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Noir Alley

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4 hours ago, Dargo said:

LOL

lizabeth_scott_dead_reckoning-07.png

"Look kiddo. Not ONLY do I lip-sync the hell out'a that "Either It's Love Or It Isn't" number, but I ALSO look absolutely FABULOUS and without a SINGLE laceration on this face of mine after going through that Lincoln Continental's windshield and while lying here in this hospital bed waiting to die at the end of this baby TOO!"

(...oh wait...should I have supplied a "spoiler alert" here first???...yeah, maybe I should have, huh...eeeh, screw it)

 

As Bogie memorably says to Liz at the end, "Cochise, Mike."

Or something like that.

brokenarrow_iamcochise_FC_HD_2997_470x26

"How did I get in here?"

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DEAD RECKONING (1947)

Not much time this morning.  I enjoyed it; can't say it is a new favorite.  Loved how it looked.  Probably stop by later to chat about it a little more. LOL :D

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I enjoyed "Dead Reckoning", which ironically could have been titled "Dead Wreckening" given how the movie ended.  One scene toward the end of this one was reminiscent of the final scene in "The Big Sleep" where the first one out the door 'gets it'.  Noir movies contain a lot of mystery and enough suspense to keep me entertained, and the cast here was very good.  Poor Lizabeth Scott; only wanting the good things in life, but going about getting them in the most unscrupulous ways!  What more can you say about Humphrey Bogart?  If I contend that Claire Trevor was the woman who got slapped or shot most in the movies, I'd have to say Bogart was the man who got slugged or drugged the most!  

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5 hours ago, TomJH said:

As Bogie memorably says to Liz at the end, "Cochise, Mike."

Or something like that.

 

 

Actually he said Geronimo which is what paratroopers said as the exited the plane.

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I planned to just watch Eddie Muller's intro and outro since I have the movie on DVD,but got sucked into watching it again.  I prefer it to many of Bogart's movies and Lizabeth Scott may be one reason.  Also identify with the Army Airborne part.

SPOILER BELOW

Liked that Eddie pointed out that much of it was filmed in St. Petersburg FL.  Because of all the daytime outdoor scenes and the well lit hotel and nightclub scenes, it is not as dark as many Noirs.  That didn't hurt it a bit.  Other than her singing, Scott gave a very good performance.  The first time I saw it, I did not know which side of the line she was on until the very end.  Due to good acting, writing and directing.

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Familiar as the material is, I still enjoy Dead Reckoning. Sometimes the cliche tough guy dialogue and narration does make me snicker.

Bogart is Mr. Super Tough Cool, of course, though the bit where he talks about wishing he could shrink a woman down to fit in his pocket and only come out full size, looking beautiful, when it's convenient for him might be regarded by some as a tad chauvanistic.

I was also paying attention to the sound effects in the casino scene towards the beginning. When Bogart was playing craps and kept rolling those dice for winners did anyone else notice the loudness of those dice in his hand every time he shook them? He sounded like he was mixing a drink with ice in a cardboard carton!

And here's a small thank you to Wally Ford. He only has a couple of scenes in the film as an old time safe cracker, but he makes them count.

Dead-Reckoning-Bogart-casino-Lizabeth-Sc

"Okay, Martinelli, now I'm going to win money at this table with the loudest pair of dice you ever heard."

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9 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Actually he said Geronimo which is what paratroopers said as the exited the plane.

Well, I knew that, Cid. It was an attempt at humour on my part. I guess it kinda failed with you.

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Well, I knew that, Cid. It was an attempt at humour on my part. I guess it kinda failed with you.

Sorry if I didn't recognize the humor.  Airborne does not use Geronimo anymore.  When I was doing it we counted to six by thousands.  If your chute had not opened by then, time to pull the reserve.  Supposedly Geronimo was supposed to be the same time test.

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I love the iconic imagery. Bogart in his romantic tough guy prime with the lights of a city shining below. Bogart got loaned by Warner Brothers to Columbia for Dead Reckoning so he could make, in essence, another Warner Brothers film.

dead-reck2.png

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3 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I love the iconic imagery. Bogart in his romantic tough guy prime with the lights of a city shining below.

dead-reck2.png

I liked that shot as well, but to me it didn't look like St. Petersburg (Gulf City) Florida.

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I enjoyed Dead Reckoning this time around more than the other 3 times or so I've seen it. Maybe because this time I didn't fall asleep at some point, which is what always seemed to happen before.  "That said", it's definitely not one of my favourite noirs. I tried to figure out why I'm not crazy about it with this viewing (after all, I was wide awake this time.)

I think it's partly that the plot just doesn't hold together that well. Now, before all my fellow noir fans point out to me that, hey, that's the case with about 90 per cent of classic film noirs, I'll say, yes, I know that. Noir is not known for carefully structured plots that make sense and are easy to follow. In fact, that's kind of part of the fun of noir..who cares if the plot is unbelievably convoluted and is full of holes, if it's got that noirish feel and look and is fun to watch, I'm in !

But something about the way Dead Reckoning tells its extremely complicated story just doesn't work for me. When Eddie revealed that the screenplay had no less than five writers, that helped explain it a bit. Too many cooks spoil the broth and all that.

And it's confusing in its settings sometimes. Is it just me who can't figure out if those two key scenes, the ones in Martinelli'soffice, take place in his nightclub or his home?It looks like the nightclub - all three scenes in his office look the same, with the safe behind that bizarre picture of that woman and the photo of Coral (how come Bogie never seems to notice that ?) But it seems as though, the other two times Bogie has it out with the bad guys, this same office is in Martinelli's home. Especially that final scene: doesn't Bogart enter the nightclub initially, and then winds up in the office, looking for the gun? (the first time he's looking for his friend's letter.) Both of those scenes feel as though they're taking place in Martinelli's private home. But the office is exactly the same as the office in the nightclub !

I realize I'm blathering on to a probably boring degree with this, but I've never been able to figure it out. Can anyone enlighten me? Or is it, as I suspect, a case of the five writers literally not getting their stories straight?

Also - - why does Rip's friend, McGee, say "nice to have met you" to Coral/"Mike", after he brings the grenades to her apartment (in a  paper lunch bag!) , as though he'd never seen her before, when she was with Rip the day before when Rip visited McGee in his home to ask about cracking Martinelli's safe?  (God, even just reading that sentence over reminds me of how convoluted this story was...)

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Dead Reckoning comments Part 2 (hey, I'm trying to keep my posts here shorter.):

I can never decide whether I like Lizabeth Scott or not. Sometimes I do, as in The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, where she's very likable and sympathetic. Then there's her pure evil femme from hell, Jane Palmer in Too Late for Tears-in which she makes her character in Dead Reckoning look like a Sunday school teacher by comparison. I've noticed Lizabeth has this odd way of smiling when she wants her character (this is in any movie I've seen her in, not just D.R.) to be both appealing and innocent-seeming to the male character she's talking to. It's like she literally turns on a smile button, it looks so contrived to me. I like to think that she did this on purpose as part of her acting technique to alert the audience that she can't be trusted.

About Bogie's "woman -in-your-pocket" theory: whoa, that is one dismissive, disrespectful take on women. And I'm someone who usually thinks people over-react to stuff like that in old movies - it takes a lot to offend me. And I'm not so much offended as I am just bemused by Rip/Bogie's fantasy of shrinking women down to size until he wants to get physical with them. I know it's supposed to be kind of funny ("heh heh, what a cute idea, that crazy Bogart" ) but it does say a lot about a man who'd come up with such a fantasy. I am a really big Humphrey Bogart fan, and his "shrink a woman to fit in my pocket" idea is not going to change that. But still, every time I've watched this film (as I say, I think this was the 4th time) that speech leaves me going "Whaaat?!" every time. (I've never been asleep during that scene...it's later in the film that I've dozed off on other occasions.)

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Familiar as the material is, I still enjoy Dead Reckoning. Sometimes the cliche tough guy dialogue and narration does make me snicker.

Bogart is Mr. Super Tough Cool, of course, though the bit where he talks about wishing he could shrink a woman down to fit in his pocket and only come out full size, looking beautiful, when it's convenient for him might be regarded by some as a tad chauvanistic.

I was also paying attention to the sound effects in the casino scene towards the beginning. When Bogart was playing craps and kept rolling those dice for winners did anyone else notice the loudness of those dice in his hand every time he shook them? He sounded like he was mixing a drink with ice in a cardboard carton!

And here's a small thank you to Wally Ford. He only has a couple of scenes in the film as an old time safe cracker, but he makes them count.

Dead-Reckoning-Bogart-casino-Lizabeth-Sc

"Okay, Martinelli, now I'm going to win money at this table with the loudest pair of dice you ever heard."

Tom, I want to agree with you about Wallace Ford. Ford, Morris Carnovsky as Martinelli the casino owner, and Marvin Miller as the sadistic thug Kraus really add a lot to the movie. If you think of Marvin Miller as the nice guy from TV's The Millionaire, as some of us do, his thuggish glee comes as quite a shock. Gotta add these guys to my list of top supporting actors for 1947.

In his introduction Eddie Muller was somewhat dismissive about Lizabeth Scott's performance, though he noted that she has a growing number of admirers. I like her in Dead Reckoning quite a bit. Bogart is dependably good in a familiar role, but so much of the picture revolves around whether Coral aka "Dusty" aka "Mike" is good or bad.  Scott keeps giving us positive indications of both. Muller mentioned that Harry Cohn originally wanted Rita Hayworth to play Coral, but she turned it down. Would this be as interesting a movie with Rita? There's something about the way Lizabeth Scott can project both emotional vulnerability and potential cold-hearted corruption that makes her a very interesting actress in the right role.

By the way, what's with these guys insisting on giving this woman men's nicknames?

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11 minutes ago, kingrat said:

 

In his introduction Eddie Muller was somewhat dismissive about Lizabeth Scott's performance, though he noted that she has a growing number of admirers. I like her in Dead Reckoning quite a bit. Bogart is dependably good in a familiar role, but so much of the picture revolves around whether Coral aka "Dusty" aka "Mike" is good or bad.  Scott keeps giving us positive indications of both. Muller mentioned that Harry Cohn originally wanted Rita Hayworth to play Coral, but she turned it down. Would this be as interesting a movie with Rita? There's something about the way Lizabeth Scott can project both emotional vulnerability and potential cold-hearted corruption that makes her a very interesting actress in the right role.

By the way, what's with these guys insisting on giving this woman men's nicknames?

I always thought there was a bit of a masculine quality to Lizabeth Scott so to me a male nickname for her fits.

Scott's always been a matter largely of indifference to me as either an actress (well, here's she's quite limited) or as a personality. She arguably never looked better than in Dead Reckoning and, with Bogart as her co-star, it must be ranked as one of the most noteworthy films of her career.

I love the night club and casino scenes in a film of this kind (I had flashbacks to Gilda as I watched this film) but, while I certainly enjoy the atmosphere, all that cigarette smoke makes me glad I'm not there to also inhale it. I wonder if in meeting Bogart you'd have been holding your nose with the tobacco and booze odors pouring out of his body and clothes.

lizabeth-scott-smokes.gif

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

 

....I love the night club and casino scenes in a film of this kind (I had flashbacks to Gilda as I watched this film) but, while I certainly enjoy the atmosphere, all that cigarette smoke makes me glad I'm not there to also inhale it. I wonder if in meeting Bogart you'd have been holding your nose with the tobacco and booze odors pouring out of his body and clothes.

 

I had to laugh when, after Coral / "Dusty"  has to sit down to recover from the news of Johnny's death, Bogie lights a cigarette for her and encourages her to "take a couple of deep drags" to make her feel better.  !

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

I had to laugh when, after Coral / "Dusty"  has to sit down to recover from the news of Johnny's death, Bogie lights a cigarette for her and encourages her to "take a couple of deep drags" to make her feel better.  !

The instant cure all between smokers. Nothing like a (cough, gag, cough, gag) deep drag.

tumblr_og334cWJy91u0nkw4o3_250.gif

"Thanks. Rip. It's been 30 seconds since I coughed up a lung."

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Whichever actor played Philip Marlowe had to be used to being knocked out, either by a

a tough with a blackjack or by a shady doctor whose medical license had been suspended,

with some form of blackout narcotic. The latter was usually a more interesting character.

And Gulf City sounds like Bay City, a gritty coastal town with cops who aren't always honest.

And one of the characters is even named Chandler. Hmmm. An okay noir, though the plot

is kind of confusing, especially with there being two murders to think over. Rip Murdock is

okay, but I prefer his kid brother Buz, a cool cat who got his kicks on Route 66.

 

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15 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Whichever actor played Philip Marlowe had to be used to being knocked out, either by a

a tough with a blackjack or by a shady doctor whose medical license had been suspended,

with some form of blackout narcotic. The latter was usually a more interesting character.

And Gulf City sounds like Bay City, a gritty coastal town with cops who aren't always honest.

And one of the characters is even named Chandler. Hmmm. An okay noir, though the plot

is kind of confusing, especially with there being two murders to think over. Rip Murdock is

okay, but I prefer his kid brother Buz, a cool cat who got his kicks on Route 66.

 

I think there actually is a Bay City in CA, but not sure.  I know that it was used several times as a non-LA location in The Rockford Files.

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2 hours ago, TheCid said:

I think there actually is a Bay City in CA, but not sure.  I know that it was used several times as a non-LA location in The Rockford Files.

While I also remember all the corruption Jim Rockford found in the fictional town of "Bay City, CA" in that Garner series Cid, it's actually just that...fictional.

Nope, while there are actually towns named "Bay City" in the states of Illinois, Michigan, Oregon, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_City

...but that in the noir classics penned by Raymond Chandler, the name "Bay City" was apparently quite often used by this writer in particular as a stand-in or pseudonym for Santa Monica, CA...

https://www.shamustown.com/baycity.html

 

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So, getting back to Dead Reckoning - can anyone answer my question about that office of Martinelli's, and why sometimes it seems like it's in his nightclub (like in "Gilda" and many other noirs with bad nightclub/casino owners), and other times the exact same office appears to be in Martinelli's home?

 Like, in the penultimate scene where Rip and Martinelli rush down the stairs and Martinelli bursts out the door and is shot: it doesn't look even remotely like the nightclub setting - except for that office ! Didn't anyone else notice this? Or does it simply not matter? (maybe that's the answer right there.)

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22 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Dead Reckoning comments Part 2 (hey, I'm trying to keep my posts here shorter.):

I can never decide whether I like Lizabeth Scott or not. Sometimes I do, as in The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, where she's very likable and sympathetic. Then there's her pure evil femme from hell, Jane Palmer in Too Late for Tears-in which she makes her character in Dead Reckoning look like a Sunday school teacher by comparison. I've noticed Lizabeth has this odd way of smiling when she wants her character (this is in any movie I've seen her in, not just D.R.) to be both appealing and innocent-seeming to the male character she's talking to. It's like she literally turns on a smile button, it looks so contrived to me. I like to think that she did this on purpose as part of her acting technique to alert the audience that she can't be trusted.

(If the following response offends anyone, I will remove it.)

but....

The way I view Lizabeth Scott in (especially) MARTHA IVERS (and some of her other roles) is to pretend she has a kind of a LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA thing going on...like an un-diagnosed case of early autism or some sort of sensory disorder...just, you know- functioning and all, but the elevator has been known to skip a few floors...

(all in all, it adds to her curious allure.)

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1 minute ago, misswonderly3 said:

So, getting back to Dead Reckoning - can anyone answer my question about that office of Martinelli's, and why sometimes it seems like it's in his nightclub (like in "Gilda" and many other noirs with bad nightclub/casino owners), and other times the exact same office appears to be in Martinelli's home?

 Like, in the penultimate scene where Rip and Martinelli rush down the stairs and Martinelli bursts out the door and is shot: it doesn't look even remotely like the nightclub setting - except for that office ! Didn't anyone else notice this? Or does it simply not matter? (maybe that's the answer right there.)

Yep, I agree MissW. I too thought the movie seemed "confused" as to where Martinelli's office was located.

And re the very first nightclub scene in which Bogie first meets Liz Scott, I also found myself chuckling a bit at how the scene played out while they're sitting at that table and Bogie tells her the news that Johnny is dead.

I dunno, perhaps it was because (and as Eddie Muller spoke of during his intro about Liz getting less than glowing reviews for her acting in this film) but she came across to me anyway as if I could see her "acting" as clear as day and that she didn't come across as a "real" person, especially in that scene.

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23 hours ago, TomJH said:

Well, I knew that, Cid. It was an attempt at humour on my part. I guess it kinda failed with you.

While Cid may not have at first gotten your earlier Geronimo/Cochise joke here Tom, I know somebody around here who'll at least very much appreciate your posting of that Jeff Chandler pix in the film Broken Arrow (filmed right here in Sedona AZ, btw), anyway.

(...lavenderblue...she's a BIG fan of Jeff's, ya know) ;)

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37 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

So, getting back to Dead Reckoning - can anyone answer my question about that office of Martinelli's, and why sometimes it seems like it's in his nightclub (like in "Gilda" and many other noirs with bad nightclub/casino owners), and other times the exact same office appears to be in Martinelli's home?

 Like, in the penultimate scene where Rip and Martinelli rush down the stairs and Martinelli bursts out the door and is shot: it doesn't look even remotely like the nightclub setting - except for that office ! Didn't anyone else notice this? Or does it simply not matter? (maybe that's the answer right there.)

Nah, I'm as uncertain as you are about the location, MissW, except I agree that when Martinelli got shot (unless he had some sort of private exit) it sure didn't look like any night club. But, again, while a bit confusing, I don't think it's all that particularly important either. My bet that is that the fire climax is at his home.

In the area of loose plot ends, whatever happened to that body that Bogie dumped in Liz's car trunk? And how did he get it in it? He had access to her keys?

Speaking of Martinelli, it sure was a shame that George Macready wasn't available to play the part. Morris Carnovksy is okay in the role of a smooth corrupt baddie but Macready could bring a creepy perverse quality to his playing that definitely added to a film. In regard to that, Marvin Miller did bring a psychopathic edge to his playing of Krause. He was clearly a guy who enjoyed beating information out of people, Bogie, in particular (amazing how cleared up Bogie's face was from the beating after three days of rest. Not even a bruise).

MV5BOWU4ZDMzOGItOGY2MS00NDMzLTgzZjQtOGY3

"Just for that, Martinelli, I'm going to fire bomb your home. No, not because you're a racketeer and you had me beat up. It's because you've got a better picture of my girl here than I do myself."

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This was my first time seeing DEAD RECKONING. It's hard to believe since I'm a huge Bogart fan. It was good, but won't make my top ten Bogart films. Lizabeth Scott is growing on me. I'm looking forward to seeing more of her films on Noir Alley. 

Also, I too noticed that the huge gash on Murdock's cheek did heal quickly. Good catch, TomJH.

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