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Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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"What do you mean I sound like an angry Robert Montgomery? He sounds like me!"

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"Just face it, Bub, you do! And one more thing, IT'S RABBIT SEASON!!!!"

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9 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I think maybe BONANZA had a lot to do with GUNSMOKE extending to hour long episodes and content.  The former was always about more than just cattle ranchers, and hour long westerns with a storyline  seemed to be more attractive to TV audiences than just a half hour of "shoot 'em up".  And the competition of the hour long THE UNTOUCHABLES episodes might have caused "The Naked City". lengthening their show too.

Sepiatone

That could be, though on the other hand Gunsmoke took a while to convert to color in 1966.

Yes, Bonanza always dealt with other issues than mere gun fights. From what I recall, the

Cartwrights were kind of tough hombres at the beginning of the series but they mellowed over

the years. 

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30 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

That could be, though on the other hand Gunsmoke took a while to convert to color in 1966.

Yes, Bonanza always dealt with other issues than mere gun fights. From what I recall, the

Cartwrights were kind of tough hombres at the beginning of the series but they mellowed over

the years. 

Well, that's what the love of a good woman (who'll usually end up dying at about the 54:00 minute mark of every episode they're in) will do to a guy, ya know!  ;)

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Her other good Film Soleil/Noir is Highway Dragnet (1954) with Richard Conte and Joan Bennett. Hendrix plays a fashion model, Bennett the fashion photographer, and Conte a GI falsely accused of murdering a blond bimbo in Vegas. Its got a cool ending in a surreal looking half sunken resort in the Salton Sea. 

I recently got the DVD of this one and have watched it a couple of times.  I would rate it about a 7/10.  The ending is actually in Richard Conte's former home on the banks of the Salton Sea.  Apparently it supposedly flooded very easily.

I looked up Salton Sea and apparently it is no longer much of a resort and lots of abandoned buildings.

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Well, that's what the love of a good woman (who'll usually end up dying at about the 54:00 minute mark of every episode they're in) will do to a guy, ya know!  ;)

Plus getting a lot of gray hairs. Yep, being engaged to a Cartwright was pretty much a death

sentence. If I recall it correctly though, Joe married a woman but she was killed shortly thereafter.

Ladies, you've been warned.

 

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50 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Well, that's what the love of a good woman (who'll usually end up dying at about the 54:00 minute mark of every episode they're in) will do to a guy, ya know!  ;)

I don't remember the story line that well, but there is a scene in Tin Men where they discuss Bonanza.  As one guy points out the father and three sons are all fairly close in age.  Also, he had three wives who all died in childbirth.

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55 minutes ago, TheCid said:

I don't remember the story line that well, but there is a scene in Tin Men where they discuss Bonanza.  As one guy points out the father and three sons are all fairly close in age.  Also, he had three wives who all died in childbirth.

Ah, Tin Men. LOVE that movie! Thanks for remembering this, Cid.

Saaaay, ya know. Couldn't this one be considered a "comedy noir" of sorts?

Tin_men_poster.jpg

(...I think yes...YES?)

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29 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Couldn't this one be considered a "comedy noir" of sorts?

I haven't seen it for a while and its on a mental list of films I should go back and check out. So it may be.

Another film that I've never seen that could very well be another Neo Noir is Al Pacino's Cruising (1980), anybody here seen it or know if it's ever been on TCM.

I don't have that Moviecollector Ohio [sic] search link. :D

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

I haven't seen it for a while and its on a mental list of films I should go back and check out. So it may be.

Another film that I've never seen that could very well be another Neo Noir is Al Pacino's Cruising (1980), anybody here seen it or know if it's ever been on TCM.

I don't have that Moviecollector Ohio [sic] search link. :D

http://www.moviecollectoroh.com/reports/TCM_SCHEDULES_SUMMARY_alpha.htm

Cruising has not been shown, which isn't a surprise given the controversial nature of it. I'd say it has noir touches, definitely. I have the DVD as part of my Pacino collection, but I haven't seen it in years. There's a remastered Blu ray due later this year.

81I+C8EzReL._SX385_.jpg

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12 hours ago, Dargo said:

And speaking of the "musical accompaniment" aspect here...

I've thought for some time now that one of the reasons Dark Passage seems to better satisfy the viewer than does the other first-person perspective camera gimmick-ed film Lady in the Lake IS because of Robert Montgomery's choice in the latter to use the wordless choral music instead of the usual orchestral instrumental one.

And, which is something I've come to find a little off-putting about LITL, as that chorus just begins to grate by the film's end.

(...at least to my ears, anyway)

Dargo, I think the main reason Dark Passage is better than The Lady in the Lake is that Delmer Daves is a much better director than Robert Montgomery. I have never seen Ride the Pink Horse, but will have to seek it out.

For Miss W and others not familiar with Wanda Hendrix: she gives a first-rate performance in Confidential Agent. That one turns up on TCM from time to time.

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

http://www.moviecollectoroh.com/reports/TCM_SCHEDULES_SUMMARY_alpha.htm

Cruising has not been shown, which isn't a surprise given the controversial nature of it. I'd say it has noir touches, definitely. I have the DVD as part of my Pacino collection, but I haven't seen it in years. There's a remastered Blu ray due later this year.

81I+C8EzReL._SX385_.jpg

Thanks for the link.

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6 hours ago, kingrat said:

Dargo, I think the main reason Dark Passage is better than The Lady in the Lake is that Delmer Daves is a much better director than Robert Montgomery. I have never seen Ride the Pink Horse, but will have to seek it out.

For Miss W and others not familiar with Wanda Hendrix: she gives a first-rate performance in Confidential Agent. That one turns up on TCM from time to time.

Delmer Daves' probably the reason, agree. There is a Transitional Noir that uses that same POV.

We see an unfocused shot of the sky sliced & diced and fragmented by bare branches. As the frame focuses and our view pans we see the branches are trees, we see buildings, and Central Park at the corner of 59th and 5th. Hands “rub” the eye of the camera, that "rub" also begins a faint jazz heartbeat increasing in tempo and volume as “we” the character sitting on a park bench search frantically through our suit pockets (for identification) combing out a train timetable, a scrap of paper with a phone number and some pills. A ring on his finger has an inscription “from G.V.”. The POV sequence continues until we stumble into a mirror at the Plaza Hotel when James Garner is revealed. He has neither money or ID but he does remember the name of a woman, a woman named Grace. 

Bud01.jpg

Bud02.jpg

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Screenshot%2B%25281243%2529.png

Screenshot%2B%25281245%2529.png

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Bud30.jpg

Bud31.jpg

By their style you will know them. :D

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15 hours ago, Dargo said:

Ah, Tin Men. LOVE that movie! Thanks for remembering this, Cid.

Saaaay, ya know. Couldn't this one be considered a "comedy noir" of sorts?

Tin_men_poster.jpg

(...I think yes...YES?)

Not so sure Tin Men would be considered Noir.  To me it is too much a romantic comedy of errors.  While the profession (aluminum siding salesmen) of the "Tin Men" may be considered criminal, I don't think it rises to the Noir level.

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Delmer Daves' probably the reason, agree. There is a Transitional Noir that uses that same POV.

We see an unfocused shot of the sky sliced & diced and fragmented by bare branches. As the frame focuses and our view pans we see the branches are trees, we see buildings, and Central Park at the corner of 59th and 5th. Hands “rub” the eye of the camera, that "rub" also begins a faint jazz heartbeat increasing in tempo and volume as “we” the character sitting on a park bench search frantically through our suit pockets (for identification) combing out a train timetable, a scrap of paper with a phone number and some pills. A ring on his finger has an inscription “from G.V.”. The POV sequence continues until we stumble into a mirror at the Plaza Hotel when James Garner is revealed. He has neither money or ID but he does remember the name of a woman, a woman named Grace. 

Bud01.jpg

By their style you will know them. :D

This looks like an interesting film.  I didn't know that James Garner appeared in noir.

What is the name of this film?

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24 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

This looks like an interesting film.  I didn't know that James Garner appeared in noir.

What is the name of this film?

Mister Buddwing (1966)

Lol, he didn't know it either.  

Sort of a psychological noir rather than a “crime” noir. A melancholy film that plays with time, space and your mind as the various vignettes overlap it's eerie and noir-ishly suspenseful, but at times darkly comic. It requires multiple viewings to fully comprehend.

In a quest for a woman named Grace, Garner meets four women, Angela Lansbury, Katherine Ross, Susanne Pleshette, and Jean Simmons, each of the women he at first mistakes for Grace. So at first we see Garner interact with each woman in their true identities and at some point they become a vivid flashback to his relationship with Grace at different stages of his past life with Grace, the starry eyed young love stage, the struggle with real life, and the consequences of wrong decisions made. All this makes the viewer a little disoriented, a little lost, exactly how James Garner's character feels throughout the movie.

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50 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

This looks like an interesting film.  I didn't know that James Garner appeared in noir.

What is the name of this film?

Garner also took on the role of private investigator Phillip Marlowe in the 1969 neo-noir Marlowe.

(...and in this case the "neo" being especially appropriate, as the film was set during the current time of the late-1960s, and was filmed in color)

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49 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Mister Buddwing (1966)

Lol, he didn't know it either.  

Sort of a psychological noir rather than a “crime” noir. A melancholy film that plays with time, space and your mind as the various vignettes overlap it's eerie and noir-ishly suspenseful, but at times darkly comic. It requires multiple viewings to fully comprehend.

In a quest for a woman named Grace, Garner meets four women, Angela Lansbury, Katherine Ross, Susanne Pleshette, and Jean Simmons, each of the women he at first mistakes for Grace. So at first we see Garner interact with each woman in their true identities and at some point they become a vivid flashback to his relationship with Grace at different stages of his past life with Grace, the starry eyed young love stage, the struggle with real life, and the consequences of wrong decisions made. All this makes the viewer a little disoriented, a little lost, exactly how James Garner's character feels throughout the movie.

I've watched Mr. Buddwing a couple of times and still can't get into it, even though Garner is one of my favorite actors.  The women in it are first class.

Don't know if I would call it Noir, but rather just a drama.  A dark and dreary drama.

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So apparently I recorded Mister Buddwing back in January.  I just found it on my DVR.  Just goes to show how much I pay attention. Lol. 

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25 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

So apparently I recorded Mister Buddwing back in January.  I just found it on my DVR.  Just goes to show how much I pay attention. Lol. 

OR, just might be suffering a bit of the same affliction as Mr. Buddwing had yourself here, speedy.

(...that of course being the "C.R.S. Syndrome"...I get this occasionally myself, in fact...and a little more it seems the older I get, in fact...see what you have to look forward to here, kid?!)  ;)

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26 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Don't know if I would call it Noir, but rather just a drama.  A dark and dreary drama.

Sounds like a Drama Noir to me, with same M.O. as In A Lonely Place

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Too bad The People Against O'Hara wasn't shot in NYC as originally planned. What passes for The Westside Highway or The FDR Drive is obviously one of the L.A. River bridges.

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On 7/11/2019 at 12:05 PM, speedracer5 said:

So apparently I recorded Mister Buddwing back in January.  I just found it on my DVR.  Just goes to show how much I pay attention. Lol. 

DELETE IT.

Author's note: I am completely aware a firm non-recommendation from me means a title gets bumped to the top of everyone's "MUST SEE" list. Still, I warn you like CRAZY RALPH to stay away.

 

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Too bad The People Against O'Hara wasn't shot in NYC as originally planned. What passes for The Westside Highway or The FDR Drive is obviously one of the L.A. River bridges.

Too far from Spencer Tracy's favorite drinking spots?  Per Muller, they shot exteriors in NYC for two weeks.

Seen it before, but long enough that I forgot most of it.  Pretty good movie and well worth watching.  The first movie I remember seeing Diana Lynn in was Plunder Under the Sun, (1953) with Glenn Ford.  She plays an alcoholic or drunk, but Glenn helps her to stop.  Wonder if she learned how to play it from Spencer in The People Against O'Hara?

Plunder is a pretty good movie and I frequently re-watch it.  Based on a book by David Dodge, which I actually read before became aware of the movie.  It was one of those books re-published by Hardcase Crimes.

Next weeks feature is another good one with a good cast - Dana Andrews, Ida Lupino, George Sanders, Vincent Price, Thomas Mitchell, Rhonda Fleming and more.  While The City Sleeps (1956).

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8 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Per Muller, they shot exteriors in NYC for two weeks.

Yea the scenes down at the old Fulton Fish Market and in DUMBO. You can always tell the Manhattan street scenes are sets for the lack of parked vehicles. It seems as if in Noir Hollywood Manhattan there is always a place to park. 😎 

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