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Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Which last show? The actual <spoilers>....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

 

 

 

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The final episode of the series. (what I meant by last show).Well, Joan FINALLY appeared last night. No mention of where she's been keeping herself all this time. (LOL) In your set, do the episodes switch back and forth from B/W and color? They do on Decades and it's very annoying. When the series switched to color, I assume it STAYED in color. (Unsure when we got our first color set) On Decades you'll see a color episode one day, then a B/W the next. Dont get it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Hibi said:

The final episode of the series. (what I meant by last show).Well, Joan FINALLY appeared last night. No mention of where she's been keeping herself all this time. (LOL) In your set, do the episodes switch back and forth from B/W and color? They do on Decades and it's very annoying. When the series switched to color, I assume it STAYED in color. (Unsure when we got our first color set) On Decades you'll see a color episode one day, then a B/W the next. Dont get it.

They only switch back to Black & White after color when the original tape of the show was missing or too damaged. They did have a backup 16 mm kinescope so that's why that happens. It's also used for the missing/damaged tapes of the Black & White period of the show also.

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This might not be the place for it, sorry if that's so, but I've been trying to figure out what noir-ish film I saw on TCM some time back.
It was probably from the 50s... had a stark B&W style to it, no glitz (kind of like Blast of Silence).
The plot was about a brother and sister, possibly on the run, staying in a motor court bungalow. The sister attracts male attention, but she's not-quite-right... childlike, and the brother very protective of her. Turns out the sister might be more disturbed than she appears... possibly to the point of murder.

Any thoughts on what it might be?
Thanks for any info, and sorry if asking this here is against the rules.
K

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10 hours ago, venusboys3 said:

This might not be the place for it, sorry if that's so, but I've been trying to figure out what noir-ish film I saw on TCM some time back.
It was probably from the 50s... had a stark B&W style to it, no glitz (kind of like Blast of Silence).
The plot was about a brother and sister, possibly on the run, staying in a motor court bungalow. The sister attracts male attention, but she's not-quite-right... childlike, and the brother very protective of her. Turns out the sister might be more disturbed than she appears... possibly to the point of murder.

Any thoughts on what it might be?
Thanks for any info, and sorry if asking this here is against the rules.
K

Sorry sounds familiar, but I am not recalling what that one is.  It definitely seems like I caught it on TCM about a year ago though.  (I say that because I was pretty much watching TCM constantly then.) 

Okay sorry to do this, but I have to go back to the quicksand.  I believe it was called "THE VALLEY OF DEATH"!!!!! Anywhere with that title is going to have deadly quicksand.  :D

And did anyone think that maybe the Coyotes made the quicksand themselves?!  I'm just saying, drive a water truck out there with some hoses and there is your disposal pit. :lol:

Okay on to 99 RIVER STREET (1953).  I liked it.  I would tell people to see it if they want to see one of John Payne's best.  And Evelyn Keyes was amazing.  Loved Muller's bookends as usual.  I'm not going to say too much more as the repeat just started on TCM.  I'll wait until everyone else decides to weigh in on the quicksand in this movie.  Downtown New York, who would have thought?! :P

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I too enjoyed this week's Noir Alley entry of "99 River Street".  As usual, Eddie Muller does a nice job on his wrap-arounds for the pictures that are showcased; and it's not just limited to the actors or actresses involved in the movie.  For instance, Eddie Small, the producer of this flick, was once Norma Sherer's agent?  That's a pretty cool tidbit of information.

John Payne is excellent in his role as a championship-caliber boxer turned cabbie after an eye injury ended his pugilistic career.  After the two principle females in the story (Evelyn Keyes and Peggy Castle) make a sap out of him, he swears off women forever and has a dalliance to get back into the boxing ring.  Keyes is able to make amends for her chicanery, but Castle is not, thanks to the smarmy Brad Dexter.  Pretty good action sequences throughout this one, and the sets on the Goldwyn Studios lot were realistic in their portrayal of New York and neighboring Jersey City.

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I thought it was OK too. Obviously, it's not in the same class as DOUBLE INDEMNITY, but Payne was good as was Evelyn Keyes. I wondered what ever happened to John Payne and Eddie explained about his accident. Also I had forgotten (or not even noticed) Ms. Keyes was in GONE WITH THE WIND. This movie also peaked my interest in Brad Dexter. He was perfect as the "bad guy". Though I've seen him many times before, I never really paid much attention. Did he ever get a leading role as "the good guy"?

Both my wife and I enjoy watching these movies on Sunday mornings and learning more from Eddie about all the back stories. I hope TCM keeps them coming.

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20 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

This movie also peaked my interest in Brad Dexter. He was perfect as the "bad guy". Though I've seen him many times before, I never really paid much attention. Did he ever get a leading role as "the good guy"?

I'm not sure how often he played the lead as a 'good guy', but he was one of the "Magnificent Seven".  You can read about his life and filmography at IMDB.com, which is an excellent resource for movies and the people who make them.  In Brad Dexter's case, he's probably the most famous person to be born in Goldfield, Nevada.  His parents were Serbian immigrants, and he spoke Serbian as well as English, which wasn't unusual for kids born into a first generation ethnic family in 1917.

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99 River Street was another good Noir and Eddie's wraparounds were excellent information.

Personally I think Payne was better in Kansas City Confidential, which was made the year before.  The movie was also better.  That one featured Payne, Colleen Gray, Preston Foster, Lee Van Cleef, Jack Elam and Neville Brand and a "Mexican" location.

I remember Brad Dexter from Las Vegas Story (1952) with Victor Mature, Jane Russell and Vincent Price.  He was a sleaze in that one as well, although he started off honorably.

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The producers sure didn't have to spend much on the wardrobe. I had seen this one about a

year or so ago. Payne sure had a hell of a lot of problems for a cab driver, even one who used

to be a contender in the boxing ring. I must have been out in the kitchen or not paying attention

because I didn't notice a scene where Payne got rid of his wife's body or moved it to the trunk of

his cab. I was amused by Eddie mentioning in the intro that the folks in this movie are pretty much

stock characters. Very true, but then that's true of about 80% of all movies, noir or not. After

all that violence and action it's kind of an anti-climax to find out that Payne is a gas station owner.

That type of business didn't work out too well for Burt in The Killers and Mitchum in Out of the

Past. Just a word of warning.

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LOL. No the police found her when Payne was checking out Dexter's apt. I had seen this film before but forgot about the early plot twist with Keyes. Totally surprised by that.

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SO anyone have an answer for venusboys3 question?  It sounds so familiar it is driving Looney crazy. :lol:

 

(Oh WOW!  Can't believe my 100TH post wasn't more interesting, but at least I was trying to help someone.) :lol::D:lol:

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18 hours ago, TheCid said:

99 River Street was another good Noir and Eddie's wraparounds were excellent information.

Personally I think Payne was better in Kansas City Confidential, which was made the year before.  The movie was also better.  That one featured Payne, Colleen Gray, Preston Foster, Lee Van Cleef, Jack Elam and Neville Brand and a "Mexican" location.

I remember Brad Dexter from Las Vegas Story (1952) with Victor Mature, Jane Russell and Vincent Price.  He was a sleaze in that one as well, although he started off honorably.

I like 99 River Street and Kansas City Confidential about equal, my favorite Payne noir is The Crooked Way (1949) and least is Hell's Island (1955).

I'm not sure if I've seen all of his noirs I don't remember Larceny (1948) or Hidden Fear (1957) which may or may not be noir-ish, I like him in Slightly Scarlet (1956) but it's more of an ensemble noir with Rhonda Fleming, Arlene Dahl, John Payne and Ted de Corsia all equally good.

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I need to find SLIGHTLY SCARLET. I'm a big fan of Rhonda Fleming and Arlene Dahl.

Also, I had forgotten about Brad Dexter being one of THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. Most people remember the other six actors, but I guess Dexter wasn't as well known as Brenner, McQueen, Coburn, Bronson, Vaughn and Buckholz. (Sorry, I had to show off that I knew all of the other stars off the top of my old head).

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One of the OTA channels is showing the Lawman series and Peggy Castle is one of the "stars."  When I started watching it I remembered the name, but no idea why.  Should have looked it up, but her role in River Street sort of reminds me of what she was doing.

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I'm just now getting the chance to post here about 99 River Street - hope it's not too anti-climactic.

So, I really enjoyed it. Like a lot of the films Eddie shows, I'd seen it before, albeit quite a while ago. And, once again, I enjoyed it more this time around than the first time I saw it.

I really like John Payne. If anyone had an "everyman" kind of persona, it was him. Although....come to think of it, I guess that means that "everyman" gets angry at lot. He was good in Kansas City Confidential too. I like both films.

I'd forgotten that 99 River Street has never a dull moment. It's pretty much non-stop, something going on all the time. Some noirs are very talky - not that I mind that, but if you're not already a dedicated noir fan, a lot of expository dialogue can be hard on the attention span, slow things down a bit. No problem with that in 99 River Street. I really enjoy the way Payne zips around New York City in his cab, seemingly going from crisis to crisis. It's kind of fun.

I don't agree with Eddie's sympathy for Payne's characters's horrible wife. Peggie Castle does a great job as the avaricious discontented wife who needs dough, and plenty of it, and her washed-up ex-boxer husband isn't coming through with the goods. I really disliked her, and I think we're supposed to - for one thing - SPOILER - her greedy unloving attitude means we're not too sad or shocked when she gets offed.

Speaking of that, I really like that guy who played her killer. Brad Dexter - what a bad guy ! I remember him from other noirs, especially the corrupt lawyer or private detective or whatever he was in The Asphalt Jungle. He's got these very pale eyes, maybe they were very light blue in real life, but in black and white movies they look almost unnatural and certainly give him a very cold appearance. Wonder if anyone ever considered casting him as a Nazi ? His character in River Street is the kind of bad guy who makes noir extremely entertaining.

Can't end this post without mentioning Evelyn Keyes. I like the way she's first likable and sympathetic (as in her introductory scene in the drug store with Payne, all excited about her audition), then she's deceptive and manipulative  (using Payne as an uncomprehending participant in her audition), and then she's back to supportive and likable again. I love that scene near the end, where she sashays into that dive bar and starts dancing seductively, trying to get Brad Dexter's attention. You get the feeling Keyes had fun with that scene.

Anyway, I thought 99 River Street was an enjoyable little ride along noir alley. I'd recommend it to anyone looking for an action-packed noir. Not as much existential angst as some noirs, but that's ok. 

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I think this one was all shot on studio sets and it worked. I don't believe any of this was shot around NYC. I checked  IMDb and it lists Hoboken, NJ and Petersburg, Va, but those got to be bogus.

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34 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I dont think that waterfront at the end was a set.

I agree. Even if the rest of the film was mainly sets, shirley that final sequence, all along the waterfront, was real. Sure looked real to me, anyway.

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14 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I agree. Even if the rest of the film was mainly sets, shirley that final sequence, all along the waterfront, was real. Sure looked real to me, anyway.

Hollywood Magic.

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32 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I agree. Even if the rest of the film was mainly sets, shirley that final sequence, all along the waterfront, was real. Sure looked real to me, anyway.

Yes, but did you notice during the final fight scene between Payne and Dexter which takes place on that ship's gangway, there seemed to be some sort of mat background effect which didn't quite gel with the rest of the surroundings?

There seemed to be "strips" along it that were in different hues of B&W.

(...and which leads me to believe that CJ might be right with his above "Hollywood Magic" comment) 

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