a land with an oil well and some confrontation about it. But I guess when you show as many noirs as Noir Alley does, you'll eventually have to show some that are only in the US to keep it fresh. And his comments before and after the movie are why I'm always on time for the midnight showing, or catching the 10 AM showing if I missed it.

Read the spoilers and I'm glad High Sierra reminds me of Dark Passage a bit, almost like keeping some of the themes in making the alternative pick for Canada. I haven't seen Manpower but I'm game for anything Edward G. Robinson, double for Larceny Inc. coming up at the end of the month. White Heat, absolutely legendary.

 

9 hours ago, Michael Rennie said:

Try this link for Eddie's comments:

http://noiralley.tcm.com/video-archive

 

Thank you very much! Didn't know about the video archive and hearing the commentary I missed out on made my day.

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17 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Not that it makes much of a difference, but I've always considered High Sierra to be a

typical gangster flick, though with a better script and more depth than most, and not

a noir. Now if Bogie had shot the dog and kicked the crippled girl, well...

LOL. I skipped watching it this go-round. I've seen it enough.

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13 hours ago, Ampersand said:

I I haven't seen Manpower but I'm game for anything Edward G. Robinson,

MANPOWER is a TERRIBLE MOVIE, but, one that I recommend seeing as a real artifact of its time.

ROBINSON and MARLENE DIETRICH (who both deserve SO MUCH BETTER than the script gives them to work with) costar with GEORGE RAFT (who doesn't) in a movie about a love triangle between a wicked woman and two emergency power line workers (this was back in the days when it was apparently a really really risky business making sure lines worked after a storm or disaster.)

ROBINSON is the "bad guy" and RAFT is the "good guy"- who HITS Marlene Dietrich's character (hard and in the face) at least once (as i recall)  and it is treated like a great thing in the movie.

They don't show it on TCM a lot, but they do still show it from time to time

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59 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

MANPOWER is a TERRIBLE MOVIE, but, one that I recommend seeing as a real artifact of its time.

ROBINSON and MARLENE DIETRICH (who both deserve SO MUCH BETTER than the script gives them to work with) costar with GEORGE RAFT (who doesn't) in a movie about a love triangle between a wicked woman and two emergency power line workers (this was back in the days when it was apparently a really really risky business making sure lines worked after a storm or disaster.)

ROBINSON is the "bad guy" and RAFT is the "good guy"- who HITS Marlene Dietrich's character (hard and in the face) at least once (as i recall)  and it is treated like a great thing in the movie.

They don't show it on TCM a lot, but they do still show it from time to time

I wouldn't say its TEHWIBBLE (as Marlene would say) One of those so bad, it's good movies! From what I've read Raft and Eddie came to blows over Marlene on the set! (Marlene could do that)

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7 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I wouldn't say its TEHWIBBLE (as Marlene would say) One of those so bad, it's good movies! From what I've read Raft and Eddie came to blows over Marlene on the set! (Marlene could do that)

From the IMDb trivia section for the film Some Like It Hot:

The Nehemiah Persoff role originally was offered to Edward G. Robinson, but Robinson had vowed never again to work with George Raft, with whom he had a fist fight on the set of Manpower (1941) when for a scene Raft spun him around too hard. (Despite the avowal, Robinson did co-star with Raft in A Bullet for Joey (1955)) However, the role of Johnny Paradise, the kid homaging Raft's "cheap trick" of coin-flipping, is also the man with the Tommy gun in the birthday cake who mows down Spats and his gang. The actor is Edward G. Robinson Jr.

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14 hours ago, Ampersand said:

Thank you very much! Didn't know about the video archive and hearing the commentary I missed out on made my day.

Cool! Interesting how Eddie's comments are so well regarded. That says a lot for his talents. I watched the DOA comments from Eddie on my tablet. The screen was dark and I had to raise the volume rather high. I think the lighting around Eddie, or the lack of it, is intentional and interesting.

More and more people on this forum seem to call Canada home. TCM may want to step up their game with movie rights. Or they can continue to ruffle feathers. 

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33 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I wouldn't say its TEHWIBBLE (as Marlene would say) One of those so bad, it's good movies! From what I've read Raft and Eddie came to blows over Marlene on the set! (Marlene could do that)

(good one!)

I think it was just the FORCE with which he slaps MARLENE and the fact that the makers clearly think this is a good thing that REALLY APPALLED ME (and God knows how many impressionable young viewers in 1941 walked out with the impression that slapping a woman was a good, manly, heroic thing.)

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On 3/16/2019 at 10:42 PM, Looney said:

Okay so Looney is checking back in.  I had this elaborate plan to post when the new season started, but then I've been sick all week and didn't feel like doing anything.  Truth be told I haven't watched much TCM since I was denied seeing MURDER MY SWEET (1944) again by the "CONTENT UNAVAILABLE" demon.  Since I did not know that was the end of the NOIR ALLEY Season I was treated to THE L-SHAPED ROOM (1962), which aired in the NOIR ALLEY slot soon after MURDER MY SWEET (1944).  I REALLY loved that movie.  I've always liked Brock Peters work, but I was blown away by Leslie Caron.

Okay, Okay onto D.O.A. (1949)

You are not going to believe this story, but two days prior to seeing this film I saw the 1988 version.  I had no clue the D.O.A. (1949) was the week's NOIR ALLEY offering.  I just found a used DVD 8 pack.  I bought it.  It happened to have the 1988 version and I just happened to decide to watch it.  It was very strange and didn't really hold a candle to the 1949 offering.  Dennis Quaid was possibly a little too unhinged or off the wall or something.  He just didn't seem to fit in this movie -nor did Meg Ryan.  The best qualities from 1988 were Daniel Stern and seeing Jane Kaczmarek in a role that wasn't Lois from MALCOLM IN THE MIDDLE.   My apologies, but after you've seen Lois you can't see there is an actress playing a role. :lol:

So D.O.A. (1949) was definitely one that I got more into as it went along.  I thought O'Brien being over the top and frantic fit the mood.  And what a reason to be murdered, witnessing a signature of someone basically passing by.  OUCH!!!!! It was pretty entertaining.  I likely wouldn't pay much attention to it if I had the chance to see it again, but I enjoyed it for one go-round.

 

Dear Diary - I talk to a person every once in awhile about TCM.  The only issue is he always says "TMC".  Do I correct him?  Do I risk sounding like a snob? :unsure:  I am asking because I already have to correct a lot of what he says and answer a lot of questions he has about all kinds of movies.  I don't think he minds when I answer his questions, but sometimes I feel like telling him "It is TCM not TMC" or even yelling it at him might send the wrong message. :D

D.O.A. (1988) Does have a cool poster . . . 1193604454_D.O.A.1988IMDB.jpg.224dbe65e3ba1f8ed9e15698ed56552a.jpg

Yes, I would correct him with something like:  You know, TMC is The Movie Channel and TCM is Turner Classic Movies.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Besides, I have NO DOUBT Marlene would KICK GEORGE RAFT'S COIN-FLIPPING BUTT INTO ANOTHER TIME ZONE if he laid so much as a paw on her in real life.

LOL. No doubt!

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5 hours ago, Hibi said:

LOL. I skipped watching it this go-round. I've seen it enough.

I too have seen it a number of times, but not in a while, so I watched it again.

Pretty entertaining for the most part. Bogie is fairly sympathetic as the gangster,

much more so than the snarling Duke Mantee. The car chase up the mountain

was good, though the finale seemed a little drawn out. Pop must have loved

California. Every time Bogie visits, Pop is sitting on his rear, reading the paper

or having a drink. Beats getting up at the crack of dawn back on the farm.

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On 3/18/2019 at 1:15 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Besides, I have NO DOUBT Marlene would KICK GEORGE RAFT'S COIN-FLIPPING BUTT INTO ANOTHER TIME ZONE if he laid so much as a paw on her in real life.

That is so true and I wouldn't be surprised if she did off camera just to make up what happened on camera.  :lol:

 

And back to the HIGH SIERRA car chase.  I think it would be one of the best ever if it wasn't so obviously a dead end!!!!! :lol:  I remember that from the first time I saw it.  I knew as soon as he started going up into the mountains that he was racing into a dead end and it was so upsetting.  

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I enjoyed High Sierra quite a bit.  First time seeing it.  Impressed with Bogart of course and Ida was really good.  I was fairly disappointed with Joan Leslie though...maybe she was just young in this or something but I thought her character was horrible.  Pa was cool though, really cool.   Good movie for sure but like others have said, more of a gangster flick than a true noir (and I think Eddie would agree).

Eddie had some fantastic commentary on the movie.   And ya, I agree; lose the dog!!  Movie probably has a different ending if it weren't for the dog!

Really looking forward to Lady in the Lake tonight.  Another first time movie for me.

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12 minutes ago, Solafide said:

I enjoyed High Sierra quite a bit.  First time seeing it.  Impressed with Bogart of course and Ida was really good.  I was fairly disappointed with Joan Leslie though...maybe she was just young in this or something but I thought her character was horrible.  Pa was cool though, really cool.   Good movie for sure but like others have said, more of a gangster flick than a true noir (and I think Eddie would agree).

Eddie had some fantastic commentary on the movie.   And ya, I agree; lose the dog!!  Movie probably has a different ending if it weren't for the dog!

Really looking forward to Lady in the Lake tonight.  Another first time movie for me.

I think High Sierra was Leslie's first big role, she was only 15.  That's probably why she comes across as so inexperienced. 

Lady in the Lake is a movie that I saw for the first time and thought it was kind of weird... but I've seen it a couple more times since and it has grown on me a little more with each successive viewing.

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11 minutes ago, Solafide said:

I enjoyed High Sierra quite a bit.  First time seeing it.  Impressed with Bogart of course and Ida was really good.  I was fairly disappointed with Joan Leslie though...maybe she was just young in this or something but I thought her character was horrible.  Pa was cool though, really cool.   Good movie for sure but like others have said, more of a gangster flick than a true noir (and I think Eddie would agree).

Eddie had some fantastic commentary on the movie.   And ya, I agree; lose the dog!!  Movie probably has a different ending if it weren't for the dog!

Really looking forward to Lady in the Lake tonight.  Another first time movie for me.

Not sure I understand your comment about Joan Leslie;   Actors are not responsible for the character they play or the character of the character they play.     So I don't understand what an actor's age has to do with the fact a 'character was horrible'.      

I believe Leslie did a good job of acting and this role was one of the more challenging of her career (versus the sweet young kid types she typically played in the late 30s and early 40s).

 

 

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LADY IN THE LAKE (1946).  Hmmmmm . . . I am very on the fence about this one.  I feel the 1st person camera work might have tarnished the acting at times.  Then again other times it worked pretty well.  I don't know it was pretty decent, not great.  I think my one major complaint would revolve around the staircase scene.  The fact that there is zero immediate indication that Marlowe suspects the woman dressed in black, wearing a pair of gloves, holding the gun at the scene where he finds a dead body just seems too ridiculous.  Other than that it was okay.

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