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Noir Alley

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LOL. That's ok. I dont live near Cleveland (which is much nicer now than years back)......

 

Yes, I've heard this, Hibi.

 

In fact, CBS Sunday Morning did a segment a few months back about Cleveland's turnaround. And I ain't talkin' about that 22 game win streak the Indians are currently enjoying here.

 

Still though of course, when one is going for a "punchline city" like I did down there, there's still probably no better one available than what is sometimes called "The Mistake by the Lake", ya know. ;)

 

(...saaaay, speaking of Cleveland...does anyone know if there's ever been a Noir set there?...now THERE'S a question for ya, eh?!)

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Yes, I've heard this, Hibi.

 

In fact, CBS Sunday Morning did a segment a few months back about Cleveland's turnaround. And I ain't talkin' about that 22 game win streak the Indians are currently enjoying here.

 

Still though of course, when one is going for a "punchline city" like I did down there, there's still probably no better one available than what is sometimes called "The Mistake by the Lake", ya know. ;)

 

(...saaaay, speaking of Cleveland...does anyone know if there's ever been a Noir set there?...now THERE'S a question for ya, eh?!)

 

As you are probably well aware, a turn around can be short-lived.  Especially when nobody goes downtown as planned during the off season.  I don't spend any time downtown there, but despite all kinds of recent renovations, I hear it's gone fairly unused overall.

 

P.S. Maybe if you tweaked The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942) to make it a bit more scary or paranoid, you'd end up with a Noir.  I think that was supposed to be set somewhere around Cleveland.

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As you are probably well aware, a turn around can be short-lived.  Especially when nobody goes downtown as planned during the off season.  I don't spend any time downtown there, but despite all kinds of recent renovations, I hear it's gone fairly unused overall.

 

P.S. Maybe if you tweaked The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942) to make it a bit more scary or paranoid, you'd end up with a Noir.  I think that was supposed to be set somewhere around Cleveland.

 

Hmmmm...I dunno, MCOH. Seems to me you'd really have to tweak The Man Who Came to Dinner quite a bit in order to make it anywhere close to Noir-ish.

 

I mean try as I might, and because he was usually in much lighter fare, I just can't see Monty Woolley in that sort of genre at all. ;)

 

(...and btw, according to Wiki, this film's setting is actually the imaginary town of "Mesalia" Ohio, a supposed "small town" in that state, but with no mention of it being located near any of the larger cities within Ohio)

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Maybe if you tweaked The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942) to make it a bit more scary or paranoid, you'd end up with a Noir.  I think that was supposed to be set somewhere around Cleveland.

 

It might have become more of a noir if we had actually seen what Jimmy Durante would do with that loaf of rye bread if he got it alone with nurse Mary Wickes.

 

the-man-who-came-to-dinner.jpg

 

"You're beautiful! You're gorgeous! I want to make a meat sandwich out of you!"

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Hmmmm...I dunno, MCOH. Seems to me you'd really have to tweak The Man Who Came to Dinner quite a bit in order to make it anywhere close to Noir-ish.

 

I mean try as I might, and because he was usually in much lighter fare, I just can't see Monty Woolley in that sort of genre at all. ;)

 

(...and btw, according to Wiki, this film's setting is actually the imaginary town of "Mesalia" Ohio, a supposed "small town" in that state, but with no mention of it being located near any of the larger cities within Ohio)

 

Some judicious use of B-roll.  Replace the happy music with shots of night-time rain, wet sidewalks and empty streets, someone walking down the street alone, post-production ADR work of a Monty Wooley impersonator saying "I don't know what came upon me that fateful night, I don''t know why I did it".  It would probably have the continuity of a lesser film like The Beast Of Yucca Flats though.

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I'm SO DOWN with this MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER film noir...

 

There are quite a few comedies, romantic and otherwise, that Walk a fine line...

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re: In A Lonely Place It's a good Hollywood Noir, and about the same Hollywood sleaze balls, and tragic figures, we got around today, only back then they were giving us classy crap but now they are giving us mostly, just the crap.  

 

I see it similar to A Streetcar Named Desire, it's the dark side of life, an early psychological noir, one of the strands Noir unwinded into after the demise of the glue of the MPPC. One is as Noir as the other. And Streetcar is much more stylistic visually

 

"I told my story better." Another nice classic line. 

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IN A LONELY PLACE, the 1947 novel by DOROTHY B HUGHES (ahem) was recently reprinted in a snazzy new edition with a foreward by someone whose name I did not recognize. It came out August 15.

 

the amazon link is below if anyone's game...

(it can also be gotten on kindle for those of you with no souls)

 

https://www.amazon.com/Lonely-Place-York-Review-Books/dp/1681371472/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1505496609&sr=1-1&keywords=in+a+lonely+place+dorothy+b+hughes

 

I just got the book in the mail yesterday and will start reading it tonight. It's published by the New York Review of Books with an afterword by Megan Abbott who is " the author of 'The Street was Mine', a study of hard-boiled fiction and film noir and the editor of 'A Hell of a Woman' , a female crime fiction anthology." And I'm quoting that from the inside cover. It's an elegant little edition.

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The original ending would have been way noir-er, though. Would have overcome its lack of great visuals. 

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I liked the ending of "In A Lonely Place" better than what was originally shot, which would have seemed too far-fetched and coincidental for many audiences, although what the final product turned out to be also carried a level of coincidence too.

 

Bogart was pretty good in this.  He vacillated between a normal, attentive fellow who was also a wisen-heimer and a major phallic symbol.  Grahame was smokin' hot too.  That early scene when she walks across the courtyard of her apartment complex showing off the effects of a bullet bra harkened me back to Bob Seger's "Night Moves" (points all her own, sittin' way up high)!

 

The end wrap by Eddie was cool.  I had read about Gloria Grahame marrying her step-son, but I had no idea the kid hitch-hiked from New York to L.A. at the age of 13 and met his step-mom under the circumstances Eddie described.  Audrey Totter was the second-string QB on stand-by in case Grahame didn't work out in this picture, and she would have been a great choice for the role of Laurel Gray too.  It's little nuggets of info you get on these TCM wrap-arounds that make this station more valuable than Fort Knox (at least, for me anyway)!

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The original ending would have been way noir-er, though. Would have overcome its lack of great visuals. 

 

 

YES!!!!!

 

I am SO FIRMLY #TEAMORIGINALENDING.

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Eddie sells it pretty hard, don't he?

 

 

So much so that I'm not going to laundry list my issues with the film (which I just watched AGAIN)...

 

(i think i've seen it at least 8 times or so by now)

 

I just HAVE to admit, I don't think there is any other title out there in all filmdom that I do not like EVEN AFTER TRYING REALLY HARD TO- and in spite of positive notices from several people whose opinions I value highly and with whom I am generally simpatico- than IN A LONELY PLACE.

 

I feel like everyone's looking at GUERNICA and all I see is dogs playing poker....

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The original ending would have been way noir-er, though. Would have overcome its lack of great visuals. 

 

and i keep thinking- when I'm watching IN A LONELY PLACE- "Nic Ray could do some damn visuals! why isn't he doing them here?!"

 

I think of those wonderful overhead (helicopter?) shots from THEY LIVE BY NIGHT; and the sweeping, balletic glide of the characters in JOHNNY GUITAR, and even the original ending to REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE- before Warners decided to switch from black and white to color- where he had the closing dome of the Griffith Observatory end the film in blackness- HE REALLY KNEW HOW TO MOVE A CAMERA and there's just none of that in IN A LONELY PLACE...and it could've used it.

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So much so that I'm not going to laundry list my issues with the film (which I just watched AGAIN)...

 

(i think i've seen it at least 8 times or so by now)

 

I just HAVE to admit, I don't think there is any other title out there in all filmdom that I do not like EVEN AFTER TRYING REALLY HARD TO- and in spite of positive notices from several people whose opinions I value highly and with whom I am generally simpatico- than IN A LONELY PLACE.

 

I feel like everyone's looking at GUERNICA and all I see is dogs playing poker....

 

To quote Sam Cooke, Lorna...."You Send Me"!!!  :lol: 

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So much so that I'm not going to laundry list my issues with the film (which I just watched AGAIN)...

 

(i think i've seen it at least 8 times or so by now)

 

I just HAVE to admit, I don't think there is any other title out there in all filmdom that I do not like EVEN AFTER TRYING REALLY HARD TO- and in spite of positive notices from several people whose opinions I value highly and with whom I am generally simpatico- than IN A LONELY PLACE.

 

I feel like everyone's looking at GUERNICA and all I see is dogs playing poker....

What a GREAT post

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So much so that I'm not going to laundry list my issues with the film (which I just watched AGAIN)...

 

(i think i've seen it at least 8 times or so by now)

 

I just HAVE to admit, I don't think there is any other title out there in all filmdom that I do not like EVEN AFTER TRYING REALLY HARD TO- and in spite of positive notices from several people whose opinions I value highly and with whom I am generally simpatico- than IN A LONELY PLACE.

 

I feel like everyone's looking at GUERNICA and all I see is dogs playing poker....

Sort of agree with you.  I watched it just to hear the introduction and closeout.  Then got suckered into watching it again even though I have it on DVD.  It does hold my attention.  Actually I kind of hate when they show alternate endings for movies.

I think it is a good movie, but not one of the best Noir's by a long shot.  To me, it is more a mystery/romance movie.

Gloria Graham was good in it and while I like Audrey Trotter, not sure she would have been better.

Also, maybe the Bogart character gets more sympathy from viewers because he is Bogart?  As opposed to the hard core criminal he was in some other movies, such as Petrified Forest.

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It was also interesting to hear Eddie note in his introduction that 1950 is, in his opinion, THE BEST YEAR FOR MOVIES IN THE HISTORY OF HOLLYWOOD, and here we are more simpatico (although, I personally have greater fondness in my shriveled black heart for 1940 and 1943 collectively.)

 

He's on solid ground with this one- just speaking in terms of films noir alone- SUNSET BLVD., TENSION, D.O.A., THE ASPHALT JUNGLE, NO MAN OF HER OWN (the one with Stanwyck- which BTW, would make a great inclusion on Noir Alley), THE FILE ON THELMA JORDAN, CAGED (**to some degree here I know), THE THIRD MAN (kinda sorta here also because I know it really came out in 1949), KIND HEARTS AND CORONETS (even more kinda sorta on multiple fronts here, not only because it is also 1949 and not really "classic" noir, but it's as close to a noir as a British period comedy will get, but it's got a black soul and it's well done and I include it so sue me), WINCHESTER '73 (a western noir), THE FURIES (ditto), THE AFOREMENTIONED IN A LONELY PLACE, and of course a little film called THE DAMNED DON'T CRY starring CRAWFORD as- oH what was her character's name in it???

 

1947-1949 were dim, murky years- kind of a watershed period in cinema- and while there were some great films made during those three years, it seems as if there weren't as many as had come before. 1950 was the year where film really found its footing again.

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Yes, I've heard this, Hibi.

 

In fact, CBS Sunday Morning did a segment a few months back about Cleveland's turnaround. And I ain't talkin' about that 22 game win streak the Indians are currently enjoying here.

 

Still though of course, when one is going for a "punchline city" like I did down there, there's still probably no better one available than what is sometimes called "The Mistake by the Lake", ya know. ;)

 

(...saaaay, speaking of Cleveland...does anyone know if there's ever been a Noir set there?...now THERE'S a question for ya, eh?!)

 

 

Beats me, but there are parts of the city that are definitely "noirish". The downtown area though, has turned around nicely.

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