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20 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

But he does suspect her. Definitely.  You can tell by the way he talks to her and questions her. If you think "he couldn't have suspected her or he would have immediately called the police", you don't know the Marlowe character.

I mean because he basically doesn't mention her again for a bit of time in the movie.  She leaves and he discovers the body, but then doesn't really mention her again for quite some time when logically she should have been his prime suspect.

And I love brussels sprouts.

I agree with a lot that has been said, but I wouldn't say I dislike the movie.  I definitely agree that Montgomery does seem to be forcing his voice and that the camera work becomes a distraction.  He definitely deserves credit for having the stones to try to pull it off.

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Just thinking about Robert Montgomery. Man, this guy made a lot of movies, a lot of rom-coms (not called that of course, back then) in the 1930s, but also some more serious stuff. As far as I can tell, The Lady in the Lake and Ride the Pink Horse were his only noirs. I've always wanted to see Pink Horse, but it seems to be a rare one. And I bet, even if and when Noir Alley does get to airing it, it will be blocked in Canada.

Anyone else ever get Robert Montgomery and Robert Young mixed up? I often do. They're from the same era, about the same age, same first name, and I swear, they look the same to the point where they could have been twins. Oh, and their hair. They must have had the same hair stylist (barber, I guess.)

 

Image result for robert montgomery

Robert Montgomery

 

image.jpeg.0df1d1735c2d6ddee22939dd074b976a.jpeg

 

Robert Young.

Whaddya think?

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3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Just thinking about Robert Montgomery. Man, this guy made a lot of movies, a lot of rom-coms (not called that of course, back then) in the 1930s, but also some more serious stuff. As far as I can tell, The Lady in the Lake and Ride the Pink Horse were his only noirs. I've always wanted to see Pink Horse, but it seems to be a rare one. And I bet, even if and when Noir Alley does get to airing it, it will be blocked in Canada.

Anyone else ever get Robert Montgomery and Robert Young mixed up? I often do. They're from the same era, about the same age, same first name, and I swear, they look the same to the point where they could have been twins. Oh, and their hair. They must have had the same hair stylist (barber, I guess.)

 

Image result for robert montgomery

Robert Montgomery

 

image.jpeg.0df1d1735c2d6ddee22939dd074b976a.jpeg

 

Robert Young.

Whaddya think?

Well MissWonderly, I've seen enough of both guys over the years that I can distinguish between the two of them.  When Eddie mentioned that "Lady In The Lake" was Montgomery's last role at MGM and that he went on to do "Ride The Pink Horse" at Universal, I was crestfallen.  Paramount, Universal, and Republican offerings on TCM are rare treats to die-hard viewers here.  I checked with MovieCollectorOH's comprehensive and trustworthy site, and to my surprise, "Ride The Pink Horse" has been shown 14 times on TCM.  However, the last airing was in November of 2005; so it will probably be another 13-14 years before we get to see it again (if ever)🧓!

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1 hour ago, midwestan said:

Well MissWonderly, I've seen enough of both guys over the years that I can distinguish between the two of them.  When Eddie mentioned that "Lady In The Lake" was Montgomery's last role at MGM and that he went on to do "Ride The Pink Horse" at Universal, I was crestfallen.  Paramount, Universal, and Republican offerings on TCM are rare treats to die-hard viewers here.  I checked with MovieCollectorOH's comprehensive and trustworthy site, and to my surprise, "Ride The Pink Horse" has been shown 14 times on TCM.  However, the last airing was in November of 2005; so it will probably be another 13-14 years before we get to see it again (if ever)🧓!

I'm not sure how big (and good) your local library is, but you may see if they have Ride the Pink Horse that you can borrow or request to have transferred.  I just checked my library system and they do have the film.  I can put in a request to have the film transferred to my local branch.

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17 hours ago, Michael Rennie said:

I disclose not being a Noir fan yet. Mainly, I don't understand it. I do love watching Eddie Muller's views on the films. I am crazy over the way he does the lighting on his set. It is so not how TV works. He has no back lighting. But it works, and even if I don't know Noir, the look is classic mystery. I think the other hosts could experiment with having the lighting mostly on the face.

Eddie does so much more for me than the other hosts. He digs deep. The 2 minutes or so from the other hosts is just data. Eddie does it with feeling.

No matter what, Eddie Muller is my TCM hero. I would love to see a full 30 minute program from Eddie about Noir, especially for people trying to get a better understanding.

Just like Dali said "I am Surrealism" the day will come when you find yourself in a black and white dream sequence after some phantom lady sets you up for a sting, and then when you find yourself up for murder charges and in the slammer, you will be able to say "I am Noir", Michael and you will totally "understand" it.

 

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11 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I'm thinking the "three act story quote" was alluding to a typical screenplay.

I'm sure that's right, as Eddie held up Chandler's original long screenplay to show its

bulk. I suppose if one wanted a short, basic beginning, middle, and end story, Chandler

wasn't your man, though his novels, for the most part, are fairly tightly written. I suppose

Chandler was a novelist who should have stayed away from writing for the movies.

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6 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Just thinking about Robert Montgomery. Man, this guy made a lot of movies, a lot of rom-coms (not called that of course, back then) in the 1930s, but also some more serious stuff. As far as I can tell, The Lady in the Lake and Ride the Pink Horse were his only noirs. I've always wanted to see Pink Horse, but it seems to be a rare one. And I bet, even if and when Noir Alley does get to airing it, it will be blocked in Canada.

Anyone else ever get Robert Montgomery and Robert Young mixed up? I often do. They're from the same era, about the same age, same first name, and I swear, they look the same to the point where they could have been twins. Oh, and their hair. They must have had the same hair stylist (barber, I guess.)

 

Image result for robert montgomery

Robert Montgomery

 

image.jpeg.0df1d1735c2d6ddee22939dd074b976a.jpeg

 

Robert Young.

Whaddya think?

Personally MissW, I've never gotten these two Roberts confused with each other, but that's probably because I grew up watching Robert Young on television as a kid. First as Jim Anderson in Father Knows Best, and then later in Marcus Welby, M.D. But yes, I suppose they do share a similar look about them, and perhaps what would be called "preppy" in today's jargon.

It probably wasn't until my later teen years before I'd even become aware of Robert Montgomery and his film career, and then probably due more to the kinship association to his daughter Elizabeth's success in her long-running sitcom Bewitched

(...in fact, at the time I would have probably been more likely to have confused Robert Montgomery with George Montgomery, and of course more because of their same last name than because of any physical resemblance between the two)

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Nobody is streaming Ride The Pink Horse, according to JustWatch. Criterion does have it on DVD/Blu-ray.

Like Dargo, I know Robert Young from TV. The voice is unmistakable. I didn't know Agnes Moorehead, Samantha's Mom, was an actress until TCM.

I can handle most veggies, even from a can. In moderation.

I wonder what would happen if The Lady In The Lake was redone in Dolby Surround, with Robert Montgomery's voice in the back, and all other voices in the front.

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Re: The above post

I’m very sorry, I’m posting with my phone and for some reason it would only let me Write a reply ***within your quote***, and that would’ve confused everybody.

Just wanted to say that that is a damn perceptive observation and I am intrigued By the potential.

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No need to be sorry, especially with such a nice comment. The concept is simple, but the implementation could be a nightmare. The original audio is monaural. That helps, in my opinion. Separating Robert's voice would be easy enough, until more than one person is talking.

Plays again Tuesday May 14. Hope I can put in this link and it works:
http://www.tcm.com/schedule/weekly.html?tz=est&sdate=2019-05-14

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16 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

Noir AlleyVerified account @NoirAlley 12m12 minutes ago

 

#NoirAlley hosted by @EddieMuller is back this week with Anthony Mann's BORDER INCIDENT ('49) starring Ricardo Montalban

 

Very good film, although also very violent in spots...especially for its time.

Watched what I suppose could be called this "Rural Noir" for the first time on TCM a few years back, and thought both Mann's direction was excellent and John Alton's cinematography was perfectly atmospheric to the story, along with ALL the actors' performances in it. And I do mean "all". Heck, even the often bland George Murphy is good in this one.

(...and this baby REALLY gets fast-paced during the second half)

 

 

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On 3/24/2019 at 11:55 PM, Vautrin said:

Three act story sounds a bit ambiguous and simplistic. Chandler's novels have a lot of

twists and turns. Whether that disqualifies them as a three act story, I'm not sure. I've

always enjoyed reading them and except for The Long Goodbye they're fairly short. 

Yes. the whole term "three act story" strikes me as a glib "proactive" buzzword leaned upon heavily by screenwriting seminar instructors; kind of an around-the-elbow-way of saying "there should be a beginning, a middle, and an end to your story", which is kind of like starting a class on transmission repair by saying "before you start to work on your transmission, you should make sure that you are, in fact, looking under the hood of a car to locate it- and not say, the mouth of a horse or a steamer trunk in the attic."

 

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Yes. the whole term "three act story" strikes me as a glib "proactive" buzzword leaned upon heavily by screenwriting seminar instructors; kind of an around-the-elbow-way of saying "there should be a beginning, a middle, and an end to your story", which is kind of like starting a class on transmission repair by saying "before you start to work on your transmission, you should make sure that you are, in fact, looking under the hood of a car to locate it- and not say, the mouth of a horse or a steamer trunk in the attic."

 

It also seems pretty limiting for anything beyond a very basic story. And just about anything,

however complex and lengthy, could be divided into three acts, though it might take a little

effort to do so, so the term isn't all that meaningful to me. Chandler had a lot of problems

writing Double Indemnity with Billy Wilder. Maybe he was just a "natural" short story and

novel writer who should have stayed away from doing screenplays.

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Sorry one more thing I forgot to mention earlier about THE LADY IN THE LAKE.  I definitely agree that changing the time frame to Christmas added nothing to the plot other than him walking in on the office Christmas party - which wasn't much of anything.  It had to just be a power play by the writer.

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7 hours ago, Looney said:

Sorry one more thing I forgot to mention earlier about THE LADY IN THE LAKE.  I definitely agree that changing the time frame to Christmas added nothing to the plot other than him walking in on the office Christmas party - which wasn't much of anything.  It had to just be a power play by the writer.

I see it was a 23 January 1947 release date (New York City, New York) they may have added it to tie into 1946/47's Christmas/New Years Holiday season or at least the coming attractions would play during the holidays.

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21 hours ago, Looney said:

Sorry one more thing I forgot to mention earlier about THE LADY IN THE LAKE.  I definitely agree that changing the time frame to Christmas added nothing to the plot other than him walking in on the office Christmas party - which wasn't much of anything.  It had to just be a power play by the writer.

 

14 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I see it was a 23 January 1947 release date (New York City, New York) they may have added it to tie into 1946/47's Christmas/New Years Holiday season or at least the coming attractions would play during the holidays.

Picture2.png

my personal theory on why the film version of THE LADY IN THE LAKE is (unlike the novel) set so prominently during Christmas (and has that unusual opening credits sequence where they play JOY TO THE WORLD in front of a snowy Christmas card [?!?!?]) is that ROBERT MONTGOMERY [who was directing and was, according to Bette Davis at least, a very showy and competitive actor] wanted, I think, this (his first directorial effort?) to be a very showy, iconoclastic, "standout" picture. (which, to be fair, it is.)

I like him as an actor, and even when his performances aren't entirely successful, I applaud his risk-taking- I think he applied this same "scene stealing" theory to his direction and he was compounding to the already daunting challenge of filming the story in first person POV by also setting it anachronicstically at Christmas just as a way of saying "this movie is something different."

and in its own weird outre, oddball way, it kindasorta works.

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On 3/25/2019 at 10:14 AM, misswonderly3 said:

Just thinking about Robert Montgomery. Man, this guy made a lot of movies, a lot of rom-coms (not called that of course, back then) in the 1930s, but also some more serious stuff. As far as I can tell, The Lady in the Lake and Ride the Pink Horse were his only noirs. I've always wanted to see Pink Horse, but it seems to be a rare one. And I bet, even if and when Noir Alley does get to airing it, it will be blocked in Canada. . . .

 

Image result for robert montgomery

Robert Montgomery

 

That's a great picture of Robert Montgomery. He's one of my favorites. Ride the Pink Horse is a great noir. The book on which it is based, which I haven't read, was written by Dorothy B. Hughes. She also wrote In a Lonely Place, which is one of my favorite noir books. Recommend it wholeheartedly.

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On 3/25/2019 at 3:30 PM, speedracer5 said:

I'm not sure how big (and good) your local library is, but you may see if they have Ride the Pink Horse that you can borrow or request to have transferred.  I just checked my library system and they do have the film.  I can put in a request to have the film transferred to my local branch.

That's how I got to see Ride the Pink Horse. One of my favorites!

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I agree with mr6666. This movie is 70 years old and "Border Incidents" are still occurring every day. The movie was well done and though it was pretty violent for it's time I found it enjoyable. It's also interesting that this film noir was basically womanless (if that's a word). I guess it is a refreshing change from the femme fatales and hard boiled private detectives we usually see in this genre. However, I'll be ready for Audrey Totter, Ida Lupino or Gloria Grahame to return soon. 

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I definitely enjoyed BORDER INCIDENT (1949) and was surprised by it.  I'd never seen it before and I found it to be a real treat - soooo dark.  I can't imagine how Murphy's final scene made it into that film in 1949.  I mean the implication of it.  I was so shocked it actually happened.  I kept thinking he was going to move or he was going to have grabbed onto the bottom of the bulldozer or something, but NOPE.  WOW!  I thought the opening massacre was pretty extreme for 1949, but the Murphy scene really surprised me.  And the fact that they tried to and then didn't really try to save him - WOW! again.

You know one of the best things for me about NOIR ALLEY was seeing Montalban in MYSTERY STREET (1950).  i was REALLY impressed with his work in that movie.  I hadn't seen much of his early work, but of course I've always thought fondly of him as Khan in Star Trek.  I wouldn't say I was quite as impressed with him in this as I was in MYSTERY STREET, but I was also caught a bit off guard by MYSTERY STREET.  I went into it with some low expectations and Montalban showed me how wrong I was. :D  So I might have felt the same about him in this film had I seen it first.  I mean he was great, but I was expecting it. :lol:

So I really liked the story and the entire cast of BORDER INCIDENT.  I loved Muller's bookends, but the final, in movie, bookend was my least favorite part of the film.

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59 minutes ago, Looney said:

I definitely enjoyed BORDER INCIDENT (1949) and was surprised by it.  I'd never seen it before and I found it to be a real treat - soooo dark.  I can't imagine how Murphy's final scene made it into that film in 1949.  I mean the implication of it.  I was so shocked it actually happened.  I kept thinking he was going to move or he was going to have grabbed onto the bottom of the bulldozer or something, but NOPE.  WOW!  I thought the opening massacre was pretty extreme for 1949, but the Murphy scene really surprised me.  And the fact that they tried to and then didn't really try to save him - WOW! again.

You know one of the best things for me about NOIR ALLEY was seeing Montalban in MYSTERY STREET (1950).  i was REALLY impressed with his work in that movie.  I hadn't seen much of his early work, but of course I've always thought fondly of him as Khan in Star Trek.  I wouldn't say I was quite as impressed with him in this as I was in MYSTERY STREET, but I was also caught a bit off guard by MYSTERY STREET.  I went into it with some low expectations and Montalban showed me how wrong I was. :D  So I might have felt the same about him in this film had I seen it first.  I mean he was great, but I was expecting it. :lol:

So I really liked the story and the entire cast of BORDER INCIDENT.  I loved Muller's bookends, but the final, in movie, bookend was my least favorite part of the film.

Sorry, Looney, I'm not sure what you mean in your last sentence there. (The one I bolded.) Are you referring again to that terrible scene in which poor George Murphy is so horribly murdered? If not, what is the "in movie" bookend you're talking about?

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