Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I, too, enjoyed Border Incident. It's the second time I've seen it, and I liked it a lot more this time around than on my first viewing. Not sure why.

I agree with Looney that Ricardo Montalban is very good in the film. I like this actor - loved him in Mystery Street.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

Sorry, Looney, I'm not sure what you mean in your last sentence there. (The one I bolded.) Are you referring again to that terrible scene in which poor George Murphy is so horribly murdered? If not, what is the "in movie" bookend you're talking about?

guessing he's referring to movie's narrator's conclusion that the movie depicted & solved the ONLY problem (incident) with the corruption, greed, & criminality in the illegal immigration issue

and 'All was right with the world again'

<_<

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Sorry, Looney, I'm not sure what you mean in your last sentence there. (The one I bolded.) Are you referring again to that terrible scene in which poor George Murphy is so horribly murdered? If not, what is the "in movie" bookend you're talking about?

I think he was referring to the narration.

Link to post
Share on other sites

SPOILERS

 

This was the first time for me seeing this film and I was RIVETED. I've had opportunities to see this film before but passed, thinking it wouldn't interest me, but was I wrong! The photography was so outstanding as was the story (minus the narration) I wasn't prepared for the Murphy scene. I thought he would be saved somehow, but it did not turn out that way. Really amazed they let that scene stay in the film!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, mr6666 said:

guessing he's referring to movie's narrator's conclusion that the movie depicted & solved the ONLY problem (incident) with the corruption, greed, & criminality in the illegal immigration issue

and 'All was right with the world again'

<_<

 

6 hours ago, Hibi said:

I think he was referring to the narration.

Oh. Of course. Duh.  

Thanks, guys. Don't know how I could have forgotten about that "frame voice-over"...

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A few additional random thoughts on Border Incident:

I agree with Eddie and the posters here who admire the cinematography in this film, courtesy of the great John Alton. His talent with the camera enhances this already atmospheric film.

I don't know why, but the first time I saw this, I had this idea that it couldn't be a true noir because of its setting. But in fact, Border Incident is very noirish. I mean, aside from the bleak treatment of the Mexican workers and the unbridled greed and cruelty of those taking advantage of them -on both sides of the border - we have that unspeakably awful death of poor George Murphy's character. You can't believe it's going to happen, you keep thinking and hoping that somehow Ricardo Montalban will rescue him. But no. Jack suffers what must be an incredibly painful and terrifying death. The sight of that farm machine drawing closer and closer to him, and his inability to crawl out of its way, has to be one of the most horrifying death scenes in all noir - and as we know, there's no lack of death scenes in noir.

One thing I couldn't help thinking, something that might have saved Jack. The American feds hadn't done their due diligence; how come they hadn't instructed Jack's connection in Kansas (I think it was Kansas), the guy who was contacted to mail the fake immigration permits, to hold off on going to the government office? That was how Parkson found out Jack was a cop. Didn't the feds think someone like Parkson had ways to check up on this kind of thing? If Jack's Kansas connection had been more discreet, maybe tried to phone the government immigration office somehow, instead of advertising what he was doing by walking there, maybe Parkson's spy in Kansas wouldn't have realized anything was up, and Jack might have escaped and lived.

Oh, what the hell, that's a lot of "Ifs" .

By the way, how about that quicksand? Wonder how many bodies were sunk under that stuff? Wonder which death would be more terrifying - getting mowed over by a farm harrow machine, or slowly sinking into that relentless quicksand?  ( fun ideas to ponder, eh?)

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

A few additional random thoughts on Border Incident:

I agree with Eddie and the posters here who admire the cinematography in this film, courtesy of the great John Alton. His talent with the camera enhances this already atmospheric film.

I don't know why, but the first time I saw this, I had this idea that it couldn't be a true noir because of its setting. But in fact, Border Incident is very noirish. I mean, aside from the bleak treatment of the Mexican workers and the unbridled greed and cruelty of those taking advantage of them -on both sides of the border - we have that unspeakably awful death of poor George Murphy's character. You can't believe it's going to happen, you keep thinking and hoping that somehow Ricardo Montalban will rescue him. But no. Jack suffers what must be an incredibly painful and terrifying death. The sight of that farm machine drawing closer and closer to him, and his inability to crawl out of its way, has to be one of the most horrifying death scenes in all noir - and as we know, there's no lack of death scenes in noir.

One thing I couldn't help thinking, something that might have saved Jack. The American feds hadn't done their due diligence; how come they hadn't instructed Jack's connection in Kansas (I think it was Kansas), the guy who was contacted to mail the fake immigration permits, to hold off on going to the government office? That was how Parkson found out Jack was a cop. Didn't the feds think someone like Parkson had ways to check up on this kind of thing? If Jack's Kansas connection had been more discreet, maybe tried to phone the government immigration office somehow, instead of advertising what he was doing by walking there, maybe Parkson's spy in Kansas wouldn't have realized anything was up, and Jack might have escaped and lived.

Oh, what the hell, that's a lot of "Ifs" .

By the way, how about that quicksand? Wonder how many bodies were sunk under that stuff? Wonder which death would be more terrifying - getting mowed over by a farm harrow machine, or slowly sinking into that relentless quicksand?  ( fun ideas to ponder, eh?)

What MissW, never heard that old saying: "Close or good enough for government work" or somethin'???!!! ;)

(...don't they have that saying up there north of the 49th Parallel too?!)

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Well, there goes Murph's dancing career. :(

 

7 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

And George Murphy's dance career went up in smoke the day that MGM signed Gene Kelly. LOL

But he got to go to Washington and learn new dance steps as a US Senator.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes the return of the narrator to close out the film was what I meant.

15 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

By the way, how about that quicksand? Wonder how many bodies were sunk under that stuff? Wonder which death would be more terrifying - getting mowed over by a farm harrow machine, or slowly sinking into that relentless quicksand?  ( fun ideas to ponder, eh?)

I was thinking the exact same thing!  How many souls found their way to that slow sinking doom? :o

I also agree with a lot of the "ifs".  You would think more caution would have been taken.  I mean why wasn't the package all ready to go without having to go to a government office to set it all up?  I mean you can't expect that the bad guys have a connection in another state who could be on the look out fast enough, but why not be a little paranoid when it comes to protecting your agents?!  Have the package ready so it can be sent without having to go sign it out of a government facility.  :rolleyes:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW!

Spurred on by all the discussion here (but having avoided the spoilers), I checked out BORDER INCIDENT last night on TCM on HULU (I had not seen it) and, yeah, it was something different (and good.)

the cat is out of the bag i guess about GEORGE MURPHY and KILLDOZER, so I'm gonna discuss freely- I mainly knew GEORGE from those MGM PARADE shorts, ESPECIALLY THE ONE WHERE HE INTRODUCES SUSAN HAYWARD WHO PLUgS I'LL CRY TOMORROW, DAMN they used to show that A LOT....I digress tho.

He's never much impressed me, kinda had a JACK WEBB vibe.

I bet they had a HARD TIME casting this role, I'm sure what names they had on the roster turned it down (because of the fate of the character)...I was really, really impressed by MURPHY, who seems to be relishing his chance to do something besides introducing clips from GARBO movies in front of a desk set....the scene where he (I can't believe I'm writing this about an MGM movie from 1949(?)) is hooked to the car battery and forced to confess was damn good, almost wonder if maybe they actually had him strapped to a Studebaker...

and then there is that combine scene....I have to admit that I am BAD ABOUT FOCUSING ON THINGS (that are not handsome men) and I often do the sudoku or crossword puzzles while a movie on, and I was guilty of doing this here (although I had been looking up at the movie frequently and listening to it...it's hard to explain how my mind works.

and then the combine thing happened, the sudoku hit the floor and I was like "WHOA, NELLY! IMMA HAVE TO REWIND THIS HERE!!!!"

It was awesome, like a great example of how one artistic choice can make a movie really memorable.

CHARLES MACGRAW was in this, which was good because I have a dry skin spot on my back and was able to scratch it with his voice.

HOWARD DE SILVA was in this and I he was excellent as a real nth rate ****heel of a guy.

Yes, the photgraphy was great.

the actress playing the housekeeper was GORGEOUS.

I really enjoyed the scene where MONTALBAN rides the motrcycle through the plowed rows of a field of lettuce.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Looney said:

Yes the return of the narrator to close out the film was what I meant.

I was thinking the exact same thing!  How many souls found their way to that slow sinking doom? :o

I also agree with a lot of the "ifs".  You would think more caution would have been taken.  I mean why wasn't the package all ready to go without having to go to a government office to set it all up?  I mean you can't expect that the bad guys have a connection in another state who could be on the look out fast enough, but why not be a little paranoid when it comes to protecting your agents?!  Have the package ready so it can be sent without having to go sign it out of a government facility.  :rolleyes:

the quicksand was the one thing I didn't like about the movie.

I have spent some time and worked in horticulture all over southern california and I AINT NEVER SEEN NO QUICKSAND OR ANYTHING LIKE IT ANYWHERE NEAR THERE. I don't think there's enough moisture in SoCal to create quicksand.

and it looked like COCOA WHEATS.

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

One thing I couldn't help thinking, something that might have saved Jack. The American feds hadn't done their due diligence; how come they hadn't instructed Jack's connection in Kansas (I think it was Kansas), the guy who was contacted to mail the fake immigration permits, to hold off on going to the government office? That was how Parkson found out Jack was a cop. Didn't the feds think someone like Parkson had ways to check up on this kind of thing? If Jack's Kansas connection had been more discreet, maybe tried to phone the government immigration office somehow, instead of advertising what he was doing by walking there, maybe Parkson's spy in Kansas wouldn't have realized anything was up, and Jack might have escaped and lived.

Oh, what the hell, that's a lot of "Ifs" .

 

but that's another thing that makes the death so shocking, along with the loooong, tense scene where MONTALBAN visits GEORGE MURPHY's character who is being held hostage in the water tower and the car battery scene and even the bluffing scenes with DeSilva, we've invested a lot of time with this guy and we just don't expect it.

one thing i have come to really dislike about modern tv and movies is that they have turned killing important characters into a trope, even trying to outdo themselves with how shocking it is to the viewers while not thinking what does this add to the story?

IN BORDER INCIDENT the death of one of the central figures is both a shock and a decision that pays off- it shifts the focus to MONTALBAN and his sidekicks and heightens the tension all kinds of up.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

border-incident2.jpg

the lady in the mules at the bottom left of the photo's name is LYNN WHITNEY, she was unbilled (looks like SHIRLEY KNIGHT a bit, doesn't she) and she was the other big twist in the movie, just a treasure buried at the end.

I would watch an entire film series where she and CHARLES MCGRAW played THE LOCKHORNS as sadistic criminals and bickering soulmates.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

the quicksand was the one thing I didn't like about the movie.

I have spent some time and worked in horticulture all over southern california and I AINT NEVER SEEN NO QUICKSAND OR ANYTHING LIKE IT ANYWHERE NEAR THERE. I don't think there's enough moisture in SoCal to create quicksand.

and it looked like COCOA WHEATS.

The quicksand located out in the middle of the desert was something I questioned also, Lorna.

(...oh and btw regarding the motorcyclist riding through the plowed fields...that wasn't Montalban...that was the guy who picked up the immigration papers for De Silva in town and delivered them to him, remember)

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Dargo said:

The quicksand located out in the middle of the desert was something I questioned also, Lorna.

(...oh and btw regarding the motorcyclist riding through the plowed fields...that wasn't Montalban...that was the guy who picked up the immigration papers for De Silva in town and delivered them to him, remember)

damn, sorry.

Thanks for correction. wouldn't be a LHF review without a classic LHF MEMORY LAPSE.

RE QUICKSAND: THANK YOU! And I KNOW you've spent some time in the desert, you know better than me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ps- It also was probably not a Studebaker Battery they had GEORGE strapped to, if El Cid (or anyone else) wants to fill in the specifics of what the make and model was, feel free (it was a surprising scene because you just know there were guys in the audience in 1949 who were like "whoa, we gotta do this!")

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm somewhat surprised that nobody, and including Eddie in his wraparounds, has as yet given a shout out to another dancer/actor other than George Murphy in this film, and who was an even better hoofer than Murphy ever was in movies and on stage in his day.

I'm speaking of James Mitchell here, and who played(and excellently in my opinion) the Mexican bracero Juan Garcia that Montalban befriends when he goes undercover.

ricardo-montalban-james-mitchell-border-

Classically trained in Ballet, Mitchell would have many a featured role dancing in Hollywood musicals in such films as The Band Wagon and Oklahoma, and in his later years would play the ruthless millionaire Palmer Cortlandt in the long-running daytime soap opera All My Children.

(...yep, I would have expected Eddie to have at least mentioned him in passing, but he never did)

 

  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

border-incident2.jpg

the lady in the mules at the bottom left of the photo's name is LYNN WHITNEY, she was unbilled (looks like SHIRLEY KNIGHT a bit, doesn't she) and she was the other big twist in the movie, just a treasure buried at the end.

I would watch an entire film series where she and CHARLES MCGRAW played THE LOCKHORNS as sadistic criminals and bickering soulmates.

LOL! Now there was a series idea! She does look like her (In Shirley's heavier period).

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Looney said:

Yes the return of the narrator to close out the film was what I meant.

I was thinking the exact same thing!  How many souls found their way to that slow sinking doom? :o

I also agree with a lot of the "ifs".  You would think more caution would have been taken.  I mean why wasn't the package all ready to go without having to go to a government office to set it all up?  I mean you can't expect that the bad guys have a connection in another state who could be on the look out fast enough, but why not be a little paranoid when it comes to protecting your agents?!  Have the package ready so it can be sent without having to go sign it out of a government facility.  :rolleyes:

Because then they wouldn't have had that grisly death scene!

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Dargo said:

I'm somewhat surprised that nobody, and including Eddie in his wraparounds, has as yet given a shout out to another dancer/actor other than George Murphy in this film, and who was an even better hoofer than Murphy ever was in movies and on stage in his day.

I'm speaking of James Mitchell here, and who played(and excellently in my opinion) the Mexican bracero Juan Garcia that Montalban befriends when he goes undercover.

ricardo-montalban-james-mitchell-border-

Classically trained in Ballet, Mitchell would have many a featured role dancing in Hollywood musicals in such films as The Band Wagon and Oklahoma, and in his later years would play the ruthless millionaire Palmer Cortlandt in the long-running daytime soap opera All My Children.

(...yep, I would have expected Eddie to have at least mentioned him in passing, but he never did)

 

I was all ready for you to tell us the rustic peasant woman in the photo was really AGNES DEMILLE in a cameo or something....

and NOW you KNOW the REST OF THE STORY!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I was all ready for you to tell us the rustic peasant woman in the photo was really AGNES DEMILLE in a cameo or something....

and NOW you KNOW the REST OF THE STORY!

LOL!

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I TOTALLY RECOGNIZE HIM FROM “THE BAND WAGON” NOW!!!

wow, what a 180!!!!

I didnt, but I looked up his name because he was so handsome (and acted well too! LOL). I'll have to look for him the next times I watch those films.....

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...