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Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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Selby lists 5

 

Hmmm...so only 5 for Calleia, eh?!

 

Seems it would be a lot more than that, wouldn't ya say CJ?

 

(...and btw...another actor who I didn't see on that list and who seemed to be in a whole slew of Noirs was Marc Lawrence...as you know, often cast in many of the same type of roles as Calleia)

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Hmmm...so only 5 for Calleia, eh?!

 

Seems it would be a lot more than that, wouldn't ya say CJ?

 

(...and btw...another actor who I didn't see on that list and who seemed to be in a whole slew of Noirs was Marc Lawrence...as you know, often cast in many of the same type of roles as Calleia)

Lawrence has 4 entries, Asphalt Jungle, The Black Hand, I Walk Alone, and Jigsaw.

You're right Calleia is in 6, Cry Tough, Deadline At Dawn, The Glass Key, Lured, Touch Of Evil, and Gilda. Gilda is in the first Index of the 25 reviews so I missed it

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Portion of a poster for Thieves' Highway:

 

XJgKc3u.jpg

 

I'm a little surprised this hasn't been scheduled for Noir Alley yet.

(Perhaps it's considered too much for Sunday mornings.)

Maybe it will be shown next year after the timeslot change.

 

 

LOL!!! What company released it?

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20th Century Fox,  so we will be lucky if TCM even shows it.

 

I dunno, there's been a real thaw in TCM's relations with Fox in the last three-four years...THE BEST OF EVERYTHING, LOOOOOOOOVE IS A MANY SPLENDOOOOOORED THING, LAURA, THE RAZOR'S EDGE, BLOOD AND SAND, HOLY MATRIMONY, THE SONG OF BERNADETTE, THE MARK OF ZORRO and quite a few others have shown up with some regularity...and a lot of Marilyn films too.

 

so don't lose out on hope.

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I dunno, there's been a real thaw in TCM's relations with Fox in the last three-four years...THE BEST OF EVERYTHING, LOOOOOOOOVE IS A MANY SPLENDOOOOOORED THING, LAURA, THE RAZOR'S EDGE, BLOOD AND SAND, HOLY MATRIMONY, THE SONG OF BERNADETTE, THE MARK OF ZORRO and quite a few others have shown up with some regularity...and a lot of Marilyn films too.

 

so don't lose out on hope.

 

Yes,  there has been a thaw and we are seeing more Fox films,  but I assume these are limited leasing packages of films.  Note they tend to focus on the major Fox stars like Power,  Tierney (and of course she was Osborn's honey),  Jones,  Monroe and Hayward.

 

Is TCM willing to pony up for actors like Conte and noir\crime films that are lower budget pictures?   

 

But I'll take your advice and I won't lose out hope.   :)  

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Good points James and Lorna - I think Thieves' Highway was last shown on TCM as part of the Summer Under the Stars tribute to Lee J. Cobb in 2015, so it can be done.

 

I wonder if it is any more difficult (/ more costly) to get permission to show a film along with the 'extras' that Eddie features in his intros? (publicity materials, clips, etc.)

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But I'll take your advice and I won't lose out hope. :)

...on more Fox flicks showing up on TCM, sure.

 

But if you want to lose hope in re: everything else in the world, that's a perfectly rational standpoint.

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So,

 

i've been meaning to bring this up ever since someone posted Eddie's tweet and the claim that IN A LONELY PLACE is his favorite film noir...

 

Really?

 

AND I SAY THIS NOT IN A JUDGING or CONDESCENDING WAY, MIND YOU!!!!! I assure you, it is more bemusement than anything!!

 

AND

 

This is coming from someone who adores FLAMINGO ROAD to pieces and has seen JAWS 3-D 100 or more times, and someone who understands that GENUINE LOVE for a film can be an inscrutable thing depending on all sorts of circumstances- even those under which one sees said film...but....

 

Really?

 

And let's get something else straight- I love Bogie (and PLACE does contain one of his absolute finest performances); I love Gloria Grahame- and she's great in this; and I love Nicolas Ray- I'd rate THEY LIVE BY NIGHT, JOHNNY GUITAR and REBEL among the finest movies of the 20th century..

 

.but IN A LONELY PLACE?

 

Gosh, notsomuch.

 

And I've brought this up before, and I've seen the damn thing 15 or 20 times and EVERY TIME, I'd rate it (God I'm sorry, Eddie) no higher than two and a half out of four stars. It's just got too many faults for me to really love it...the lazy voiceoevers, the cheap and uninspired sets; the set-up and dialogue of the scenes at the beginning featuring the murder victim; and (AS I RECALL IT AND I MAY RECALL WRONG) there's a lack of fluid camerawork- there's no visual flare to the presentation of the shots the way there was in THEY DRIVE, GUITAR and REBEL....I don't think the camera moves in the film once; AND I KNOW RAY CAN DO BETTER.

 

I prolly should've checked my copy of Eddie's book DARK CITY before I sat down to read this, but as I recall it (**SEE EARLIER STATEMENT ON THE RELIABILITY OF LHF's MEMORY),Eddie ends the book with a story about Bogie's first wife Mayo Methot (sp?) and her tragic demise near the film's release time, and he links it to the movie in a lovely way, SO IT IS IS ENTIRELY POSSIBLE HE REALIZES THE FAULTS OF THE FILM AND EMBRACES IT ANYWAY, which I get,

 

but to prefer IN A LONELY PLACE to ACE IN THE HOLE or SUNSET BLVD or DOUBLE INDEMNITY or SHADOW OF A DOUBT...?

 

Really?

 

And if Eddie- can I call you Eddie?- wants to come and brutally school me like Bobo in THE GRIFTERS for my popping off and dissing HIS FAVORITE FILM Noir, well, I guess I'll put the oranges in the sock for you and let you go to town, Eddie.

 

But...

 

Really?

 

And I admit I read the SAYERS novel when I was a teenager and then saw the movie, and I was a bit jarred by how different they were....the Sayers novel is grim as Hell and was a muddle to get through, it's one of the darkest books I've ever read by a woman.

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this is a version of IN A LONELY PLACE that was done on the SUSPENSE! RADIO SHOW, it was a special hour long broadcast and it features ROBERT MONTGOMERY and is MUCH MORE FAITHFUL TO THE NOVEL and- forgive me- I like it a lot better than the movie.

 

highly recommended, it's one dark hour  of radio:

 

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20th Century Fox,  so we will be lucky if TCM even shows it.

 

I see. Chances arent great. :(

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but to prefer IN A LONELY PLACE to ACE IN THE HOLE or SUNSET BLVD or DOUBLE INDEMNITY or SHADOW OF A DOUBT...?

 

Really?

 

 

I agree, and for me, I don't get the great Visuals, from In A Lonely Place either. I mean hell, Film Noir sort of got noticed for its dark visual style and stories. It's the same reason I prefer I Wake Up Screaming (what a great title too boot) to The Maltese Falcon.

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So,

 

i've been meaning to bring this up ever since someone posted Eddie's tweet and the claim that IN A LONELY PLACE is his favorite film noir...

 

Really?

 

AND I SAY THIS NOT IN A JUDGING or CONDESCENDING WAY, MIND YOU!!!!! I assure you, it is more bemusement than anything!!

 

AND

 

This is coming from someone who adores FLAMINGO ROAD to pieces and has seen JAWS 3-D 100 or more times, and someone who understands that GENUINE LOVE for a film can be an inscrutable thing depending on all sorts of circumstances- even those under which one sees said film...but....

 

Really?

 

And let's get something else straight- I love Bogie (and PLACE does contain one of his absolute finest performances); I love Gloria Grahame- and she's great in this; and I love Nicolas Ray- I'd rate THEY LIVE BY NIGHT, JOHNNY GUITAR and REBEL among the finest movies of the 20th century..

 

.but IN A LONELY PLACE?

 

Gosh, notsomuch.

 

And I've brought this up before, and I've seen the damn thing 15 or 20 times and EVERY TIME, I'd rate it (God I'm sorry, Eddie) no higher than two and a half out of four stars. It's just got too many faults for me to really love it...the lazy voiceoevers, the cheap and uninspired sets; the set-up and dialogue of the scenes at the beginning featuring the murder victim; and (AS I RECALL IT AND I MAY RECALL WRONG) there's a lack of fluid camerawork- there's no visual flare to the presentation of the shots the way there was in THEY DRIVE, GUITAR and REBEL....I don't think the camera moves in the film once; AND I KNOW RAY CAN DO BETTER.

 

I prolly should've checked my copy of Eddie's book DARK CITY before I sat down to read this, but as I recall it (**SEE EARLIER STATEMENT ON THE RELIABILITY OF LHF's MEMORY),Eddie ends the book with a story about Bogie's first wife Mayo Methot (sp?) and her tragic demise near the film's release time, and he links it to the movie in a lovely way, SO IT IS IS ENTIRELY POSSIBLE HE REALIZES THE FAULTS OF THE FILM AND EMBRACES IT ANYWAY, which I get,

 

but to prefer IN A LONELY PLACE to ACE IN THE HOLE or SUNSET BLVD or DOUBLE INDEMNITY or SHADOW OF A DOUBT...?

 

Really?

 

And if Eddie- can I call you Eddie?- wants to come and brutally school me like Bobo in THE GRIFTERS for my popping off and dissing HIS FAVORITE FILM Noir, well, I guess I'll put the oranges in the sock for you and let you go to town, Eddie.

 

But...

 

Really?

 

And I admit I read the SAYERS novel when I was a teenager and then saw the movie, and I was a bit jarred by how different they were....the Sayers novel is grim as Hell and was a muddle to get through, it's one of the darkest books I've ever read by a woman.

 

While I don't rate IALP as one of my top 10 noir films,  I really enjoy the film and believe it is first rate.    As for "I may recall wrong'; the scene between Bogie and soon to be murder victim does have unique camera work since the actress, Martha Stewart,  talks right to the camera when she is talking to Bogie.   This gives the audience the same view as Bogie and therefore we 'see' what he sees;  this is one really annoying women!       This is linked to the initial police grilling by the captain since Bogie appears uninterested that she was murdered (making jokes etc...).  

 

I love many other scenes like the one where Bogie visits his cop friend's house and gets his friend to almost strangles his wife.  I find this to be "very Hitchcock".        I also love the fact that the setting is so late 40s Los Angeles.

 

The character actors in the film, like Lovejoy, Donnell, Art Smith, and Reid, give one of their best, if not their best performance in this film.  

 

Maybe like Eddie,  I'm just a doomed romantic,  but any film that has this line ""I was born when she kissed me. I died when she left me. I lived a few weeks while she loved me",   is a winner for me.

 

PS:  Bogie also punches a U.C.L.A  football player and I love that.   Now if he had punched a U.S.C. one I would lower my rating by at least one star.   :lol:

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In A Lonely Place

 

"I was born when she kissed me. I died when she left me. I lived a few weeks while she loved me."

 

Those three simple sentences strung together, written by quixotic screen writer Dixon Steele, beautifully encapsulate the romantic fatalism that permeates this film, bringing it a sense of tragic inevitability.

 

Dixon Steele, the brilliant, moody, prone to sudden outbursts of inexplicable violence film's main protagonist remains one of Bogart's most complex, frightening and mesmerizing performances. It's my understanding, too, that there were elements of the actor in the characterization. I once read a report of Lauren Bacall being frightened of him on one of their yachting excursions, though he did not, apparently, strike her.

 

And Gloria Grahame, far younger than Bogie but with that wealth of experience in her tired eyes, bearing and attitude, all making her seem older than her real years, remains one of his most memorable leading ladies.

 

This Hollywood-set noirish exercise has always had a very strong appeal for me. I have to wonder, too, how many women watching this film shiver with the memories of a Dixon Steele they may have known or, even worse, recognize him in their current relationship.

 

inalonelyplace2.jpg

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.....and in regards, concerning the visuals, to my last post I prefer John Huston's The Asphalt Jungle to The Maltese Falcon

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You all forced me to watch In a Lonely Place before Sunday so I could read your comments without fear of spoilers.

 

All I can say is, Eddie has a lot of explaining to do.

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You all forced me to watch In a Lonely Place before Sunday so I could read your comments without fear of spoilers.

 

All I can say is, Eddie has a lot of explaining to do.

 

Hopefully they have him back enough so he can talk about that, and a whole lot more.

 

Eddie's the best...I wouldn't dare leave that out, lest I wind up "out of service" somewhere.  The best, I say!

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You all forced me to watch In a Lonely Place before Sunday so I could read your comments without fear of spoilers.

 

All I can say is, Eddie has a lot of explaining to do.

Oh wow, sorry, I sort of assumed we'd all seen it by now (jaded bunch of classic aficionados that we are)

 

I'll do my best to refrain from discussing any spoilers until after it shows on Sunday, and do check it out, it's by no means a bad film, but it's [to me] not a great film.

 

Feel free to listen to the radio episode that I posted of it tho; it has VERY LITTLE in common with the film aside from the bare bones of the plot.

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Noir Alley Cats

 

Just a sidebar, but I was re-watching The Asphalt Jungle last night, and in the Gus Minissi's Lunch Counter (James Whitmore) segment there is a sequence with a cat. So that got me thinking about how many cats were featured in Film Noir. The poor kitty in The Postman Always Rings Twice came to mind, and as I'm typing I just remembered the cat in This Gun for Hire. I'm sure there are a few more. Lets see how many we can remember.

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Maybe like Eddie,  I'm just a doomed romantic,  but any film that has this line ""I was born when she kissed me. I died when she left me. I lived a few weeks while she loved me",   is a winner for me.

 

Yeah, no matter what you think of the overall film, that line is one of the best ever written- I concede that.

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Yeah, no matter what you think of the overall film, that line is one of the best ever written- I concede that.

 

 

Yeah. DITTO.

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it just occured to me that maybe IN A LONELY PLACE is Eddie's favorite noir, which differentiates itself from what he thinks is the best noir.

 

I'd, for example, consider for a moment or two that LAURA is my favorite noir, but as for THE BEST, no, its flaws preclude it.

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Yeah, no matter what you think of the overall film, that line is one of the best ever written- I concede that.

 

REALLY, Lorna?!

 

So, you think THAT one is better than, "Ya SEE?! Ya SEE?! Your stupid minds! STUPID, STUPID!" ???

 

(...of course then again, this one wasn't in a Film Noir, huh...and so maybe you're right here)

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it just occured to me that maybe IN A LONELY PLACE is Eddie's favorite noir, which differentiates itself from what he thinks is the best noir.

 

I'd, for example, consider for a moment or two that LAURA is my favorite noir, but as for THE BEST, no, its flaws preclude it.

 

Yeah, that could be. Guess we'll have to wait for Eddie to weigh in..........

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