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Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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5 minutes ago, BrownShoes said:

Last week I caught the showing of Pickup on South Street. Now I'm a fan of Jean Peters. Unfortunately I see that she went into retirement fairly quickly.

Peters was in other noir \ crime films:  Niagara (with Monroe and Cotton),  and Vicki (where Jean is the title character with Jeanne Crain),   and A Blueprint for Murder (again with Cotton).

Other big films are Viva Zapata (miscast as a Mexican but she does OK opposite Bando),  and Three Coins in a Fountain.      

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3 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Well, poor ol' Buz lost his eyesight yesterday. Somehow he miraculously regained

it before the episode ended. Never underestimate the healing power of Route 66. 

...or hour-long formulaic television drama in general, for that matter.

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45 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Peters was in other noir \ crime films:  Niagara (with Monroe and Cotton),  and Vicki (where Jean is the title character with Jeanne Crain),   and A Blueprint for Murder (again with Cotton).

Other big films are Viva Zapata (miscast as a Mexican but she does OK opposite Bando),  and Three Coins in a Fountain.      

Yeah James, and wasn't Jean also in that sci-fi monster flick with Tim Holt that was set at the Salton Sea?

Oh...wait. That was Audrey Dalton, wasn't it.

(...sorry, my mistake) ;)

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10 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yeah James, and wasn't Jean also in that sci-fi monster flick with Tim Holt that was set at the Salton Sea?

Oh...wait. That was Audrey Dalton, wasn't it.

(...sorry, my mistake) ;)

Were you watching Wagon Train yesterday?   I ask because Audrey Dalton was one of the guest stars.     I always enjoy stumbling on to some 'old' TV show and seeing Audrey.    My kind of brunette.   (below are both Dalton and Peters).

Image result for Audrey daltonImage result for jean peters

 

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1 hour ago, BrownShoes said:

Last week I caught the showing of Pickup on South Street. Now I'm a fan of Jean Peters. Unfortunately I see that she went into retirement fairly quickly.

She was married to Howard Hughes. I wonder if that played a part. 

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4 hours ago, Dargo said:

...or hour-long formulaic television drama in general, for that matter.

That's for sure. Route 66 was just one of many. I doubt it took very long for the

experienced TV viewer to figure out where things were headed about 90% of the time.

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On 6/27/2019 at 11:01 PM, Dargo said:

In case it hasn't been mentioned yet, the 1949 RKO film noir The Clay Pigeon that Barbara Hale costarred in with her husband Bill Williams is occasionally shown on TCM.

HA!  I can't believe I forgot about THE CLAY PIGEON (1949). Thanks for the catch Dargo.

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3 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Were you watching Wagon Train yesterday?   I ask because Audrey Dalton was one of the guest stars.     I always enjoy stumbling on to some 'old' TV show and seeing Audrey.    My kind of brunette.   (below are both Dalton and Peters).

No, didn't happen to catch that James, but as you probably guessed, the reason I offered up the Dalton/Peters quip earlier was because not only have I always thought those two cuties resembled each other quite a bit, but also because you and I have talked about our mutual fondest for them in the past.

(...in fact, I believe you might've even agreed with me about their physical likenesses when their names have come up in conversation) 

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10 hours ago, BrownShoes said:

Last week I caught the showing of Pickup on South Street. Now I'm a fan of Jean Peters. Unfortunately I see that she went into retirement fairly quickly.

Yes too quickly, Pickup on South Street was the apex of her career. I liked her in Niagara and O.Henry's Full House, not so much in Blueprint for Murder or Vicki. Surprisingly she made them all in a roughly one year period, but her sweet Candy character is a one eighty from Lynn Cameron in Blueprint for Murder, you hardly even recognize her as the same actress. That may be commendable of her acting skills but not for her longevity in the public eye  

Her Candy character was sort of lightning in a bottle. If she could have continued along in that vein her career arc may have been different. Think of the way Marilyn Monroe was sort of pigeon holed/type cast into what we know as your typical Marilyn shtick, she became an icon. Sometimes being type cast is a good thing.

 

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I could have been watching Audrey Dalton..

never realizing that it wasn't Jean Peters.

Both are beauties.

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Eddie had a nice Bernard Herman intro/outro for On Dangerous Ground

Seen the film many times before though, wish we had more obscure, and or Brit/French/International noir in the lineups.  

 

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Every time I see the name Audrey Dalton, I find myself thinking of Abby:

 

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Eddie had a nice Bernard Herman intro/outro for On Dangerous Ground

Seen the film many times before though, wish we had more obscure, and or Brit/French/International noir in the lineups.  

I have seen this a few times, but missed it, I wish I could have seen the intro/outro.

As for the film, this may be Robert Ryan's most intense character ever, considering his filmography that's saying something. Herrmann's score is said to be his personal favorite, it certainly makes you sit up and listen as it assaults you with it's brassiness and intensity. 

You know you are in for something special when it starts off with a wife lovingly helping her husband with his shoulder holster. The city scenes are among the most gritty and tough for that time. Charles Kemper gives a fine performance as Ryan's weary partner, who warns him about taking the job home with him. 

The country scenes are also quite bleak, as the snowy scenes and the angry father played by Ward Bond show us. Ida Lupino is one of the few people in the film with a heart as the sweet blind girl. Ryan is transformed by her kindness while probably remembering the warning he got from Kemper and seeing life can seem better when you have someone loving and caring to share it with. 

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I started watching On Dangerous Ground, but quit when Ryan got to Ida Lupino's house.  Somewhat to hear what a Viola d'amore sounds like.  I had watched it several years ago and just didn't get into it.

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35 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I have seen this a few times, but missed it, I wish I could have seen the intro/outro.

As for the film, this may be Robert Ryan's most intense character ever, considering his filmography that's saying something. Herrmann's score is said to be his personal favorite, it certainly makes you sit up and listen as it assaults you with it's brassiness and intensity. 

You know you are in for something special when it starts off with a wife lovingly helping her husband with his shoulder holster. The city scenes are among the most gritty and tough for that time. Charles Kemper gives a fine performance as Ryan's weary partner, who warns him about taking the job home with him. 

The country scenes are also quite bleak, as the snowy scenes and the angry father played by Ward Bond show us. Ida Lupino is one of the few people in the film with a heart as the sweet blind girl. Ryan is transformed by her kindness while probably remembering the warning he got from Kemper and seeing life can seem better when you have someone loving and caring to share it with. 

I got a hold of this a few years ago in a Noir DVD package. The range of Ida Lupino has always impressed me. This portrayal reminds me a little bit of "High Sierra" and also "Moontide". She pulls this stuff off in a realistic manner without being maudlin. It was only a couple years ago that I found out she had been a polio victim as a teenage actress. This must have given her some extra insight for these kind of roles.

 

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I've now seen On Dangerous Ground several times. I think I like it a bit better every time I watch it. I love the performances, especially of leads Robert Ryan and Ida Lupino. What a couple of fine actors. I believe the only other film they were in together was Beware My Lovely, which, while it has its moments, is not as good a film as On Dangerous Ground.

Contrary to what some of the critics at the time of film's release disliked, I find the dichotomy between the rough urban setting in the first half and the empty snow-filled landscape of the second truly interesting. And, although, as I said, I've seen this noir a number of times, today was the first time I noticed the reversal of the Ryan character's actions. In the city scenes, Ryan is seen hitting, beating up, really, a hood who's withholding information. It's explicitly stated that this is common practice for him.

Yet, in the rural scenes, it is Ryan who urges restraint. He stops Ward Bond's character from roughing up Lupino, and he tries to save her brother. There is a gentleness about him in his scenes with Ida Lupino. I did not find these scenes in the least maudlin, probably due to the honesty of Ryan and Lupino's acting, and how neither of them succumb to the temptation to make these scenes excessive in their emotional power. They are emotionally powerful enough as it is.In fact, On Dangerous Ground may be the only noir I've seen that brings tears to my eyes. (Yikes, maybe I shouldn't have admitted that.)

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16 hours ago, Fedya said:

Every time I see the name Audrey Dalton, I find myself thinking of Abby:

 

AAAH yes! ABBY Dalton!

(...possessive of the THIRD sexiest overbite in entertainment history...after of course Gene Tierney and Joanne Dru!)  ;)

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Have watched On Dangerous Ground a few times in the past, and thought Eddie's pre and post showing tribute to Bernard Herrmann was well done.

But, THIS time while watching it, it occurred to me that it seemed every time Herrmann put that particular "chase" motif into a movie he scored, some killer or killers fall to their death(s) off a CLIFF in the flick! ;)

(...uh-huh, first Lupino's brother character in THIS one, and THEN both Adam Williams AND Martin Landau, James Mason's henchmen, in the SECOND one!)

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A lonely semi-psycho big city cop has to be sent upstate to try to calm his violent tendencies

(IRL at that time he likely would have been given some sort of medal). There he runs

into a temp-psycho seeking to kill his daughter's killer with his big old shotgun. Despite

that premise, things turn out fairly well. The big city cop, with the help of a blind woman,

learns to chill out and relax and the daddy is brought to his senses after the death of the

killer. I liked the rural locale of the second half of the picture and Ida's house was a nice

cozy place, gemutlichkeit galore. Granted the ending was kind of corny, but that's okay.

It also struck me that at least some of the local yokels on their hunt for the killer were just

as dangerous as any big city crook. 

I've noticed while watching certain episodes of The Virginian that the music bears a striking

resemblance to some parts of the Vertigo soundtrack. Weird.

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I've noticed while watching certain episodes of The Virginian that the music bears a striking

resemblance to some parts of the Vertigo soundtrack. Weird.

I noticed while watching Maverick that parts of The Big-Sleep soundtrack were used in an episode.  Both were Warner productions.     

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ON DANGEROUS GROUND (1951)

First time for Looney and I loved it . . . . except the way the ending was handled.  I wouldn't have minded the end if it had been worked better and not as overly soft as it was.  I was fine with him going back to the farm, but I just didn't feel it was done correctly, like there was too much of an immediate emotional response or something.  Having said that Ryan and Lupino in the same movie was going to have to try pretty hard for me to not like it. 

I LOVED the Ryan transition and what the change of scenery and change of cast did.  I think a big key is that Jim Wilson (Ryan) is not only taken out of his environment and thrust into an completely alien domain of unfamiliarity on a physical level, but also a psychological level.  Think how early in the movie he is basically able to, for lack of a better term, bully his way toward whatever goal he is after.  His mere presence intimidates so many he comes into contact with - even his partners to a degree.  Take him out of that environment and introduce him to the Brent's.  Immediately a victims family who doesn't want to talk to him or recognize his authority.  Then Walter Brent bursts on the scene and tries to put Wilson in a subordinate position.  Not only is Wilson out of his element he now has to deal with someone whom immediately announces he doesn't recognize his authority.  The tables are reversed and he is now a subject someone else is trying to bully and intimidate.  Add that with the touch of Lupino and the formula for Jim Wilson to have an epiphany was complete.  It was fantastic.

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I noticed while watching Maverick that parts of The Big-Sleep soundtrack were used in an episode.  Both were Warner productions.     

I don't know if there was any connection in the case of The Virginian, but it is certainly noticeable in

setting the mood in certain scenes. Even funnier in that it's transferred to a bunch of cowpokes

riding around in Wyoming.

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18 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I don't know if there was any connection in the case of The Virginian, but it is certainly noticeable in

setting the mood in certain scenes. Even funnier in that it's transferred to a bunch of cowpokes

riding around in Wyoming.

What's so funny about that, Vautrin.

Guess you never heard James Dreary, ahem, I mean James Drury, would often suffer from vertigo while he sat on his horse.

In fact, word was Lee J. Cobb caught him and/or broke his fall on at least three occasions as he fell off his horse during the run of this series. Uh-huh, TRUE!

(...not)

 

 

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

What's so funny about that, Vautrin.

Guess you never heard James Dreary, ahem, I mean James Drury, would often suffer from vertigo while he sat on his horse.

In fact, word was Lee J. Cobb caught him and/or broke his fall on at least three occasions as he fell off his horse during the run of this series. Uh-huh, TRUE!

(...not)

 

 

Maybe that's why Cobb left the series before it ended. "Damn it, I'm sick and tired of

picking up that gd Drury every other episode. If he was a method actor I wouldn't have

minded, but he thinks he's just playing things naturally." Personally I don't go with the

vertigo theory. Drury wore the same pants and vest for so long they became slick and

he couldn't stay on a horse or a bar stool.

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11 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I don't know if there was any connection in the case of The Virginian, but it is certainly noticeable in

setting the mood in certain scenes. Even funnier in that it's transferred to a bunch of cowpokes

riding around in Wyoming.

The scene in Maverick was where Garner was looking around in a dark room for clues.   This was a very similar scene to the one in The Big Sleep where Bogie, as Marlowe,  goes looking for clues after he has found Geiger shot and Carmen all drugged up.   So that score fit the Maverick scene to a T.

 

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