Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

If you liked Lady in the Lake, then you may like Dark Passage, it employs the same first person perspective that 'Lady' uses.  Dark Passage has a couple scenes that could be considered violent.  I am not sure what your violence threshold is and what "violent" means to you.

I believe Hulu also has TCM.  You have to subscribe to their live TV. That is what Lorna uses to access TCM.

I do have Netflix but dropped the DVD component awhile back.  My problem is that I have so many things to watch that the Netflix DVD just sat on my TV stand for weeks, maybe even months, before I watched it. If I watched it.  I could have purchased the movie by then.  I find that the library and DVR works better for me cost-wise. 

Unless they changed it, Netflix's plan was x amount of disks at a time and you could rent as many as you wanted each month--if you watched 2 movies or 10 movies, it was up to you. You fill up your queue with films, prioritize what you wanted to see and as soon as you returned your disk, they'd send the next available film in your queue. 

Speedy--

And thanks for bringing that to my attention.

I've seen both films at different times and wondered why I couldn't stand either one of them.

The Robert Montgomery film is really boring, but I have to admit it's hard not to enjoy a few scenes with Bogie.

"Dark Passage" may be one of the few films where he stars in that I find difficult to stick with because it loses my interest early on.

In all fairness, I usually chalk up the dullness of "Dark Passage" to the blacklisting environment that Hollywood was being harassed with at that time during the McCarthy era.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

As one who recalls seeing most of the episodes when they were first run (and faithfully plopping my a** in front of the tube when it came on) I always tried to catch any reruns of it over the years.  It was then that it came to light the show also featured early work of many who went on to bigger and better things.  

There was one episode in which VIC MORROW played a guy trying to become a cop, like his Father before him.  Another one in which a very young DUSTIN HOFFMAN could be seen pulling a diner "hold up" which was foiled by a guy pretending to be a beat cop.  I've also noticed ROBERT DUVALL  and a young WILLIAM SHATNER in some old episodes. 

Cool show.  It's due for another round of syndication IMHO.  ;)

Sepiatone

For whatever reason Naked City flew below my radar. Or around it. I had heard of it of course,

but that's about all. I would like to see it, especially as it's a show I've haven't seen. Yes a lot of

those actors you mention show up on many of the TV shows of that time. It's fun to see them

as young actors just starting out. I just saw Shatner doing a commercial for CPAP machines.

Anyone have a bunch of oily rags? 

The hour long episodes of Gunsmoke do have a lot of additional elements that have little to do

with two fisted action, but I still like them. Doc is always a kick. Except for Kitty he couldn't

get along with anyone. Some are also on the pessimistic side, where Matt doesn't come to the

rescue every time. Insp has been playing The Virginian for a number of years. They have so

many commercials that you're no longer truly watching a 90 minute show.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Speedy--

And thanks for bringing that to my attention.

I've seen both films at different times and wondered why I couldn't stand either one of them.

The Robert Montgomery film is really boring, but I have to admit it's hard not to enjoy a few scenes with Bogie.

"Dark Passage" may be one of the few films where he stars in that I find difficult to stick with because it loses my interest early on.

In all fairness, I usually chalk up the dullness of "Dark Passage" to the blacklisting environment that Hollywood was being harassed with at that time during the McCarthy era.

Sounds like I liked both of these films more than you did. Lady in the Lake is an odd film.  I can understand why someone might find it boring.  I didn't like it the first time I saw it either.  However, the more times I see it, it kind of grows on me.  That may have to do with my watching more Robert Montgomery films and also discovering Audrey Totter last year during her SUTS day.

I really liked Dark Passage. Of the first person perspective films, I think Dark Passage is the better of the two.  First, I like Bogie and Bacall and I love Agnes Moorehead.  But I also find this film interesting solely for the idea that a man, would randomly agree to radical plastic surgery at 3am to be performed by a surgeon who lost his license--solely based on the recommendation of a nosy cab driver! Bogie is desperate for sure.

Moorehead is fantastic in this film. And her demise is controversial.  Suicide? Many of us here on the boards said yes. Bogie tells Bacall that Moorehead had an accident. 

I also love the SF scenery and Bacall's apartment is awesome. I want her credenza with the built in record player.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Dark Passage, but it is not your typical "crime/mystery" movie. A lot more of the human interest of Bogie and Bacall characters getting to know each other and of course falling in love.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Vautrin said:

For whatever reason Naked City flew below my radar. Or around it. I had heard of it of course,

but that's about all. I would like to see it, especially as it's a show I've haven't seen. Yes a lot of

those actors you mention show up on many of the TV shows of that time. It's fun to see them

as young actors just starting out. I just saw Shatner doing a commercial for CPAP machines.

Anyone have a bunch of oily rags? 

The hour long episodes of Gunsmoke do have a lot of additional elements that have little to do

with two fisted action, but I still like them. Doc is always a kick. Except for Kitty he couldn't

get along with anyone. Some are also on the pessimistic side, where Matt doesn't come to the

rescue every time. Insp has been playing The Virginian for a number of years. They have so

many commercials that you're no longer truly watching a 90 minute show.

 

I think maybe BONANZA had a lot to do with GUNSMOKE extending to hour long episodes and content.  The former was always about more than just cattle ranchers, and hour long westerns with a storyline  seemed to be more attractive to TV audiences than just a half hour of "shoot 'em up".  And the competition of the hour long THE UNTOUCHABLES episodes might have caused "The Naked City". lengthening their show too.

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Moorehead is fantastic in this film. And her demise is controversial.  Suicide? Many of us here on the boards said yes. Bogie tells Bacall that Moorehead had an accident. 

 

Suicide? I doubt it. It was an awfully fast decision on Madge's part if that was the case.

Bogie's character was right. Her fall was an accident.

If I remember correctly, though, the scene is rather abruptly edited so that may play a role in the differences of opinion about her death.

One of the many reasons why I like Dark Passage is because of Bogart playing a role against type. Unlike his first two films with Bacall in which Bogie was portraying a super cool, independent guy (the tough guy Bogart screen persona) in this film he is alone and scared and must lean upon a number of other people in order to escape the law. Without Bacall, without the cabbie, without the plastic surgeon he would be quite helpless. Bogie is anything but "cool" in this film, paying a more recognizably human guy whose fear (and helplessness) is something with which members of an audience can identify.

Of course his scenes with Bacall in Dark Passage (in particular the film's memorable final scene) are in true fantasy movie romantic mode to give us that Bogie-Bacall screen magic that their fans lap up. The musical accompaniment of the popular hit "Too Marvelous For Words" in many of those scenes plays a big role in that aura of romance.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TomJH said:

Suicide? I doubt it. It was an awfully fast decision on Madge's part if that was the case.

Bogie's character was right. Her fall was an accident.

If I remember correctly, though, the scene is rather abruptly edited so that may play a role in the differences of opinion about her death.

It seems like she wouldn't have had enough room to fall out the window though.  She was only a few inches from the window, I find it hard to believe that she would trip and fall with enough force to break the glass.  She also grabs something from the desk before she "falls" out the window. I figured that she hated Bogart THAT much, that she was willing to kill herself just to screw him over. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TomJH said:

Suicide? I doubt it. It was an awfully fast decision on Madge's part if that was the case.

Bogie's character was right. Her fall was an accident.

If I remember correctly, though, the scene is rather abruptly edited so that may play a role in the differences of opinion about her death.

One of the many reasons why I like Dark Passage is because of Bogart playing a role against type. Unlike his first two films with Bacall in which Bogie was portraying a super cool, independent guy (the tough guy Bogart screen persona) in this film he is alone and scared and must lean upon a number of other people in order to escape the law. Without Bacall, without the cabbie, without the plastic surgeon he would be quite helpless. Bogie is anything but "cool" in this film, paying a more recognizably human guy whose fear (and helplessness) is something with which members of an audience can identify.

Of course his scenes with Bacall in Dark Passage (in particular the film's memorable final scene) are in true fantasy movie romantic mode to give us that Bogie-Bacall screen magic that their fans lap up. The musical accompaniment of the popular hit "Too Marvelous For Words" in many of those scenes plays a big role in that aura of romance.

And speaking of the "musical accompaniment" aspect here...

I've thought for some time now that one of the reasons Dark Passage seems to better satisfy the viewer than does the other first-person perspective camera gimmick-ed film Lady in the Lake IS because of Robert Montgomery's choice in the latter to use the wordless choral music instead of the usual orchestral instrumental one.

And, which is something I've come to find a little off-putting about LITL, as that chorus just begins to grate by the film's end.

(...at least to my ears, anyway)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of Robert Montgomery and noir, I had the pleasure recently of seeing him in the other film noir he's most famous for, Ride the Pink Horse.

I have a feeling this is one of those old films that's not allowed to be shown in Canada, not via TCM anyway. But the Toronto Film Society was able to screen it in the first of their double-features running weekly all summer - it's a kind of summer-long noir festival called "Black and White and Noir  All Over".

The first movie was a noir I'd never seen and knew very little about: Undertow. (Typical noir title, eh?) It was pretty darn good, I enjoyed it. Kind of typical noir plot - an innocent, sympathetic guy is framed for a murder, of course the police believe, due to carefully rigged fake evidence by the bad guys, that he's the killer, and the innocent protagonist, who of course can't just go to the police and 'splain everything, because they won't believe him, spends most of the screen time trying to find the real killer to prove his innocence.  (Did I make that wordy enough?)

I didn't know any of the actors in it, except for Bruce Bennett, who plays the main police detective, and also happens to be the hero's friend. But guess what? The actor who plays the protagonist ("Tony") is someone called Scot Brady - who, it turns out, was Lawrence Tierney's brother !

It also had some nice noirish settings and cinematography. I believe most of it was filmed in -studio (Universal), but some of it really looked like on-location scenes in Chicago. (Chicago is one of my favourite noir cities.)

Oh, how could I forget this tidbit - - the director of Undertow is none other than William Castle ! Yes, he of "13 Ghosts" and many other flakey but really amusing "scary" movies. I guess Undertow was made before Mr. Castle found his true forte. (1949)

Anyway, it's one of those quite short noirs (about 70 minutes, I think). Despite it's somewhat formulaic story, I really enjoyed it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, that last post, I started talking about Ride the Pink Horse and then spent the whole rest of the post talking about another movie. But by the time I finished my comments on Undertow, the post was too long to continue with writing up another movie.

Besides, Ride the Pink Horse deserves its own post. So, this noir was made in 1947 and directed by its star, Robert Montgomery (as you all know, he also directed Lady in the Lake.) But don't worry, Ride the Pink Horse is not filmed in subjective camera style.

The story's set in New Mexico (although I didn't realize this till after I'd seen it; the whole time, I thought it was supposed to be set in Mexico, without the "New".) Montgomery is seen descending from a bus, he enters the depot and carefully puts something in a locker, then he buys a stick of gum (!), chews it a bit, then uses the gum to stick the locker key in a hiding place no one will notice. I thought this was an original and charming bit of business.

Anyway, I don't like going into plot a lot. Suffice to say, it involves an old friend who was probably murdered, a gangster who probably did the murdering, a potential blackmail scheme, and a very beautiful young Mexican girl who seems inexplicably compelled to help Montgomery and follows him around everywhere in the dusty little Mexican (ok, New Mexico) town.

There's also Thomas Gomez, who's a riot as the  hard drinking, disheveled, and dirty-looking carousel proprietor who may or may not have a heart of gold. That's also where we first see the sweet and mysterious young Mexican girl, Pila (played by Wanda Hendrix. I'd never heard of Wanda Hendrix before. I looked her up, and apparently she was in quite a few films, but I've never heard of any of them.)

Fred Clark plays Frank Hugo, the gangster boss who Montgomery's character wants to see, either to blackmail him or demand justice for his murdered friend, or both. This actor - Fred Clark - was in White Heat. It's a small but key role; he plays the "trader" who meets with Cody Jarrett to discuss money-laundering Cody's stolen bank notes. (You might remember him as the guy who poses as a fisherman, sports hat and all.)  I don't know why the Hugo character is listed so far down on the cast list in the wikipaedia article, as he is an extremely important character, and has quite a few scenes. He should be near the top of the cast list. There's something very unusual about his gangster character, but I'll leave that for you who haven't seen the film to discover.

I don't know what it is about Robert Montgomery...I do like him, and I liked him in this film too. However, he seemed to think that, at least in his crime movie roles, he had to adopt a bad-tempered, rude persona. I think he believed this persona made him come across as tough. But it just makes him seem rude and ill-tempered and kind of mean, often for no discernible reason. Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, Dana Andrews - these actors and many others were able to deliver their hard-boiled noirish dialogue in such a way that they seemed cynical and shrewd, nobody's fool - - but not rude. But for some reason, when Robert Montgomery speaks his lines in these films, he just sounds really crabby to me.

Having said that, I still like him and I liked him in Ride the Pink Horse. I actually really want to explain that title, but some things are more fun to discover in the watching. I'll just say, if anyone's mind goes to a naughty place when they hear that title, they are mistaken, and they should get their sordid minds out of the gutter. Me, of course I never once laughed at that title, or thought it was unseemly in any way. But then, I'm a pure-minded sort of lady.

Anyway, Ride the Pink Horse is filled with lots of bizarre characters, oddly disturbing scenes (like the enormous puppet in the fiesta float - the entire story-line takes place during some big fiesta), and lots of tough dialogue. On all these fronts it's satisfyingly noir-ish.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

However, he seemed to think that, at least in his crime movie roles, he had to adopt a bad-tempered, rude persona.

Sounds kind of like Lawrence Tierney.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, povgramps said:

Sounds kind of like Lawrence Tierney.

Yeah, Lawrence Tierney always came across as not only menacing, but ill-tempered.  Just to clarify, although maybe you already knew this, that the actor Scott Brady, who was Lawrence Tierney's brother, was in the film Undertow. And he's actually quite sympathetic in his role, not cranky or bad-tempered at all.

The actor I was saying strikes me as delivering his lines in an unnecessarily rude and ill-tempered way is actually Robert Montgomery. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

The actor I was saying strikes me as delivering his lines in an unnecessarily rude and ill-tempered way is actually Robert Montgomery.

Was he related to the beautiful Elizabeth?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Yeah, Lawrence Tierney always came across as not only menacing, but ill-tempered.  Just to clarify, although maybe you already knew this, that the actor Scott Brady, who was Lawrence Tierney's brother, was in the film Undertow. And he's actually quite sympathetic in his role, not cranky or bad-tempered at all.

The actor I was saying strikes me as delivering his lines in an unnecessarily rude and ill-tempered way is actually Robert Montgomery. 

While I know what you mean about Robert Montgomery's manner of speaking in the films where he comes across as a "tough guy" here MissW, except for his role as the boxer in Here Come Mr. Jordan and where he sort of makes it endearing, I've always felt his affecting that "New York street tough" accent in his noir film roles usually just comes across as more fake than anything, and as if he's really a "college man" attempting to pass himself and his character off as streetwise.

(...if ya's know what I mean) ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Pila (played by Wanda Hendrix. I'd never heard of Wanda Hendrix before. I looked her up, and apparently she was in quite a few films, but I've never heard of any of them.)

Her other good Film Soleil/Noir is Highway Dragnet (1954) with Richard Conte and Joan Bennett. Hendrix plays a fashion model, Bennett the fashion photographer, and Conte a GI falsely accused of murdering a blond bimbo in Vegas. Its got a cool ending in a surreal looking half sunken resort in the Salton Sea. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

So, that last post, I started talking about Ride the Pink Horse and then spent the whole rest of the post talking about another movie. But by the time I finished my comments on Undertow, the post was too long to continue with writing up another movie.

Besides, Ride the Pink Horse deserves its own post. So, this noir was made in 1947 and directed by its star, Robert Montgomery (as you all know, he also directed Lady in the Lake.) But don't worry, Ride the Pink Horse is not filmed in subjective camera style.

The story's set in New Mexico (although I didn't realize this till after I'd seen it; the whole time, I thought it was supposed to be set in Mexico, without the "New".) Montgomery is seen descending from a bus, he enters the depot and carefully puts something in a locker, then he buys a stick of gum (!), chews it a bit, then uses the gum to stick the locker key in a hiding place no one will notice. I thought this was an original and charming bit of business.

 

Parts of this movie were actually filmed in beautiful Santa Fe New Mexico, Miss W, the capital of that state, and the hotel featured in some of the scenes it would be the famous La Fonda Hotel located right in the heart of the old town section.

And what I find somewhat strange is that in this film, the city's name was fictionalized to "San Pablo", and have to wonder why this was.

(...I dunno...perhaps the city fathers and/or the Santa Fe Chamber of Commence voiced some objections to the use of the actual town name and due to the underworld associated plot?...maybe so)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Parts of this movie were actually filmed in beautiful Santa Fe New Mexico, Miss W, the capital of that state, and the hotel featured in some of the scenes it would be the famous La Fonda Hotel located right in the heart of the old town section.

And what I find somewhat strange is that in this film, the city's name was fictionalized to "San Pablo", and have to wonder why this was.

(...I dunno...perhaps the city fathers and/or the Santa Fe Chamber of Commence voiced some objections to the use of the actual town name and due to the underworld associated plot?...maybe so)

Interesting, Dargo. It didn't look much like a "beautiful" city to me, more like a dusty shabby sketchy Mexican village. Of course, that's I guess the look Montgomery and the producers were going for. The only glamourous place in the little town is the hotel.

So maybe the filmmakers didn't want the locale to seem like a sophisticated city, but, as I said, like a dusty, vaguely dangerous-looking  small-ish town.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Dargo said:

While I know what you mean about Robert Montgomery's manner of speaking in the films where he comes across as a "tough guy" here MissW, except for his role as the boxer in Here Come Mr. Jordan and where he sort of makes it endearing, I've always felt his affecting that "New York street tough" accent in his noir film roles usually just comes across as more fake than anything, and as if he's really a "college man" attempting to pass himself and his character off as streetwise.

(...if ya's know what I mean) ;)

So, you're speculating that Robert Montgomery in his actor's imagination provided a "back story" for his noir characters, one where the hero was some college dude and has to talk that way to pass himself off as a genuine tough guy?

Well, whatever the explanation for it is, unfortunately it doesn't work for me. I just keep thinking, "why is he so angry at everyone?" And not "angry" as in "angry young man" or even cynical tough guy who doesn't buy the load of fake goods someone might be trying to sell him. Nope, more "angry" as in grouchy and peevish. 

And yet !  I do like this actor. I just wish someone had sat him down and said, "Bob, you don't have to be so cranky in your noir roles, you know. Ya wanna come across as tough, not grouchy or mean."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Interesting, Dargo. It didn't look much like a "beautiful" city to me, more like a dusty shabby sketchy Mexican village. Of course, that's I guess the look Montgomery and the producers were going for. The only glamourous place in the little town is the hotel.

So maybe the filmmakers didn't want the locale to seem like a sophisticated city, but, as I said, like a dusty, vaguely dangerous-looking  small-ish town.

My wife and I visited Santa Fe in 2015, and while I'm not sure which or how many scenes in this movie were also and according the IMDb website filmed at the Universal Studios in SoCal (perhaps those featuring the dusty shabby Mexican village being within that studio's lot), I can assure you that today's Santa Fe is a lovely city worth a visit by anybody.

(...and of course there's also the possibility that back in 1947 and when this film was shot, Santa Fe might still have had a dusty and shabby section of it, but not so much anymore...well, not as far as we saw anyway)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Dargo said:

My wife and I visited Santa Fe in 2015, and while I'm not sure which or how many scenes in this movie were also and according the IMDb website were filmed at the Universal Studios in SoCal (perhaps those featuring the dusty shabby Mexican village within that studio lot), I can assure you that today's Santa Fe is a lovely city worth a visit by anybody.

My wife and I were also in Sante Fe in May of 2015;  yes,  very nice and quaint city.   Downtown is really nice to walk around in and there are many fine art galleries (and a few newer ones that don't just have southwestern art).

As for the acting of Montgomery in noirs;  The character he plays in RTPH is a returning war vet - it is a common noir theme to have such a character being bitter.    How one expresses this bitterness is typically as a cynic (Bogie in Key Largo),  or like Montgomery, with anger.

In LITL;  I assume Montgomery saw Murder My Sweet with Dick Powell.  Hey,  if a crooner can act all tough,,,, well,  why not me!

  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

So, you're speculating that Robert Montgomery in his actor's imagination provided a "back story" for his noir characters, one where the hero was some college dude and has to talk that way to pass himself off as a genuine tough guy?

Well, whatever the explanation for it is, unfortunately it doesn't work for me. I just keep thinking, "why is he so angry at everyone?" And not "angry" as in "angry young man" or even cynical tough guy who doesn't buy the load of fake goods someone might be trying to sell him. Nope, more "angry" as in grouchy and peevish. 

And yet !  I do like this actor. I just wish someone had sat him down and said, "Bob, you don't have to be so cranky in your noir roles, you know. Ya wanna come across as tough, not grouchy or mean."

Kind'a sort'a, but not that Montgomery the actor purposely is thinking the character he's playing is a "college man" and then affecting the tough guy NYC accent, but really more the thought that Montgomery the actor just overdoes it a bit too much and thus projects more the "cranky" and "angry" aspect to such a character and it then seeming fake and/or a bit unbelievable and not fully fleshed out and verging on "shtick", and this especially coming out of the mouth of an actor who pretty much DOES look like a "college man".

(...and kind of like how Cigar Joe feels about Sheldon Leonard's tough guy NYC street/mobster shtick...he doesn't believe THAT actor sounds "real" either...ain't that right, Joe!) ;) 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

So, that last post, I started talking about Ride the Pink Horse and then spent the whole rest of the post talking about another movie. But by the time I finished my comments on Undertow, the post was too long to continue with writing up another movie.

Besides, Ride the Pink Horse deserves its own post. So, this noir was made in 1947 and directed by its star, Robert Montgomery (as you all know, he also directed Lady in the Lake.) But don't worry, Ride the Pink Horse is not filmed in subjective camera style.

The story's set in New Mexico (although I didn't realize this till after I'd seen it; the whole time, I thought it was supposed to be set in Mexico, without the "New".) Montgomery is seen descending from a bus, he enters the depot and carefully puts something in a locker, then he buys a stick of gum (!), chews it a bit, then uses the gum to stick the locker key in a hiding place no one will notice. I thought this was an original and charming bit of business.

Anyway, I don't like going into plot a lot. Suffice to say, it involves an old friend who was probably murdered, a gangster who probably did the murdering, a potential blackmail scheme, and a very beautiful young Mexican girl who seems inexplicably compelled to help Montgomery and follows him around everywhere in the dusty little Mexican (ok, New Mexico) town.

There's also Thomas Gomez, who's a riot as the  hard drinking, disheveled, and dirty-looking carousel proprietor who may or may not have a heart of gold. That's also where we first see the sweet and mysterious young Mexican girl, Pila (played by Wanda Hendrix. I'd never heard of Wanda Hendrix before. I looked her up, and apparently she was in quite a few films, but I've never heard of any of them.)

Fred Clark plays Frank Hugo, the gangster boss who Montgomery's character wants to see, either to blackmail him or demand justice for his murdered friend, or both. This actor - Fred Clark - was in White Heat. It's a small but key role; he plays the "trader" who meets with Cody Jarrett to discuss money-laundering Cody's stolen bank notes. (You might remember him as the guy who poses as a fisherman, sports hat and all.)  I don't know why the Hugo character is listed so far down on the cast list in the wikipaedia article, as he is an extremely important character, and has quite a few scenes. He should be near the top of the cast list. There's something very unusual about his gangster character, but I'll leave that for you who haven't seen the film to discover.

I don't know what it is about Robert Montgomery...I do like him, and I liked him in this film too. However, he seemed to think that, at least in his crime movie roles, he had to adopt a bad-tempered, rude persona. I think he believed this persona made him come across as tough. But it just makes him seem rude and ill-tempered and kind of mean, often for no discernible reason. Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, Dana Andrews - these actors and many others were able to deliver their hard-boiled noirish dialogue in such a way that they seemed cynical and shrewd, nobody's fool - - but not rude. But for some reason, when Robert Montgomery speaks his lines in these films, he just sounds really crabby to me.

Having said that, I still like him and I liked him in Ride the Pink Horse. I actually really want to explain that title, but some things are more fun to discover in the watching. I'll just say, if anyone's mind goes to a naughty place when they hear that title, they are mistaken, and they should get their sordid minds out of the gutter. Me, of course I never once laughed at that title, or thought it was unseemly in any way. But then, I'm a pure-minded sort of lady.

Anyway, Ride the Pink Horse is filled with lots of bizarre characters, oddly disturbing scenes (like the enormous puppet in the fiesta float - the entire story-line takes place during some big fiesta), and lots of tough dialogue. On all these fronts it's satisfyingly noir-ish.

Your review of the film inspired me to place a transfer request for it at the library.  I'll let you know what I think when I get a chance to see it.

I agree with you re: Montgomery.  I like him but he does seem to try too hard to seem tough.  It's almost like he's doing an impression of a stereotypical noir detective. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dargo said:

My wife and I visited Santa Fe in 2015, and while I'm not sure which or how many scenes in this movie were also and according the IMDb website filmed at the Universal Studios in SoCal (perhaps those featuring the dusty shabby Mexican village being within that studio's lot), I can assure you that today's Santa Fe is a lovely city worth a visit by anybody.

(...and of course there's also the possibility that back in 1947 and when this film was shot, Santa Fe might still have had a dusty and shabby section of it, but not so much anymore...well, not as far as we saw anyway)

Dargs, of course I wasn't saying that Santa Fe is like that now - or even was then (that is "dusty and sketchy-looking".) As you yourself acknowledge, the film was made in 1947; the town /city may have been very different then. 

And I would not for one moment argue that Sante Fe is now or was then an ugly or dirty little village. How the frig would I know, I've never been anywhere near it. I believe your description of it as "a lovely city worth a visit".

I was just saying, if it was actually filmed on location in Sante Fe, they did a good job making it look dirty and run-down etc. (except for the aforesaid hotel.) Maybe you're right, maybe it was mostly shot on studio locations. Probably.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...